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The Monday Miniature: 2015


TaleSpinner
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There are a tremendous number of things I could mention as amazing in thus mini...I'm always a fan of Erin's work. What really strikes me is the patterning on the spider.

 

This is an excellent example of the way incredibly simple things can set off a mini. The high contrast from near-opposite sides of the traditional color wheel in the tawny patches; the completely simple but monstrously effective use of freehand patterns in the dark chevrons; and the repetition of the color on the knees. With the blends Erin is capable of, leaving the whole thing blue would have been pretty spectacular...the addition of the warm patches kicks the whole thing up several notches.

 

ETA: on rereading my above, I just want to reinforce my point (which, true as this is, is not just "Erin paints incredibly well"): the things that really make this spider pop are really simple tweaks that don't require years of experience or Faustian pacts; anyone can take a mini and apply some well-placed accent colors or easy freehand to bring up the level of the paint job.

Edited by Sanael
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Oooh I love the blues and the entire piece. But I would love to know what Corporea used for the base it looks to have a translucent quality. And the blue painted on it helps everything blend so seem less . The webbing also sets off the base work. Love the whole piece and it looks to be on a gaming base making me think I need to do this type of base for my spiders.

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Love the blues, and yeah I second the enquiry of Marsya, that basing is just what pulls the whole figure together, the off angle, makes it look so real that it would just scramble towards you! The eyes, subtle and perfect effect. I need to make these kind of choices when painting, instead of something too contrasting, or just black with a hilight.

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At the risk of being the negative one (because I do love this piece, there's so much that went right!)...

 

I think the bottom of the blue spectrum is a bit lacking. I'd like to see a bit more contrast in the deeper blue areas either by value or color. By that I mean using an even darker blue/black to define the darkest shadows, the legs just kind of blob into the abdomen; or using color to spice it up and remove some of the uniformity of color in the blue.

 

Also just a little more detail on the yellow knuckles, either light or dark.

 

But really, these are nit picks (the kind of thing I constantly find in my own painting, heh).

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At the risk of being the negative one (because I do love this piece, there's so much that went right!)...

 

I think the bottom of the blue spectrum is a bit lacking. I'd like to see a bit more contrast in the deeper blue areas either by value or color. By that I mean using an even darker blue/black to define the darkest shadows, the legs just kind of blob into the abdomen; or using color to spice it up and remove some of the uniformity of color in the blue.

 

Also just a little more detail on the yellow knuckles, either light or dark.

 

But really, these are nit picks (the kind of thing I constantly find in my own painting, heh).

I do agree the deepest shadows could go darker, possibly shifting toward a cold, deep/dark purple. Used sparingly, this could make those legs much more dramatic where they meet other parts of.the spider. I also feel this way about the eyes; the "gem" quality is spectacular, but they blend into the body rather more than I might like. As Cash says, nitpicks on a really lovely mini.

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I understand the concern about the contrast, but if this spider is supposed to be an ice or snow creature, softer shadows are more appropriate. Ice and snow diffuse light and soften shadows. That's one of the reasons shadows in snow appear blue.

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(Sorry this is late, I was traveling and just got back.)

 

Monday Miniature: 14212 Kristianna, Crusaders Warlord

 

IG_3371_1.jpg IG_3371_2.jpg

 

IG_3371_3.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Sean "Jabberwocky" Fulton
Sculpted by Bobby Jackson

 

 

What an awesome mini this week.  There is a lot to talk about on this one.  I'm going to start out with the TMM, but will loop around later in the week to discuss the awesome freehand.

 

Sean is a master at TMM (True Metal Metalics); just look at how real those swords look.  I really like this set of photos as the first two are at slightly different angles.  In them, you can see the light reflection shift on the belted sword and knee like it would on real metal.  You cannot get that effect with NMM. This adds a lot of realism to a mini.

 

I'll circle back tomorrow and discuss how this is done (or maybe Jabberwocky himself will chime in), but for now take it in and lets get your thoughts on it.

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What's not to love about that figure....free hand, remarkable tmm, (which I really have to practice, a heck of a lot more....)

Plus, yes the texture created in the red is subtle and creates a beautiful effect. Great Monday Mini!

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First of all, thanks to TaleSpinner for selecting one of my pieces for the Monday Miniature!

 

It is true that my preference when painting metals is using the TMM technique. I will be happy to answer any questions here about that (or anything else on Kristianna), but I did a brief step by step on the Reaper forums in the Painting Tips and Advice section covering how I do the "shaded metallics" technique (also referred to as "demi-metallics"). That step by step was really geared more toward addressing the wide range of contrast critical to a good metallic effect, which is essential in both NMM and TMM. In a nutshell, it is using opaque, non metallic colors to reduce the reflectivity of the metallic paint to provide that contrast from black (or near black) up to pure white for the light reflection points. I learned the technique initially from pieces done by Sebastian Archer, known as Automaton on CoolMiniorNot. He did an article in the tutorial section over there that does a much more detailed explanation of the technique.

Edited by Jabberwocky
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