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Dr.Bedlam

Computer Boardgames

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So I was at a Barnes and Noble today, and they have some boardgames there, some good ones. And I finally saw this X-Com boardgame I'd heard about.

I liked X-Com, back in the days when Windows 95 ruled the world, and you always had to monkey with the AUTOEXEC.BAT file to get anything to work. So I picked up the game and looked at it. Any interesting miniatures?

Not really. Lots of tokens and bits, though... looked kind of Arkham-Horror-esque, really...  and I was disturbed to see that you needed to download this special app to play the thing, although it hastened to assure you that the app was free.

So... we have a boardgame... based on a computer game... but now it's a boardgame... and you still need a computer with a special program to play the thing!

Doesn't that kind of defeat the purpose of a boardgame in the first place?

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My flgs friend said the computer component helped with ... Setup? Or keeping track of the'upkeep'.

 

He also said the game was the r&d aspect of the game, not so much the mission attack aspect.

 

I'm kinda trying to come up with a way to play the whole x-com game on tabletop with friends.

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To answer the question, (I would have lady pay, but my lovely wife brought me pie)

Yes, it does defeat the purpose of turning xcom into a board game.

 

Have you tried the newest release of xcom?

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Can't say that I have. Tried X-Com, X-Com: Terror From The Deep, and X-Com: Enforcer, which was a vurra different beast from the first two. And I've played computer versions of board and card games that I thought were pretty good... but I've never played a board version of a computer game that I thought was AS good (although I've often bought them to get the miniatures.)

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I am very fond of certain computer versions of boardgames, such as Ticket to Ride and Carcacone , but board game versions of computer games...just doesn't seem like a really good thing to me.

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I have played the board game and it is fun. What the app provides is basically a sound track for the game, controlling the alien side of things.

 

The human players cooperate, with each player being in charge of a specific area like air combat, ground combat or research. They have to cooperate under time pressure and the game is quite intense.

 

Apart from the theme though, the game has nothing in common with Xcom computer games. The board game is a distributed resource management game and not a tactical combat game.

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I am very fond of certain computer versions of boardgames, such as Ticket to Ride and Carcacone , but board game versions of computer games...just doesn't seem like a really good thing to me.

You mean you didn't rush out and buy a copy of Words With Friends, the boardgames?

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I am very fond of certain computer versions of boardgames, such as Ticket to Ride and Carcacone , but board game versions of computer games...just doesn't seem like a really good thing to me.

You mean you didn't rush out and buy a copy of Words With Friends, the boardgames?

 

since mom owns the very fancy version of Scrabble, with the board on a turntable and the fancy wood and such. No, no I did not.

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Let's kind of look at the ultimate progression of this; Civilization. The original boardgame was created by Francis Tresham (who I have had the pleasure to have met) and published by Hartland Trefoil and published in the US by Avalon Hill. This is the original game that Sid Meier's computer game was based on. The computer game has sense spawned off not one but two boardgames along with the various its own various editions and sequels. While not quite in the same vein as Doc's example of X-Com I always like to throw out the fact that one of the most successful computer games of all time had its origins from a lowly boardgame. And I do own a very well played copy of Civilization, the original Hartland Trefoil edition.

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I am very fond of certain computer versions of boardgames, such as Ticket to Ride and Carcacone , but board game versions of computer games...just doesn't seem like a really good thing to me.

You mean you didn't rush out and buy a copy of Words With Friends, the boardgames?

since mom owns the very fancy version of Scrabble, with the board on a turntable and the fancy wood and such. No, no I did not.

Is that the Onyx edition, with the black wooden tiles? Loved that set!

Edited by Qwyksilver

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X-COM is a fun board game.  The app makes sense since it plays the bad guys and allows for options that you can't really do in cooperative games when you play against the board, and it is an alternative to having a human overlord like some other board games.  Having an app do all the heavy lifting for you allows you to play WITH all of your friends as opposed to against one.  

 

I own Super Motherload (sic) which is a pretty cool board game based on a video game and that works well too.  Twilight Imperium, another game I own, is practically Master of Orion in board game form.  There is room for a lot of crossover between the two medias and some good games can come from it.  

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Let's kind of look at the ultimate progression of this; Civilization. The original boardgame was created by Francis Tresham (who I have had the pleasure to have met) and published by Hartland Trefoil and published in the US by Avalon Hill. This is the original game that Sid Meier's computer game was based on. The computer game has sense spawned off not one but two boardgames along with the various its own various editions and sequels. While not quite in the same vein as Doc's example of X-Com I always like to throw out the fact that one of the most successful computer games of all time had its origins from a lowly boardgame. And I do own a very well played copy of Civilization, the original Hartland Trefoil edition.

Lowly boardgame, my hairy red bahonkus. The AH version is a bear. Especially with the right players.

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