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Chili advice needed


vejlin
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with really hot chillis like this I wouldn't cut them up, just add them whole to a dish during cooking and remove them whole later

 

(if you're going to stir things up take them out while you do so and put them back again, you really don't want to pop them)

 

and don't fry frying them when they're cut up the vaporised capsasisn/oil mix that can result is a great way to make the kitchen uninhabitable as a friend found out

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For bhut jolokia or the Scorpions, I advise washing, drying, and grinding into powder to use very sparingly when you want an extra kick.

If you aren't used to spicy dishes, don't eat them.

 

Ive once eaten the bhut jolokia substrain, the dorset naga, raw. It is the only time I have had issues with a chilli.

I was relatively fine at the time... later however ... http://www.livestrong.com/article/518310-can-jalapeno-peppers-cause-painful-urination/

 

Don't do it. Just don't.

 

 

Dysuria... really? That I didn't know.

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I've eaten a bunch of really hot stuff, and burning urine was never the source of uncomfortable elimination.  I think that would have made me quit eating spicy foods immediately.   :huh:

 

 

Also, when simmering very hot peppers, if you are using a lid, make sure not to breathe in the vapor as you remove the lid.  You will sear the hell out of your lungs and sinuses.  Remove the lid, give a second, then look in.  Same goes true if you are using a blender or food processor to puree peppers into a paste.

Edited by Qwyksilver
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Also for making chili oil, would I need to cut or process it first pr do I just dunk the whole chili in there?

Either works fine, but I normally just add them whole.

 

 

How do you go about drying chilis?

dehydrator is good too.  Or slow and low in the oven

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I have never cooked with anything stronger than a habanero, but I strongly support the advice that you wear gloves and use caution. Strong strong chili residue can get everywhere, and it lasts for quite a while.

 

So a co-worker gave me a baggie of home grown chilies, including some Moruga Trinidad Scorpions. And I have no idea what to do with the chilis that get into the 'ridiculously hot' range. Are they actually used for anything other than eating raw in youtube videos?

Being grown in Denmark they are undoubtedly not as potent as the same plant in a place with more sun, but still I have no idea what to cook with them.

 

In view of your question, I hope the irony of your forum title and avatar is not lost on you. :poke:

 

Sounds to me like they should be treated as toxic waste! Call your local hazmat team to dispose of them....

 

Actually, sufficiently pure capsaicin (the chemical that makes peppers burn) is usually counted as a chemical weapon.

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I've eaten a bunch of really hot stuff, and burning urine was never the source of uncomfortable elimination.  I think that would have made me quit eating spicy foods immediately.   :huh:

 

 

Also, when simmering very hot peppers, if you are using a lid, make sure not to breathe in the vapor as you remove the lid.  You will sear the hell out of your lungs and sinuses.  Remove the lid, give a second, then look in.  Same goes true if you are using a blender or food processor to puree peppers into a paste.

And turn the vent on your fume stove hood.

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Back in action, so I also advise the use of gloves when preparing them.

 

I speak of experience and the insidiousness of the capsaicin from chopping bhut jolokia peppers.

 

Even if you think you've chopped them carefully and didn't have any body part touch another one, and kept every thing clean and washed often, natural capsaicin oil penetrates *slowly* into the skin. So even after you've properly washed your hands, you soon start feeling a tingling, and then a burning sensation. A no matter how much ice water, milk products or other vegetable oils you use to get rid of it, the damage is already done. Your skin is now reacting to a chemical burn and has become hyper-sensitive to heat for many, many hours. The body heat produced by my closed hand was too much the bear.

 

The pain lasted until late in the evening. And the chili I made with them didn't turn out to be that good either.

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You could go the other route:

 

Poke holes in the pepper

Toss some ground up sea salt over said pepper

Grill pepper until warm and a little charred

Eat pepper

Have paramedics close by for doing this with anything hotter than a habenero

 

I was once told that this is one of the hottest ways to eat a pepper sonce being warm opens pores in tongue and the salt keeps them open for pepper juices to flow into.

 

Even with a habenero, paramedics could be a good idea if you don't eat hot peppers often.

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I've eaten a bunch of really hot stuff, and burning urine was never the source of uncomfortable elimination.  I think that would have made me quit eating spicy foods immediately.   :huh:

 

 

Also, when simmering very hot peppers, if you are using a lid, make sure not to breathe in the vapor as you remove the lid.  You will sear the hell out of your lungs and sinuses.  Remove the lid, give a second, then look in.  Same goes true if you are using a blender or food processor to puree peppers into a paste.

And turn the vent on your fume stove hood.

 

 

But only if it is actually a vent!

If it's just one of those "blows the air through a filter then dumps it back into the kitchen" monstrosities, don't bother - the best you're doing is delaying the inevitable (that capsaicin has to go somewhere eventually...  :blink: )

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Ok, let me say that I do like spicy food very much. What you are talking about is a pepper that, along with just a few others up at the top of the scoville scale, has actually been weaponized. These are peppers bred by madmen for the purpose of answering "What if...?" These are peppers that exist only to test one's physical and psychological endurance.

 

Don't eat these peppers.

Throw them away.

Edited by Baugi
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gloves.  definitely.   I made the mistake when making curry with thai chilis once and went to take out my contacts later... ugh.  Never again. 

Also, particularly if you're male, using the toilet can become... uncomfortable.

 

quote for truth. Super hot hotwings. 'nuff said

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