Jump to content

The Monday Miniature: 2015


TaleSpinner
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Moderator

02967 Alastriel, the Forest's Wrath

 

IG_144_1.jpg IG_144_2.jpg

 

Painted by Derek Schubert
Sculpted by Werner Klocke
 
 
 
I've heard is said by some that miniature painting isn't art; it's more paint-by-numbers on someone else's art.  I don't agree with that sentiment, in fact I see a lot of artistry in the painting that just wasn't a part of the original sculpt, bringing said piece to a whole new level.  I think, instead, one could look at miniatures as collaborative art, with the sketch artist, sculptor, and painters working to bring little motes of beauty into the world.
 
This piece really does this for me.  I feel fairly certain that Mr. Klocke never envisioned this piece as a druid, and yet just look how Derek thoroughly transformed her.  The vision and power in this piece, and the synergy of a great sculpt and inspired painter pull this piece into something that inspires me, and hopefully you as well. 
 
As a sculptor, that is the part I love best; seeing how you all take my vision and make them your own, adding to the art in ways that far outstrip my original intent.  Well, back to the studio; I've got more blank canvases to make.
  • Like 15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 107
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Couldn't agree more, the painting can enhance/transform a sculpt (or totally wreck it as well). The painting in this piece is superb, very limited palette, yet nothing is lost or muddy on the sculpt details. I particularly appreciate the restrained OSL, it's an effect that sometimes it's overused

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very cool mini for this Monday. I love DKS' work, he's always an inspiration. You tell the absolute trooth that any/all of these figures you amazing sculptors make can be done in infinite ways, the only limitations are your imagination. It's great when someone paints one up that you've never thought it could look like and add so much more to the piece and tell a different story. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Artists

Going back to last week's topic a bit, sorry!

 

I think part of it has to do with the fact that our "canvas" is so clearly pre-defined. A painter starts with nothing but an idea, and everything put on canvas (paper, masonite, whatever) is filtered through that idea before becoming visible. For minis painters, our ideas have to be filtered through the sculpt; we have to work very hard to avoid a "realistic" mode, because in some respects, we're just coloring within the lines*. 

 

I think this is a big factor limiting what we can do. The edges of our sculpture are hard by the nature of the sculpt being a tangible 3D object. I don't know that it's impossible to ever do something soft and diffuse like a watercolour in miniature, because people keep finding ways to do all kinds of things I don't have the imagination to envision, but the deck seems stacked against doing it very easily, at the least! It's also pretty easy for textural paint strokes like Corporea described to blot out the detail on our little canvases. 

An additional issue is that unless you paint up a full diorama (and a box diorama if you really want to control it), we don't get much background to work with, just a base. That can have a pretty big impact on your options for colour schemes, being 'painterly', and setting moods. 

I'd say the size of a piece also is a big contributing factor. I don't think it's an accident that we're seeing an increase in pushing of boundaries and discussions like these at the same time as we're seeing a lot of the more interested in art than game painters working on busts and at scales a lot larger than gaming scale. It's a lot trickier to do this kind of painting and effect on a gaming scale miniature, and even trickier for the viewer to not only 'get' it, but to even SEE it. The piece we're talking about is a bust, a head several times larger than the ones we're painting on gaming scale figures. Cash's interpretation of that style on the Kingdom Death figure is well done, but it's not as immediately striking nor as obvious that he's doing that intentionally, and that's simply because of the difference in scale. The improvements in ease and quality of photographing miniatures are probably the main reason we're seeing as much of it on gaming scale figures as we are - photos allow you to see things you might not easily spot looking at something tiny in person. (Which possibly applies to a lot of what Bohun does, too. Or sculptors, for that matter, I've seen sculpts that look great in big blown up pics on the internet, but then that super fine detail just kind of falls flat in the hand.)

Interestingly, the more cell shaded type of thing has a longer history in miniature painting than some might be aware of. There's a segment of the historical gaming painters who use what is called the Foundry or Dallimore style of painting. Kevin Dallimore was the lead catalog painter for the company Wargames Foundry company in England. In the Foundry style of painting, figures are primed black, and then each area is painted up with no more than three colours, leaving the black showing for lining. The darkest colour is painted over the black, and the next two are carefully placed to create as much volume as possible given the limitations. 

This is a link to a YouTube review of the guide book Foundry sells on painting in this fashion. (I think there's a second book, too.) Foundry also sells paints in sets of three to make it easier to paint in this fashion. I have this book, and I will tell you right now that it would be very challenging for me to paint in this manner, as I do not easily paint with the kind of precision that it requires. I suspect I'd paint more quickly and easily if I had worked to try to paint with this sort of discipline early in my career. 



