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Wet Pallet... Painting will never be the same..


CoolAliasHere
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I made up a small "travel" wet palette pretty easily. It's made from 3 things:

To prep, I will put the parchment paper in the bottom of the dry plastic container, then I will put the wet folded up paper towel on top of it, then I will fill it up with hot water and let soak for about 10 minutes. Then I will drain the water mostly and just grab the parchment below and hold to the paper towel and flip it so that the parchment is now on top, use my fingers to get rid of any air bubbles between and make sure the water level isn't too high where it'd get between the paper towel and the parchment paper. 

 

This method I've been using for about a week without any problems and it holds quite a bit of paint on the palette, about 1/3 the size of my normal Masterson's wet palette that I have packed up right now.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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Today I finally broke down and made myself a wet pallet.  I am not sure what took me so long, but I will never paint without one again.   Thinning paints is almost completely unneeded now, and blending has become so much easier.  I have even started creating colors on the pallet itself layering purposes.  I am so thankful for these forums, as I would never have even thought about it were it not for posts here.  My next investment will be some really good brushes.  I am still doing to some research, and currently I have some Princeton Art brushes.  They are getting the job done, but I am interested in looking into some others and see how they react.

 

So, in closing, thank you to everyone in this wonderful community!  You are all great with your advice, tutorials, and encouragements.  I am glad to be a member of this community, and look forward to a long future of painting and learning!

 

Sean

AKA CoolAliasHere

 

They are practically required in Colorado.  You don't need them, but it is nice not watching your paint dry up 10 minutes later if you aren't using it very actively.  I still switch between both though.

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Do you need to soak the parchment paper?

 

I noticed the Masterson's instructions are kind of elaborate, calling for long hot soaks. But their paper is not parchment paper. I have no idea what it is and wasn't planning on using it.

 

I find a modest wetting of the parchment baking paper on both sides (to prevent curling) before laying ot on the wet sponge / paper towel seems to suit my needs just fine.

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Do you need to soak the parchment paper?

 

I noticed the Masterson's instructions are kind of elaborate, calling for long hot soaks. But their paper is not parchment paper. I have no idea what it is and wasn't planning on using it.

 

I find a modest wetting of the parchment baking paper on both sides (to prevent curling) before laying ot on the wet sponge / paper towel seems to suit my needs just fine.

I soak my parchment paper, it's a carry-over from the Masterson's thing, but I do notice that it makes the paper more able to pass the water through and keep the paint workable longer in my very low humidity region. 

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Do you need to soak the parchment paper?

 

I noticed the Masterson's instructions are kind of elaborate, calling for long hot soaks. But their paper is not parchment paper. I have no idea what it is and wasn't planning on using it.

 

I find a modest wetting of the parchment baking paper on both sides (to prevent curling) before laying ot on the wet sponge / paper towel seems to suit my needs just fine.

I have never gotten the Masterson's stuff to work, even following their directions.  I just went with grocery store parchment. :D  Another painter here has nothing but good luck with that paper though.

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Do you need to soak the parchment paper?

 

I noticed the Masterson's instructions are kind of elaborate, calling for long hot soaks. But their paper is not parchment paper. I have no idea what it is and wasn't planning on using it.

 

I find a modest wetting of the parchment baking paper on both sides (to prevent curling) before laying ot on the wet sponge / paper towel seems to suit my needs just fine.

I have never gotten the Masterson's stuff to work, even following their directions.  I just went with grocery store parchment. :D  Another painter here has nothing but good luck with that paper though.

 

I don't like the Masterson's either. It's now what i use to wipe my brush off on and make sure I have the right paint consistency and take excess off. Couldn't ever get the paper to transfer very well even after following their directions. The Reynolds Parchment is 100x better IMO AND cheaper!

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Yeah, tried the provided paper and found it lacking as well. I think it was meant for something other than miniature paints.

 

I do soak the parchment paper. Well, wet it under the faucet at least. Helps it lay flat initially on the sponge. Then I use little cut strips of another wet pallet sponge to hold down the edges.

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+1 not a fan of the masterson paper.

 

Parchment paper is ideal if you can find a brand that works well, but in my experience this can be somewhat hit-or-miss, as different brands use different methods of construction. If you can't find parchment paper which behaves the way you want it to, you may want to consider special-purpose palette paper from windsor and newton or P3.

Edited by althai
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I use Reynolds parchment paper (US). I give it a quick soak, maybe a minute. Doesn't really need it. Mostly just making sure it's immersed and then flipping it once takes care of any curling issues. Smoothing it out and removing any bubbles also helps with wrinkling.

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Just an update.

 

One pre-1983 copper penny was not sufficient to inhibit mildew in a roughly four inch by six inch palette over a period of a few weeks. I may try again with two pennies. Also, the penny colored the paper towel green above it.

 

However ... I am reminded that certain pigments have antiseptic properties. The only one I know for certain is Zinc White, which is not used in acrylic paints on the whole.

 

But I just realized a fairly sizeable (paper plate) palette of reds and yellows has been sitting in my studio for well over a month with little to no sign of mold.

 

It may be that one or more pigments on the palette is inhibiting mold growth.

 

Colors on the palette include Titanium White (a very small amount), Hansa Yellow, Yellow Oxide, Raw Sienna, Mars Orange, Mars Red, Quinacridone Crimson, Quinacridone Magenta, and Pyrrole Orange.

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If you just want to keep your mold at bay, I can vouch for the effectiveness of a squirt of hydrogen peroxide.

 

I used to have mold spots in my pallette after a day or two, but once I started adding a squirt of H2O2 to the water under the paper, I can go over a month with no signs of mold.

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I stand by my recommendation to use a couple of pieces of stripped copper wire as an anti-fungal. Good surface area, easy to find in my house (YHMV  ^_^ ), and it's essentially free. Since I went to that from pennies, I haven't had any problems with mold (though I'm getting a bit of verdigris build-up in the corners of the palette). I also use paper towels instead of sponges for two reasons: they're (well they can be and mine are) neutral in color rather than the yellow of the Masterson sponge, which I find useful when mixing color, and I just throw them out when I throw out the parchment.

 

I also mix with whatever brush I have in my hand, which is typically a premium Kolinsky, but I'm normally working with very small quantities of paint and I usually wash my brushes out with Master's at the end of every painting session. I haven't had any problems with brushes failing me quickly (typical life is 2-3 years). Again, your circumstances might cause you to make different choices.

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I have recently tried something new...

I put the Masterson's paper on the sponge and then the bakers parchment on top of that.

It's holding my over thinning from absorbtion to almost nothing...

It also removesthe yellow cast of the sponge.

I have also started using a bit of H2O2 in my palette, and it seems to be helpful.

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