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Alakai

OMG What is in my MOUTH

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It might be older ones then. All of the newer bottles clearly state they contain no heavy metals. Even the reds.

Newer ones (within the last year or so) also contain Cadmium.  Most bottles don't, and are labeled as such.  Sea Green is the color I own that has that warning.

 

 

This. Now all reds have Cadmium, but several greens and reds and skincolors do. They are all clearly labeled, however. 

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It might be older ones then. All of the newer bottles clearly state they contain no heavy metals. Even the reds.

Newer ones (within the last year or so) also contain Cadmium.  Most bottles don't, and are labeled as such.  Sea Green is the color I own that has that warning.

 

 

This. Now all reds have Cadmium, but several greens and reds and skincolors do. They are all clearly labeled, however. 

 

 

Good to know. I avoid any paints with heavy metals in them regardless. Just in case I put my brush in my mouth out of force of habit.

I use P3's and they only contain a mild irritant, which is also used in vaccines as a homogenizer.

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It might be older ones then. All of the newer bottles clearly state they contain no heavy metals. Even the reds.

Newer ones (within the last year or so) also contain Cadmium.  Most bottles don't, and are labeled as such.  Sea Green is the color I own that has that warning.

 

 

This. Now all reds have Cadmium, but several greens and reds and skincolors do. They are all clearly labeled, however. 

 

 

Good to know. I avoid any paints with heavy metals in them regardless. Just in case I put my brush in my mouth out of force of habit.

I use P3's and they only contain a mild irritant, which is also used in vaccines as a homogenizer.

 

 

I just realize I wrote "Now all reds..." when I meant "no all reds..." Sorry.

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When my bristles are acting up I'll resort to saliva to keep them in line. Pun 8ntended.

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For me depends on the brush.  The fine tipped ones I need to get the tip pointy and find only the tip in mouth action works.  Used to do it for all brushes, but broke that habit as for a while I was painting for a guy in my gaming group who collected miniatures for years and didn't paint them.  Lots of older ral patha stuff made of lead based metals. 

 

Nowadays I worry more about the fine metal fillings from using a file.   I use a facemask and apron as I realized I was getting what I would refer to as miniature nose whenever I filed and cleaned cast lines on minis.  The fine dusting on my clothes and in my face was not so good.  That said here and there I still forget to put it on and miniature nose returns.  People at work can tell when I have forgotten to cover up as I sit wrinkling my nose like a Tabitha in Bewitched.

 

There is also the thing where I need to put my brush cleaning water on my left side and coffee on my right.  Otherwise hilarity  ensues when I absentmindedly attempt to take a sip out of my water and clean my brush in my coffee.

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I've gotten in the habit of using my off-hand for shaping brush points.  By folding in my little finger, I create ... um, "palm cleavage" that works nicely for aligning the bristles without getting them anywhere near my mouth. 

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I have been slowly training myself away from pointing my brush with my lips (that is what I am assuming everyone means by "brush licking"). I still do it occasionally out of habit (only with a recently rinsed and dried brush). my current best practice is to use the webbing of my hand between thumb and forefinger to point.

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I have been slowly training myself away from pointing my brush with my lips (that is what I am assuming everyone means by "brush licking"). I still do it occasionally out of habit (only with a recently rinsed and dried brush). my current best practice is to use the webbing of my hand between thumb and forefinger to point.

 

When I refer to brush licking, I don't mean to get it to a point. I use water and wet paper towel for that.

 

When I talk about brush licking, I mean using a second brush that's wet, and then soaked further with saliva. This is what I use for two brush blending.

The saliva allows you to push and pull the paint around on the miniature while wet to achieve smooth blends. It does this by not breaking the surface tension of your paint, which water has a tendency to do, and why you'll often get 'bathtub rings' from the paint drying quicker in patches.

 

So, when I talk about 'brush licking', I mean putting a clean brush in your mouth and soaking it with saliva, and then using it to blend wet paint.

As long as proper safety measures are used (a separate cup of clean water just for that brush, and rinsing it before sticking it in your mouth again), one has nothing to worry about by licking their brush.

It also helps to have MSDS sheets for any paints and additives you use. Informing yourself about what's in anything you use is the best practice.

 

Now, licking your brush with paint or additives on it is another story.

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AFAIK Vallejo has always put cadmium in its paints, and they never used to label them. And "non-toxic" is a joke. I've literally seen cadmium red pigment labeled non-toxic, emailed the seller to protest, and been told to go shove it. I wouldn't trust any paint line not to contain heavy metals, unless you've seen a statement from someone who actually worked on the paint recipes that it does not.

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AFAIK Vallejo has always put cadmium in its paints, and they never used to label them. And "non-toxic" is a joke. I've literally seen cadmium red pigment labeled non-toxic, emailed the seller to protest, and been told to go shove it. I wouldn't trust any paint line not to contain heavy metals, unless you've seen a statement from someone who actually worked on the paint recipes that it does not.

 

What the 'non-toxic' cadmium means is that the particulate is very large, and supposedly won't be absorbed in the digestive tract. At least this is what I have been told.

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I wonder if anyone every stuck their AIRBRUSH in their mouth?????

I was reading through the old posts, feeling pretty smug that I don't lick my brushes, when I read this post.

 

Ugh, yeah. Admission time. I have put my lips to the airbrush nozzle before, to backblow paint out of the needle and back into the cup. I got really frustrated with how often the needle was clogging, and impatient at the idea of tearing it down and cleaning it out repeatedly. Thinking about it, it was pretty dumb, and kind of dangerous in a more immediate sort of way, and totally unnecessary, since you can cover the tip and let the compressed air do the backblow for you.

 

I once saw a guy on a dare, put the hose from a compressed air tank (used for blowing out dust) into his mouth, and give a quick blast. The results looked hilarious, and more than a little painful. He said afterward that he felt air escape out of his tear ducts.

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I wonder if anyone every stuck their AIRBRUSH in their mouth?????

I was reading through the old posts, feeling pretty smug that I don't lick my brushes, when I read this post.

Ugh, yeah. Admission time. I have put my lips to the airbrush nozzle before, to backblow paint out of the needle and back into the cup. I got really frustrated with how often the needle was clogging, and impatient at the idea of tearing it down and cleaning it out repeatedly. Thinking about it, it was pretty dumb, and kind of dangerous in a more immediate sort of way, and totally unnecessary, since you can cover the tip and let the compressed air do the backblow for you.

I once saw a guy on a dare, put the hose from a compressed air tank (used for blowing out dust) into his mouth, and give a quick blast. The results looked hilarious, and more than a little painful. He said afterward that he felt air escape out of his tear ducts.

There is a sort of little rubber bulb thing sold in drugstores for helping clear out the noses of babies too young to understand how to blow their own noses.

 

I have no idea what it is really called. In my family the word for it is "snaffulator".

 

It is an excellent tool for a quick puff of air into a small space where it is inadvisable for human lips to go.

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There is a sort of little rubber bulb thing sold in drugstores for helping clear out the noses of babies too young to understand how to blow their own noses.

I have no idea what it is really called. In my family the word for it is "snaffulator".

It is an excellent tool for a quick puff of air into a small space where it is inadvisable for human lips to go.

A snot bulb? We kept ours, but it's used to irrigate earwax now. I doubt it would be appreciated if I appropriated it for other purposes.

 

Instead, I now close my (usually gloved) left hand in a fist, cover the nozzle with the fleshy part between thumb and index fingers, and slowly let air through the brush and back through the nozzle until the cup bubbles.

 

Yeah, the only lips that touch the airbrush now are those of Johnny, Señor Wences's old stage partner.

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