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Froggy the Great

Randomness VII: The Randomness Awakens

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Tella Ball Shake?? Nutella, Doughnut, Milkshake. It's popular and trending in Australia. I have to admit...I want one. What's everyone else's opinion?

 

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Wow :blink: ....

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Tella Ball Shake?? Nutella, Doughnut, Milkshake. It's popular and trending in Australia. I have to admit...I want one. What's everyone else's opinion?

 

o.jpg

 

I saw these on the youtubes, it was basically telling you how to make the crazy milkshakes that are popular in Aussie land right now. The lady said people will stand in line forever to get them. She showed on that had doughnuts on top of it. Look like a fast way to get a tummy ache. But a yummy tummy ache.... 

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So do you drop the doughnut into the milk shake to consume?

 

They didn't say, just told how to make them at home. I was thinking you would dunk the doughnuts.

 

They look so crazy....

 

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I gotta say... I love all those things (perhaps a little too much) on their own... But put them together, and it's just a little much for me, thanks. :blink: 

 

Got a giant cavity mostly cut out of one section of my workbench! Just gotta square off one corner (it's a big corner though) and then I can finally move on to the next part of the project. Woo! So naturally, I'm taking a break and then planning to reorganise my crafting areas. ::P: 

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The interesting part being, Fowler Schocken is not an evil man, despite the fact that he's been set up as the villain of the entire piece. Eventually, we find out that he's actually a rather kindly old man; he's not that much different from his public image. He's used to being a corporate icon, and still thinks of himself as the mover and shaker of his corporation, but the fact is that he has been supplanted by the Copysmiths, which is what Mitch is trying to tell him upon his return. Regrettably, Schocken has not realized that his business -- and his world -- has changed around him. He still thinks advertising is the same business he got into, way back in the twentieth century, as opposed to the world-shaping political engine it has become (that he HELPED it become). This is foreshadowed by the Coffiest campaign, in which we discover that the product has a "harmless alkaloid additive" to "ensure consumer loyalty." In short, Coffiest coffee is physically addictive. And Schocken sees nothing wrong with this; it's legal, after all, because he's one of the people who lobbied to MAKE it legal. Schocken still thinks of himself as a copywriter who made good and rose to the top, as opposed to one of the major architects of a dystopian society, and he is disinclined to accept any argument that runs counter to his own perceptions, which is what ultimately leads to his end... his own failure to perceive what he has made, and what he has become.

 

Surprisingly for the time, and the genre, he is a truly blind, tragic villain.

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The interesting part being, Fowler Schocken is not an evil man, despite the fact that he's been set up as the villain of the entire piece. Eventually, we find out that he's actually a rather kindly old man; he's not that much different from his public image. He's used to being a corporate icon, and still thinks of himself as the mover and shaker of his corporation, but the fact is that he has been supplanted by the Copysmiths, which is what Mitch is trying to tell him upon his return. Regrettably, Schocken has not realized that his business -- and his world -- has changed around him. He still thinks advertising is the same business he got into, way back in the twentieth century, as opposed to the world-shaping political engine it has become (that he HELPED it become). This is foreshadowed by the Coffiest campaign, in which we discover that the product has a "harmless alkaloid additive" to "ensure consumer loyalty." In short, Coffiest coffee is physically addictive. And Schocken sees nothing wrong with this; it's legal, after all, because he's one of the people who lobbied to MAKE it legal. Schocken still thinks of himself as a copywriter who made good and rose to the top, as opposed to one of the major architects of a dystopian society, and he is disinclined to accept any argument that runs counter to his own perceptions, which is what ultimately leads to his end... his own failure to perceive what he has made, and what he has become.

 

Surprisingly for the time, and the genre, he is a truly blind, tragic villain.

... I think I'm missing some context here...? 

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So 5e, reprising my role as the DM last night.

Three characters at level one.

TPK, with the Lost Mines of Phandelver introductory adventure.

 

That's never happened to me with a module before.

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The interesting part being, Fowler Schocken is not an evil man, despite the fact that he's been set up as the villain of the entire piece. Eventually, we find out that he's actually a rather kindly old man; he's not that much different from his public image. He's used to being a corporate icon, and still thinks of himself as the mover and shaker of his corporation, but the fact is that he has been supplanted by the Copysmiths, which is what Mitch is trying to tell him upon his return. Regrettably, Schocken has not realized that his business -- and his world -- has changed around him. He still thinks advertising is the same business he got into, way back in the twentieth century, as opposed to the world-shaping political engine it has become (that he HELPED it become). This is foreshadowed by the Coffiest campaign, in which we discover that the product has a "harmless alkaloid additive" to "ensure consumer loyalty." In short, Coffiest coffee is physically addictive. And Schocken sees nothing wrong with this; it's legal, after all, because he's one of the people who lobbied to MAKE it legal. Schocken still thinks of himself as a copywriter who made good and rose to the top, as opposed to one of the major architects of a dystopian society, and he is disinclined to accept any argument that runs counter to his own perceptions, which is what ultimately leads to his end... his own failure to perceive what he has made, and what he has become.

 

Surprisingly for the time, and the genre, he is a truly blind, tragic villain.

... I think I'm missing some context here...? 

 

 

I was curious, so I hit the Google. 

 

He is giving his opinion of the antagonist in the Novel The Space Merchants by Pohl and Kornbluth. I have never heard of it, but it appears to be a pinnacle piece of science fiction. 

 

I am intrigued enough to possibly check it out.

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:blink:

 

Those Australian milkshakes look horrible, far too big and gooey and terribly messy.

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:blink:

 

Those Australian milkshakes look horrible, far too big and gooey and terribly messy.

 

You are not supposed to need a fork and a spoon to consume a milk-shake. And if it needs a saucer the size of a plate to contain the mess somebody is doing something wrong.

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