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So What Have you Read Lately? And other favorite books!

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So,

I got quite a few responses when I asked about what people listen to, now I want to know what you READ!

I mean we can't always be painting minis, otherwise no one would be filling up the forums with questions and pictures....ETC

 

I am assuming that most folks have read Tolkien, I mean can you be into fantasy minis and games without having read them???? :blink:

 

But some others that some people might or might not have read and enjoyed or hated...

 

Heroes Die, By Mathew Woodring Stover. 

I used to work for B&N, and as my staff recommendation I picked this book with the claim "If you don't like this book, I will buy it back from you out of my own pocket!" I sold a lot of books, NEVER bought one back...

The jacket blurb says "Day of the Jackal meats Lord of the Rings!"

Believe it!

 

Three Hearts and Three Lions, By Poul Anderson

Just finished it for the Nth time, great book

 

Thieves World, Edited by Robert Aspirin

This is a 12 book shared universe series. Chaosium Games made a multi game supplement based on the first 1 or 2 books.

The cover art of the first books is AWESOME!

 

The Eternal Champion Cycle, By Michael Moorcock

This includes Erekose, Elric, Corum, Hawkmoon, etc Really something every fantasy buff should read....

MM also writes music with Blue Oyster Cult, and has /had a band called Hawkwind. A very nice British Gentleman!

 

Name of the Wind, By Patrick Rothfuss

The best new fantasy author to come along in a very long time! Read it, and the sequel, "A Wise Man's Fears"

 

Jack of Shadows, By Roger Zelazny

Most folks have read about Amber, This book is as good as the original Ambers...

 

I will add more as I find time...

Gotta paint now!

 

8)

George

 

 

 

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I'm currently re-reading my copy of The Hobbit for the nth time where n equals a number I'm not sure of anymore.

 

Haven't pulled it off the bookshelf in a while and was surprised how much all the pages have yellowed.

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I'm currently re-reading my copy of The Hobbit for the nth time where n equals a number I'm not sure of anymore.

 

Haven't pulled it off the bookshelf in a while and was surprised how much all the pages have yellowed.

Yup, I have read the "BOOKS" once a year for over 35 years....

I call it my annual pilgrimage to Middle Earth....

I usually find something new each time....

Either that or my memory is getting worse....

 

8)

George

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I'm currently re-reading my copy of The Hobbit for the nth time where n equals a number I'm not sure of anymore.

Haven't pulled it off the bookshelf in a while and was surprised how much all the pages have yellowed.

 

Yup, I have read the "BOOKS" once a year for over 35 years....

I call it my annual pilgrimage to Middle Earth....

I usually find something new each time....

Either that or my memory is getting worse....

 

Christopher Lee has stated he does the same.

 

(about reading the "BOOKS" once a year, not about doubting his memory)

 

:;):

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Hmmm lately I've been reading a lot of comics actually, like Fables and Walking Dead and Conan.

 

I would like to reread Shogun soon. But I do need some quiet time for that.

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Finished Will Thomas' Anatomy of Evil the other day. I like the series but this is not his best work to date.  Prior to that it was an old favorite, Agent of Change by Lee & Miller. They have a series of about 15 books I am trying to re-read.  Started Charles Stross' Resus Chart but have not been able to sit down and give it the attention it requires. 

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If you haven't read Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, you're missing a beautiful, haunting, and enthralling book. While the book is about loss (it is, after all, about civilization's collapse), there are also threads of hope, relationships, and finding purpose,

 

The book brings to mind a series of Chinese watercolor paintings with just enough color and stroke to evoke a vivid image without too much detail.

 

Fair warning: the novel starts out linearly enough, but eventually jumps around a bit in time (on a chapter or part basis) to introduce back stories and details as needed. How all of the perspective characters are interconnected through a single actor stretches a bit, but the novel is still lovely.

 

If you're inclined, you can pick up the Audible narration for a discount if you pick up the Kindle version first. The Audible version has a terrific narrator.

 

Ron

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I just reread my favorite Jane Austin book, Persuasion. Every time I read it, it strikes me how different it is from her other novels, in that Anne is so introverted compared to Austin's other leading ladies. That's probably why I like it more...

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I read Michael Chabon's _Summerland_ for the first time last weekend, a "kids in magical country" YA. It was the first new fantasy I've read in a while. I'm past the point where just another epic trilogy appeals to me; I can reread Tolkien for that...

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The Laundry Series, by Charles Stross. British secret agents vs. the Cthulhu Mythos. Veers between hilarious and terrifying.

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I read Ann Leckie's Ancillary Justice this summer. It's award-winning space opera whose narrator is a formerly gigantic ship's A.I. stranded in a single human body that it hardly notices is female. It's on a mission of revenge for being forced to kill its favorite officer by the immortal emperor whose consciousness is spread through thousands of genetically identical bodies scattered through the galaxy.

 

The emperor him- or herself (Gender is considered unimportant in the ruling civilization of the empire; one of the A.I.'s most difficult struggles is to work out what gender other humans are and use the correct pronouns so that she is not "outed" as a despised imperial; we never learn what some characters' genders are) has become something like schizophrenic as different bodies with different memories and awarenesses have drifted into warring factions, all of whom have the power to command absolute obedience of regular citizens and A.I.s.

 

Part of the fun is that the A.I. has human emotions but is basically unaware of them, so that at times she does things and is uncertain why. One has to read between the lines of her obliviousness to realize that, for example, someone has fallen in love with her.

 

It's a fun piece of well-thought-out space opera with an amusingly skewed perspective.

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I read Ann Leckie's Ancillary Justice this summer. It's award-winning space opera whose narrator is a formerly gigantic ship's A.I. stranded in a single human body that it hardly notices is female. It's on a mission of revenge for being forced to kill its favorite officer by the immortal emperor whose consciousness is spread through thousands of genetically identical bodies scattered through the galaxy.

 

The emperor him- or herself (Gender is considered unimportant in the ruling civilization of the empire; one of the A.I.'s most difficult struggles is to work out what gender other humans are and use the correct pronouns so that she is not "outed" as a despised imperial; we never learn what some characters' genders are) has become something like schizophrenic as different bodies with different memories and awarenesses have drifted into warring factions, all of whom have the power to command absolute obedience of regular citizens and A.I.s.

 

Part of the fun is that the A.I. has human emotions but is basically unaware of them, so that at times she does things and is uncertain why. One has to read between the lines of her obliviousness to realize that, for example, someone has fallen in love with her.

 

It's a fun piece of well-thought-out space opera with an amusingly skewed perspective.

That was such a good book!!

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