Jump to content

DethStruck

Stripping minis with Simple Green

Recommended Posts

Thx. Looks good.

 

So simple green is just liquid green soap right?

No. It's a household cleaner.

 

Looks like this:

2700000113033.jpg

 

Pine-sol also works the same as Simple Green.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple green is the only thing I use anymore to strip models.  even had some luck with stripping resin models (short soak time, very light scrubbing - they do tend to soften and get a bit brittle after they re-harden, though)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did use some thicker orange goo (can't remember the name) to strip painted minis, though I can't say it worked any better than Simple Green.

 

I haven't tried it on resin, but I've used undiluted Simple Green on both metal and plastic miniatures with no ill effect.  Note that the "bathwater" of Simple Green seems to lose its potency as figures have been stripped in it, as a subsequent batch of figures in the same bath seemed to take much longer to achieve the same level of paint-stripping.

 

There was one batch of figures I picked up on eBay that seemed completely resistant to any kind of paint removal.  Or rather, the paint came off fine, but the primer refused to come off even with prolonged Simple Green baths and vigorous scrubbing.  I have no idea what the previous owner used on his figures, but apparently that stuff was the god-mode of primers!  :blink:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used Simple Green on my first couple of minis after spraying too much primer on them, got the idea on the forums and at the Bones kickstarter's comments section. Did the 24 hour bit, did a quick shake of the mini in the SG every so often to really get it to work into the paint. 24 hours later, used old toothbrush to clean the mini off, did another soak to get over the little bits left, and voila: perfectly new mini again. I washed in in soap and water afterwards to make sure it was clean of any residue, but it works perfectly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the extra input you all. I haven't worked on any resin models yet so I'll keep that in mind for the future.

 

The primer on the Prosecutor didn't fully come off either. It was also much harder to scrub due to thin plastic parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The primer on the Prosecutor didn't fully come off either. It was also much harder to scrub due to thin plastic parts.

A sonic bath can help get the primer off of thin/delicate parts and recessed areas brushes are not working on.

You can put the solvent (in this case Simple Green) in a glass container and put that container a water filled sonic bath to conserve how much sovent you use and protect the bath from more aggresive solvents.

 

There was one batch of figures I picked up on eBay that seemed completely resistant to any kind of paint removal. Or rather, the paint came off fine, but the primer refused to come off even with prolonged Simple Green baths and vigorous scrubbing. I have no idea what the previous owner used on his figures, but apparently that stuff was the god-mode of primers! :blink:

People make very strange decisions when painting things so it could be anything.

If people will paint their car with oil based house paint (it does not dry) they will try anything.

 

These are some of the common possibilities that I thought of.

If they are metal it could be a fired enamel which some companies uses as a final coat to protect metal castings not marketed as miniatures.

Powder Coat is also possible on metal but I don't know how much use it gets on this kind of stuff.

It could also be a epoxy primer which is harder to remove, you need to use a stronger paint stripper than Simple Green that would probably destroy non-metal figures.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use beading needles to reach into crevices a toothbrush can't. Generally I can lift the paint right out, but the thin needles break easily so gotta be careful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use beading needles to reach into crevices a toothbrush can't. Generally I can lift the paint right out, but the thin needles break easily so gotta be careful.

Hand quilting needles are tiny but way tougher than beading needles.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did use some thicker orange goo (can't remember the name) to strip painted minis, though I can't say it worked any better than Simple Green.

 

I haven't tried it on resin, but I've used undiluted Simple Green on both metal and plastic miniatures with no ill effect.  Note that the "bathwater" of Simple Green seems to lose its potency as figures have been stripped in it, as a subsequent batch of figures in the same bath seemed to take much longer to achieve the same level of paint-stripping.

 

There was one batch of figures I picked up on eBay that seemed completely resistant to any kind of paint removal.  Or rather, the paint came off fine, but the primer refused to come off even with prolonged Simple Green baths and vigorous scrubbing.  I have no idea what the previous owner used on his figures, but apparently that stuff was the god-mode of primers!  :blink:

I've also had great difficulty getting primer off of some eBay purchases. I've come to the conclusion based off the age of the minis that it is almost always automobile primer. I actually knew a few people bitd that used to do exactly that as there was no miniature primers.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a side note. As of one to two years ago Pine-sol no longer works for stripping minis. The formula was changed removing the pine oil, the actual ingredient that allowed it to strip paint. Walmart here in the U.S. has their own brand that does have pine oil in sufficient amount to still work as a paint stripper. I learned about the issue with Pine-sol after purchasing three new bottles.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Painting Dog
      I'm pretty sure I already know the answer, but it never hurts to get confirmation. . When stripping paint from a mini (in this case a Bones that I completely screwed up the paint job on), is it necessary to get every molecule of paint off? Or is it okay if there's some bits left in some of the crenalations and under bits?
       
