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The Messenger of the Spiral Path


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He looks really good, the muscle definition in particular stands out as well done.  The hair, chains, and shading on the pants also came out nice.  The bright cape is good, but I think I would have liked the creases a little bit darker.  To me it makes the highlights stand out all the better.

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Thanks for the comments everyone!

 

 

Looks good aku-chan. You didn't paint his mask red or flames on the bottom half of the cape?

 

 

Wow!  He looks like some sort of anime bishounen villain archetype.  :D  I love the vibrant red on that cape!

 

The mini is inspired by the character Kamina from the anime Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann.

 

I actually wasn't planning on copying Kaminas colour scheme, it just kinda happened, hence the little differences.

I'd hate to see the mess I'd make trying to paint freehand flames!

 

He looks really good, the muscle definition in particular stands out as well done.  The hair, chains, and shading on the pants also came out nice.  The bright cape is good, but I think I would have liked the creases a little bit darker.  To me it makes the highlights stand out all the better.

 

Thanks!

As I said in the opening post, I struggle with capes. I'm okay with deep folds and sharp creases, but when they have gentle curves like this I have no idea how to handle them.

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Thanks!

As I said in the opening post, I struggle with capes. I'm okay with deep folds and sharp creases, but when they have gentle curves like this I have no idea how to handle them.

 

Aw yeah, I hear you on that.  I have yet to manage a decent approach.  So far, my experimentation in such circumstances has either amounted to:

 

1) Ignore it!  Maybe nobody will notice.

 

2) Try a wash.  This almost never works.  Then follow up with dry-brushing.  This usually makes it worse.

 

3) Try "wet-blending" the area.  I have yet to figure out the magical methods of making the paint go the way I want it to when I do this.

 

4) Use very translucent colors to apply a soft gradient to the shading with multiple applications.  Usually this involves borrowing a friend's more expensive paints, as most of my paints are either heavily opaque, kind-of-translucent-but-not-enough-for-this, or else watery-and-only-good-for-washes.  I've gotten some middling results using this method on the rare occasion I've employed it, but the demands of my schedule combined with the small windows I have for sitting down and painting minis conspire to dissuade me from this approach most of the time.

 

5) Similar to #4, but instead of applying translucent paints, I have two blobs of color in my palette -- the cloak/robe/flag/whatever background color, and the shaded color -- and I spend a lot of time mixing the area between them on the palette to come up with some mid-tone color, and I spend a lot of time going back-and-forth on the cloak/robe/whatever trying to paint a soft gradient.  The result sometimes looks passable at a distance, but my gradients are usually very obvious when I try taking a close-up photo.  Also, one problem I have is that sometimes my acrylics will develop a "skin" on the surface if I'm at this for too long, and tiny bits of half-dried paint will end up as impurities that I have to waste a bunch of time trying to clean off of the figure (or else there are "crumbs" despoiling the otherwise very, very smooth surface).

 

I suppose if this were my "day job," I'd eventually get the handle of it, but it's a rare enough thing for me to bother even dealing with that I haven't really settled upon a proper approach yet.

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Thanks!

As I said in the opening post, I struggle with capes. I'm okay with deep folds and sharp creases, but when they have gentle curves like this I have no idea how to handle them.

 

Aw yeah, I hear you on that.  I have yet to manage a decent approach.  So far, my experimentation in such circumstances has either amounted to:

 

1) Ignore it!  Maybe nobody will notice.

 

2) Try a wash.  This almost never works.  Then follow up with dry-brushing.  This usually makes it worse.

 

3) Try "wet-blending" the area.  I have yet to figure out the magical methods of making the paint go the way I want it to when I do this.

 

4) Use very translucent colors to apply a soft gradient to the shading with multiple applications.  Usually this involves borrowing a friend's more expensive paints, as most of my paints are either heavily opaque, kind-of-translucent-but-not-enough-for-this, or else watery-and-only-good-for-washes.  I've gotten some middling results using this method on the rare occasion I've employed it, but the demands of my schedule combined with the small windows I have for sitting down and painting minis conspire to dissuade me from this approach most of the time.

 

5) Similar to #4, but instead of applying translucent paints, I have two blobs of color in my palette -- the cloak/robe/flag/whatever background color, and the shaded color -- and I spend a lot of time mixing the area between them on the palette to come up with some mid-tone color, and I spend a lot of time going back-and-forth on the cloak/robe/whatever trying to paint a soft gradient.  The result sometimes looks passable at a distance, but my gradients are usually very obvious when I try taking a close-up photo.  Also, one problem I have is that sometimes my acrylics will develop a "skin" on the surface if I'm at this for too long, and tiny bits of half-dried paint will end up as impurities that I have to waste a bunch of time trying to clean off of the figure (or else there are "crumbs" despoiling the otherwise very, very smooth surface).

 

I suppose if this were my "day job," I'd eventually get the handle of it, but it's a rare enough thing for me to bother even dealing with that I haven't really settled upon a proper approach yet.

 

 

Thanks for the advice!

Yeah, I really need to learn how to do gradients properly, but I'm so impatient and lazy.

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Marike's detail class last ReaperCon showed a quick way to get that blend. We worked one shade of the paint into the brush, then dipped the point in another. Turn the bristles sideways and stroke along the already basecoated fold. It made for a really quick blend. But even with that quick technique, I'm not sure there is much contrast to really be had with such a shallow dip in the fabric. In that case I would have gone with the main focus of that class: little squiggles in patterns.

 

Still, it's a very nice job. His abs really stood out to me as photogenic.

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That is one weird line of figures. Do they ever explain the spikes on the shoes?

 

He looks intriguing and mischievous in a weird way. I love that red cloak and the blue trousers.

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