That's a bit of an older video, so in case you can't get a good look at the effect in the pictures shown as he's leafing through the book, I'm also going to link to a page of figures painted by Kevin Dallimore. Actually it's the same figure painted in a number of different schemes. If you click the pictures, you'll see each in a larger view where you can see the placement of the highlights. This is shown much larger than what is usually done. The painters of this style are generally much more interested in how things look in real life and ranked up on a table than whether they look great individually in large photos.

http://www.salute.co.uk/archive/salute2004/painting_hannibal.htm

The existence of the style may be partly why more 'art' oriented painters aren't as open to thinking of this as a contest winning style. Traditionally it's been practiced by historical army painters who often eschew 'artsy' ideas, and who tend to emphasize speed and quantity over detail and artistic message or mood. What Banshee's doing is definitely a different thing, it's much more about the mood and light. But if you take that idea, applied to a gaming scale figure by a painter of more intermediate level skill than Banshee, and it's as likely to look more like the Foundry approach than the Banshee bust.
 
  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The existence of the style may be partly why more 'art' oriented painters aren't as open to thinking of this as a contest winning style. Traditionally it's been practiced by historical army painters who often eschew 'artsy' ideas, and who tend to emphasize speed and quantity over detail and artistic message or mood. What Banshee's doing is definitely a different thing, it's much more about the mood and light. But if you take that idea, applied to a gaming scale figure by a painter of more intermediate level skill than Banshee, and it's as likely to look more like the Foundry approach than the Banshee bust.

Explained this way, I understand the "paint by numbers" point of view.

 

If you want to paint a historically accurate looking British army, they you're going to paint them like the real army, using the exact same colors schemes at the same places.

 

Otherwise, it's back to a shapely blank canvas, and yours to make whatever you want.

Edited by Cranky Dog
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know how I've missed this piece of Derek's. Very cool, and definitely a good example of the kind of work--both technical and interpretive--Derek is capable of. I'd love to know if he has some crazy unusual number of rods and cones, or some other mutant power when it comes to color. Oi!

 

Rhonda, thanks for joining in with your perspective on the "art vs paint-by-number" conversation. I have seen some of the work in the Foundry style (I seem to recall a thread on these very forums some time ago about the "legitimacy" of the style), and I do think it's a pretty interesting way to go about painting large armies. The link you included shows it's a style with a good bit of artistic depth, too.

 

It also brings us into the discussion.of competitions, and what does well...the Foundry style, when done well, requires a lot of technical skill, but not necessarily the skills we (as a hobbyist community) often think of for Gold Sophie/Crystal Brush/Golden Demon winning work. I'm not sure it's in-scope for this thread (though I'm not sure its not, either), but I am always very interested to hear the thoughts of some paint-contest judges when comparing* works like Corporea's to Wappel's to, say, Pingo's. All three artists have a clear style, all three are accomplished artists and excellent technicians. Erin and Wappel paint in a similar enough style (based on end results, their process is less similar, from what I can tell) that comparison can be somewhat straightforward, but Pingo creates some really interesting pieces (that I, for one, respond to very viscerally) that lie outside the realm of most miniatures painting. There's obviously room in the hobby for all three, but sometimes the public markers--big awards, CMON votes, and the like--point toward a specific result as "better" than the other.

 

All in all, I'm very appreciative of this thread for supplying some interesting pieces to look at, and helping to show these other ideas in painting. Kudos to Andy for curating!

 

 

 

 

 

*realizing that comparison isn't always the.goal of judging (i.e., open competitions such as Reaper's)

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, Reaper moving their Con to autumn and thus making it nigh impossible for me to attend shifted a gear in my mind I didn't realize had engaged - I had begun considering pieces intended for competition. Now I'm taking stock and just trying to hit whatever takes my fancy (if I can get it prepped, primed and started before my fancy moves on to the next thing!).

 

Schubert's brushwork is very interesting, the amount he does or does not blend, and how his subtle use of colors plays into that. Everything he paints is a lesson. While there's a ton to learn from that dryad, my own takeaway so far is his woodgrain technique, which I've used on at least a half dozen minis trying to dial it in.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the concept of re-picturing a figure as something different than what the figure was first envisioned. DKS's work is always very inspiring - particularly when looking at this piece. Creating the Druid vibe, not only from the colour scheme, but then free-handing the bark-texture on the blade, the leaf veining on the cape. Also the use of reds and greens - without it looking like Christmas - just brilliant.