      Thanks!
    • By MonsterSlayer
      I have been away from painting and these boards for a while.
       
      I recently got back into painting and started with some of the bones 3 ogres. I made a rookie mistake with bad lighting and decided they had to go in the Simple Green bath.
       
      The ones that I based coated with brown cleaned fairly well.The armored ogres had Vallejo Coal Black and the stuff will not come off after 36 hours.That is not even a primer, just black model paint.
       
      So has anyone had this problem? Do I need to step up the cleaning solution to acetone free nail polish remover? Brake fluid? Has anyone tried nail polish remover or brake fluid on the Bones? how does the plastic react?
    • By Cranky Dog
      So I've finally joined. Ebonwrath was the first dragon I managed to grab from my pile of Bones. Now assembled and brown line primed.
       
      Here are the results, based on my modified list.

      15: Alien Goo, main
      3: HD Fireball Orange, secondary
      17: Solid Blue, accent

       
      So this is YOUR doing Pezler!
       
      Guess I'll try for the 3* challenge. It'll feel like my early days of painting when I owned a very limited palette.
    • By Thrym
      "Old Made New"
       
      This is for those of you who need inspiration (as usual) to pull some of those ancient pieces from your collection and give them a new life.
       
      Post the following:
      A Before Shot of the mini.  Whatever it had for a paint job before it went for a dip. (Optional) Post a mid-point shot.  Right after coming out or perhaps another day in solitary.  Or a mid cleaning process shot.  Paint specs everywhere. An After Shot of the mini.  The clean and ready for paint shot. I'll start this off. 
       
      This is my original Tom Meier Blue Dragon (DG3).  I bought this mini at a hobby shop here in Seneca Falls, NY after riding my bicycle from Waterloo to Seneca Falls (3.8 miles) when I was 12 to buy my first miniature.  It was in a blister pack and came with DragonScale Wax that you could rub into it to make it blue.  Which I originally did.  Sorry no photo of that.
       
      Here is a photo of the original packaging I found online:
       

       
      The stamp on the bottom of the mini says Meier on it so I know it's not the re-release under Ral Partha and now Iron Wind Metals.
       
      On to the BEFORE shot:
       

       
      Now that's been sitting on a shelf somewhere wherever I've lived since it's last "repaint" somewhere back in the early 90s.
       
      The base was a piece of wood my grandfather gave me to use, that I sanded down and glued him to.  I think I used plastic cement glue.
       
      Oh, and that's Testors paints.  Which was pretty much all that was available around here back in the day.  I did acquire a few Polly S paints but not that cyan blue or bright yellow.
       
      Now here's an IN BETWEEN shot ... freshly pulled from the Simple Green after two days:
       

       
      Pretty gruesome.  I don't know how well Testors enamel paints come off in Simple Green but it did have the DragonScale Wax previously and might account for his ... uh ... "condition."
       
      Finally, the cleaned up AFTER shot:
       

       
      So there you have it.  The journey of a dragon from my youth through to today.  Stay tuned for his WIP and Enjoy.
       
      GET MOTIVATED!
    • By Thrym
      Giant Mountain Troll The Old Troll and the Boar   I cleaned, repaired and repainted a long time baddy from our gaming sessions, Reaper's Giant Mountain Troll.  He had fallen to the floor a few times over the years and had a gloss coat instead of a matte coat for a sealer.  So he was quite due for the treatment.
       
      Given his look and feel, I decided to paint him as an older troll.  His skin is duller.  His hair receding considerably.  He hasn't fought anyone in a long time.  Even the boar for his dinner wasn't much of a hunt.  So he's kept his clothing in relatively good repair and found and made some better furs to wear.  He still prefers his old stone axe.  He was happy to find some stone laced with mithral to make a new axe head for it though.
        You can check out the WIP post to see everything I did to get him here.  WIP  
      The ol'boy will return to the carry case to stand before those pesky fellas from yonder cities and protect his mountain or wherever he gets plopped down.
       

       

       

       
      Enjoy.
       
      Check him out in the Inspiration Gallery. (Approved)
       
      Added to Thrym's Index of Reaper Miniatures & Thrym's General Show Off List
  • Who's Online   21 Members, 2 Anonymous, 34 Guests (See full list)

×