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Help! There is something wrong with my wet palette!


knarthex
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I use a normal kitchen sponge in a Pyrex container (I prefer glass, I think it's easier to clean and less likely to have buildup).  On top of the sponge I use a folded paper towel, and then parchment paper on top of that.  I actually have a problem with the parchment paper drying out (usually after a day or so); I suspect that the parchment paper I have is too thick and slowly dries out faster than it absorbs more water.  Still, I found adding the paper towel helped with pulling enough water through the sponge, but not getting too much water soaking through.

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It looks like the paint has sat a while and separated out. I will usually take an old drybrush and wick off the excess liquid, leaving a little to be worked back into the pigment.  I don't add thinner/water on the palette. I pick up some water on my brush and mix a drop or so at a time as I need it.  This allows me to keep 20-30 colors at a time because the paint doesn't run all over the place. 

 

I like paper towels to wick up unwanted water.  I get a lot of control by just putting a corner of a paper towel on the edge of the paint/water mix and it instantly sucks up excess water -- along with some paint.

 

The trick is to just pinch off a bit of paper towel.  The smaller the piece, the less is wicked up.  More paper, more wicking.  With a big, huge piece of paper you'll wick up all of the water.

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I don't have pictures at the moment, but... I use the Sta-wet palette with the sponge that came with it and parchment paper.  I found the paper that came with it let the paint soak into the paper/sponge too much.  I keep the water level right below the parchment paper.  I'll put one or two drops of paint and maybe a brush-full of water into a color.  If I let it sit for a day or two, I will see it separate, but a little mixing will usually fix that.  I get 15-30 colors on there, depending on a variety of factors.

 

 

 

I also use a Sta-wet palette. I picked mine up online at Dick Blick as I could not find one locally. I've never had an issue with paint soaking into the sponge. Did you guys pre-soak the paper like you are supposed to?

 

Yup. It soaks up my paint even after I have been using the same paper for days.

 

Well, I set it all up, soaked the paper for a long time, and didn't use it til Monday. Last night I popped it open and the paint had about dried out / soaked into th paper. The sponge was not discolored....

(Yellow sponge, white paint)

When I touched a finger tip to it, it felt like tubed acryllic....

 

So last night I cut a piece of parchment paper to size and put it in, to try tonight...

 

Trick / tip to try- While trying to smooth out the baking parchment I tried using a blister card to try to get all the air out from under the paper and smooth it out. Didn't work to well....

As I looked for something that might work, I spied my trusty #1 X-Acto knife. I took the blade chuck of completely, as I didn't want to cut the paper, or myself, and it worked like a charm!

 

post-14271-0-34733600-1441845161_thumb.jpg post-14271-0-75692300-1441845166_thumb.jpg

 

Will be putting paint on it tonight. Will report later....

 

8)

George

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does your wet pallet come with a cover?    I use an old plastic box from some GW grass used for basing and it has a lid.  When closed the paint lasts for days and you only need to stir it up as it seperates if left to long.   If i leave the lid off the paint will dry out as it cannot wick enough water to counteract the evaporation process.

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does your wet pallet come with a cover?    I use an old plastic box from some GW grass used for basing and it has a lid.  When closed the paint lasts for days and you only need to stir it up as it seperates if left to long.   If i leave the lid off the paint will dry out as it cannot wick enough water to counteract the evaporation process.

Yes, the one showed in the original pic does have a cover. Tupperware container...

The paint in that didn't dry out.

The Mastersons that I bought, I think the paper may be over absorbent.... The directions for the Mastersons paper say to soak it in hot water for 15  minutes plus, and over soaking will not hurt it. I was playing Pathfinder when I soaked it, it was quite a bit longer than 15 minutes....

I had plenty of water under the paper, and the top was sealed.

 

8)

George

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of note, side comment or perhaps relevant, I don't know... I spent a LOT of time trying and trying different brands of local parchment / cooking paper in Argentina, and even when I found a couple that were OK, when somebody brought me Reynolds from the USA it was like magic happening in my palette. Get some if you can.

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The Mastersons paper is made for heavy artist's acrylics... our acrylics behave more like watercolor paints in a lot of ways so they don't work as well with the included paper.  That's why people recommend parchment paper.

Ah! Wish I had known that before I grabbed an extra pack of paper for the palette... :down:

Maybe I can find a use for it...

 

of note, side comment or perhaps relevant, I don't know... I spent a LOT of time trying and trying different brands of local parchment / cooking paper in Argentina, and even when I found a couple that were OK, when somebody brought me Reynolds from the USA it was like magic happening in my palette. Get some if you can.

Like this stuff?

post-14271-0-24503500-1441906803_thumb.jpg

This is bleached I think, as it looks almost white. I have used some that was more 'brown', I am guessing that is unbleached...

Not sure if one is better than another...

Reynolds is one of the most common brands for things like plastic wraps, plastic bags, aluminum foil etc. Stuff for sealing and storage in the kitchen. It is probably the company that makes the stuff for all the grocery stores to re-brand as well, but I don't know that...

 

8)

George

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The Mastersons paper is made for heavy artist's acrylics... our acrylics behave more like watercolor paints in a lot of ways so they don't work as well with the included paper.  That's why people recommend parchment paper.

Ah! Wish I had known that before I grabbed an extra pack of paper for the palette... :down:

Maybe I can find a use for it...

 

of note, side comment or perhaps relevant, I don't know... I spent a LOT of time trying and trying different brands of local parchment / cooking paper in Argentina, and even when I found a couple that were OK, when somebody brought me Reynolds from the USA it was like magic happening in my palette. Get some if you can.

Like this stuff?

attachicon.gif001.JPG

This is bleached I think, as it looks almost white. I have used some that was more 'brown', I am guessing that is unbleached...

Not sure if one is better than another...

Reynolds is one of the most common brands for things like plastic wraps, plastic bags, aluminum foil etc. Stuff for sealing and storage in the kitchen. It is probably the company that makes the stuff for all the grocery stores to re-brand as well, but I don't know that...

 

8)

George

 

As the others said, THAT is the stuff. I use it in my wet palette too!

 

As far as the masterson's goes, I actually use that paper to test my paint flow from my brush and to wipe of excess. It doesn't have fibers in it for the brush to pick up and it'll allow me to get the right amount on my figure without slathering too much on the figure. 

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As the others said, THAT is the stuff. I use it in my wet palette too!

 

As far as the masterson's goes, I actually use that paper to test my paint flow from my brush and to wipe of excess. It doesn't have fibers in it for the brush to pick up and it'll allow me to get the right amount on my figure without slathering too much on the figure. 

 

SEE, SEE!

I just knew that if I said I could maybe find a use for it, someone would Enable me to!

 

8)

George

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As the others said, THAT is the stuff. I use it in my wet palette too!

 

As far as the masterson's goes, I actually use that paper to test my paint flow from my brush and to wipe of excess. It doesn't have fibers in it for the brush to pick up and it'll allow me to get the right amount on my figure without slathering too much on the figure. 

 

SEE, SEE!

I just knew that if I said I could maybe find a use for it, someone would Enable me to!

 

8)

George

 

I'm full of it... err you know what I mean.  :poke:  ::P:  :lol:

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The palette paper included with the palettes is porous. This can be useful to thin paint by getting a little on the tip and then gently rolling and wiping the brush on the palette. It's good for getting a wash glaze consistency without overloading the brush

Edited by czebas
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