Jump to content

Basius & Basius 2 Stamp Pads Bases and Terrain


ub3r_n3rd
 Share

Recommended Posts

This was posted in the kickstarter thread which is now closed so I am going to answer it here.

So I'm having trouble to get this stuff working with 25mm bases for infinity. The problem im having is once Ive pressed the mould into the green stuff attached to the base... I always have excess around the edges and trying to trim it away puts the mould out of shape, no matter how carefully i Try to remove it. What's the solution here wait till it sets then cut it away?

I have seen that happen as well.

One thing you can do is let the putty cure enough that it stiffens up some but is not completely set before trimming the excess.

If you do that it will not be pulled out of shape as much when you trim it.

 

You could also let it set completely and trim it then.

100% Green Stuff should be soft enough to trim with a sharp knife at this point.

Things that set hard like Apoxie Sculpt could be trimmed with a saw of some kind at this point.

You might need to sand the edge a litte to clean up the saw marks depending on what you use to make the cut.

I have been thinking of using my scroll saw to trim hardened bases myself but I have not tried it yet to see how well it works.

Edited by arclance
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 74
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

This was posted in the kickstarter thread which is now closed so I am going to answer it here.

So I'm having trouble to get this stuff working with 25mm bases for infinity. The problem im having is once Ive pressed the mould into the green stuff attached to the base... I always have excess around the edges and trying to trim it away puts the mould out of shape, no matter how carefully i Try to remove it. What's the solution here wait till it sets then cut it away?

I have seen that happen as well.

One thing you can do is let the putty cure enough that it stiffens up some but is not completely set before trimming the excess.

If you do that it will not be pulled out of shape as much when you trim it.

 

You could also let it set completely and trim it then.

100% Green Stuff should be soft enough to trim with a sharp knife at this point.

Things that set hard like Apoxie Sculpt could be trimmed with a saw of some kind at this point.

You might need to sand the edge a litte to clean up the saw marks depending on what you use to make the cut.

I have been thinking of using my scroll saw to trim hardened bases myself but I have not tired it yet to see how well it works.

 

 

Makes sense, my first time using green stuff, so wasnt really sure about the hardening times and such.   I'll let it set a little then trim and see how that goes, might try the putting it in the freezer trick too.

 

I'm curious about how some of the other mentioned sculpting clay in this thread might work too.... going to have to pick some up at some point and give it a try!

Edited by anab0lic
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been thinking of using my scroll saw to trim hardened bases myself but I have not tried it yet to see how well it works.

I tried this and it works fairly well.

The cuts are not the straightest but I think I need to go to Woodcraft and get some new blades (I only have one left) that are better for straight cuts.

 

Apoxie Sculpt

img_0286_corrections_cropped_resized_653

 

1:1 Green Stuff/Apoxie Sculpt

img_0290_corrections_cropped_resized_649

 

I also got my order of Super Sculpey and Super Sculpey Firm and used them to make bases.

 

Super Sculpey Original

img_0294_corrections_cropped_resized_634

 

1:1 Super Sculpey Original/Super Sculpey Firm

img_0297_corrections_cropped_resized_628

 

Super Sculpey Firm

img_0299_corrections_cropped_resized_655

 

The 1:1 Super Sculpey Original/Super Sculpey Firm worked best.

I used water as a release agent and froze them for 10 minutes before removing them from the mold which worked very well.

All left almost no residue on the Basius pad.

All the Sculpeys do have the advantage of making bases much faster than the epoxie putties because they set by being baked for 15 minutes instead of sitting for ~8 hours.

They are also cheaper than any of the other things I tried at ~$10 a pound.

Also you can trim and reuse any excess that comes of the side of the base at any time not immediately like with the self hardening epoxy putties.

Edited by arclance
  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys be careful doing the freezer trick, I tried it with green stuff, .... it must have only been in the freezer about 15 mins and when I went to pull it off the mould, some of the resin came off with it ... was only a tiny speckle but yeah.... just a heads up.

 

I'm gonna put an order in for some super sculpey, My green stuff attempts havent really come out as sharp/crisp as id like and those pictures above look much better!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, if anyone feels gutsy, I put a chip off the corner of a pad into the oven with my sculpey. It came out unchanged (275f/130c for 15min). I think one could put a basius into the oven with sculpey on it without harming it, but I haven't yet decided if I have the guts to try it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, if anyone feels gutsy, I put a chip off the corner of a pad into the oven with my sculpey. It came out unchanged (275f/130c for 15min). I think one could put a basius into the oven with sculpey on it without harming it, but I haven't yet decided if I have the guts to try it.

with the cost of these things i dont fancy being the lab rat for this experiment xD

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I have been thinking of using my scroll saw to trim hardened bases myself but I have not tried it yet to see how well it works.