I think this a great example of why it is art, at all stages....from art concept, to sculpture, to paint finish.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder how one could set up a contest that doesn't insist upon a certain style, but also isn't just totally up to the judges' subjective feelings. Obviously there are things like composition and so forth that I imagine would be fairly consistent across styles, but is there some way to measure technical skill that both credits the difficulty of achieving smooth blends and recognizes that they aren't necessary in an effective painting?

 

For that matter, when are we going to get our weird abstract/post-modern/dadaist mini painting scene?

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For that matter, when are we going to get our weird abstract/post-modern/dadaist mini painting scene?

At Rcon 2013, there was an entry that was one sculpt (Hellebore the Assassin, I think), painted many times in styles emulating multiple artists. Pretty neat idea.

 

Here it is: https://reapercon.com/mspopen/2013/artist/Ellenmarie%20Rockwell

 

ETA link info

Edited by Sanael
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

Monday Miniature: 77006 Great Worm

 

Sculpted by Michael Brower

 

Today I am going to do something a little different.  We've been having a great discussion on how a mini is like a canvas and that how an artist interprets that canvas and adds the color can elevate it to something more than the original sculpt.  I wanted to show a simple version of this in today's mini, son, instead of showing just one mini, I am going to show the same mini from several artists.  I think the variety is amazing.

 

 

 

Painted by LordNurgle

 

IG_3930_1.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by ub3r_n3rd

 

IG_3683_1.jpg

 

 

Painted by Edsterdoom

 

IG_3705_3.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by warswithtoys

 

IG_3098_1.jpg

 

 

Painted by Thes Hunter

 

IG_3025_2.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Baugi

 

IG_2834_1.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by SamuraiJack

 

IG_2617_2.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Maglok

 

IG_2554_1.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Jim Cook Jr

 

IG_2392_2.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Corporea

 

IG_2351_1.jpgIG_2351_2.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Adrift

 

IG_2058_3.jpg

 

 

 

Painted by Grimvar

 

IG_1872_1.jpg

 

 

 

If I missed your version, I am sorry.  There are so many different versions of this piece out there, and I didn't want this post getting too big; I was really looking for variations more than who painted what.

 

Andy

  • Like 14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a great idea for a running thread. May I suggest that you may want to lock the current thread every couple of months and start a new one? Should keep the threads from getting too unwieldy. I look forward to consuming this thread from the beginning and seeing where it goes. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love what the worm represents, an open canvas that aside from some game lore, there is no 'wrong' way to paint it. Things like that engage the creativity of the painter and stimulate new neural pathways!

 

If only people (self included!) could bring more of that to traditional sculpts. We've made some headway with tangerine goblins :)

 

I've tried some pretty wild things, from re-purposing fantasy minis as superheroes to just making an out there skin palette. When I did Goldar he turned out cool, I still look at that skin tone because a lot of the subtlety didn't show in photos. But I wanted to sell it as more of a human skin tone and hadn't begun developing my (meager, rudimentary) skills in palette control, so my next attempt was Anval, where half the reason for painting him was to push a bizarre skin tone but keep it readable as a flesh tone by bringing in a little 'skin' color (via tanned flesh, if I remember). That warm skin tone seems to have become an obsession! I was just thinking about another attempt at my bizarre attempt at Seza, using stuff I learned about that heavy block in style from the Zach project.

 

Always keep your mind open, try to see things in new ways. Look at good artists, in mini painting and especially elsewhere (I've got a Degenesis-based project in mind now!). Keep developing your skillset and examining your weak spots. I may be overly tough on myself (though I don't see it that way!) and I wish I could play to my strengths better, but by deliberately trying to improve my weak spots I get a great deal of satisfaction. I didn't like the way Seza was so blocky to the point I wasn't sure how to blend it back in, so my next project I went intentionally blocky to the nth degree and loved the results. Though I did blend it a bit, and the main reason for that was Seza sitting on the shelf needing love...

 

Sorry for the rambles, I gotta get back to work soon!

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome post/ figure....the great worm, is not a miniature I would see blank, (unpainted), and say omg I have to buy that now! But when you see what people "do" with it...it makes you want to try your hand, and see what you would produce. There are figures, that I see the greens or concept art, and I just have to have. But others I definately need some others artist's take on it to get me interested. That's what I like about the Inspiration - Figure Pages and Artist gallery.....quite a bit of the time, I see how someone represented a figure and I love what they did, but instead of doing a pure copy, I'll use the imagery to help me go in another direction.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...