I tried this and it works fairly well.

The cuts are not the straightest but I think I need to go to Woodcraft and get some new blades (I only have one left) that are better for straight cuts.

 

Apoxie Sculpt

img_0286_corrections_cropped_resized_653

 

1:1 Green Stuff/Apoxie Sculpt

img_0290_corrections_cropped_resized_649

 

I also got my order of Super Sculpey and Super Sculpey Firm and used them to make bases.

 

Super Sculpey Original

img_0294_corrections_cropped_resized_634

 

1:1 Super Sculpey Original/Super Sculpey Firm

img_0297_corrections_cropped_resized_628

 

Super Sculpey Firm

img_0299_corrections_cropped_resized_655

 

The 1:1 Super Sculpey Original/Super Sculpey Firm worked best.

I used water as a release agent and froze them for 10 minutes before removing them from the mold which worked very well.

All left almost no residue on the Basius pad.

All the Sculpeys do have the advantage of making bases much faster than the epoxie putties because they set by being baked for 15 minutes instead of sitting for ~8 hours.

They are also cheaper than any of the other things I tried at ~$10 a pound.

Also you can trim and reuse any excess that comes of the side of the base at any time not immediately like with the self hardening epoxy putties.

 

Apologies for the thread necromancy, but I really like the detail you got with Sculpey, but had a few questions:

 

1. Did you put the Sculpey on the base initially to press it into the mould, cut it to size and then remove the Sculpey to bake? (I'm guessing that putting the base in the oven with the Sculpey is a really bad idea)

2. How did you reattach the Sculpey to the base after baking? Just use super glue?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apologies for the thread necromancy, but I really like the detail you got with Sculpey, but had a few questions: 

1. Did you put the Sculpey on the base initially to press it into the mould, cut it to size and then remove the Sculpey to bake? (I'm guessing that putting the base in the oven with the Sculpey is a really bad idea)

2. How did you reattach the Sculpey to the base after baking? Just use super glue?

The plastic bases soften a lot but don't melt in the oven so I do not bake them on them.

They just slump into a sad flat disc if you do bake them with sulpey on them.

 

I cut wooden bases out of 1/16" fiberboard to match the plastic bases and use those to make Sculpey bases.

I put the Sculpey on the base and press it into the mold.

If the sculpey is still attached to the base I trim it using the base edge as a guide.

If the sulpey is loose I trim as close to the base edge as I can with a pair of scissors using the base as a guide.

I then put them on the wooden bases and bake them in the oven.

I re-attach them to the bases with superglue if needed.

Then I trim them with a scalpel and sand them with a dremel tool to remove any remaining overhang even with the wooden base.

I then fill any gaps between the base and the Sulpey with whatever lefover gap filling medium I have out that day and sand that smooth once it sets.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Apologies for the thread necromancy, but I really like the detail you got with Sculpey, but had a few questions: 

1. Did you put the Sculpey on the base initially to press it into the mould, cut it to size and then remove the Sculpey to bake? (I'm guessing that putting the base in the oven with the Sculpey is a really bad idea)

2. How did you reattach the Sculpey to the base after baking? Just use super glue?

The plastic bases soften a lot but don't melt in the oven so I do not bake them on them.

They just slump into a sad flat disc if you do bake them with sulpey on them.

 

I cut wooden bases out of 1/16" fiberboard to match the plastic bases and use those to make Sculpey bases.

I put the Sculpey on the base and press it into the mold.

If the sculpey is still attached to the base I trim it using the base edge as a guide.

If the sulpey is loose I trim as close to the base edge as I can with a pair of scissors using the base as a guide.

I then put them on the wooden bases and bake them in the oven.

I re-attach them to the bases with superglue if needed.

Then I trim them with a scalpel and sand them with a dremel tool to remove any remaining overhang even with the wooden base.

I then fill any gaps between the base and the Sulpey with whatever lefover gap filling medium I have out that day and sand that smooth once it sets.

 

Cheers for the info arclance

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some interesting information here.

 

With the new Basius kickstarter hitting backers, looked around and found this one.

 

Locally Games Plus sells the wooden bases, probably from Gale Force 9, so the wooden base itself isn't a problem. Interesting to see the results of the Sculpey. Might have to do that mix myself.

 

Is anyone still using them? Any different advice?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...