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The Monday Miniature: 2015


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I think this week's mini both reminds me I should finish my copy of this and also is a realization of part of my enjoyment of this hobby: seeing how everyone interprets the mini differently. Surely there are "traditional" takes on it, adhering to the game lore Cash mentioned (mine is one), and those look superb, but then there are more "out there" takes that are just as effective. It's fun to see such variety back to back to back on a prolific mini like this and I think too is an important example of how there's not a "wrong" interpretation of a miniature, even if it has been sculpted after a clear, iconic vision. That's a habit I know I'm not always good about breaking myself out of.

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Monday Mini: 03725 Moandain, Arch Lich

 

IG_4953_1.jpg IG_4953_3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Painted by Adrift
Sculpted by Kevin Williams
 
 
The Paint: Adrift's work is always a delight to see, but he really did something special with this piece. He entitles this "Phylactery reboot engaged" and I can really see it in the piece.  First you have the electric blue lightning, with OSL light effects painted on the body. (I hope Adrift sees this and will give us all a run down on his OSL here.)  Then, he added a smooth transition of color change down the robes from purple near the center of power to red at the extremities.  It really looks like the lich is reforming into solidity from the source of power. I just love everything about this mini.
 
The Sculpt: As much as I love Aaron's paint job, I am even more bowled over by Kevin's sculpting (and Izzy's design????).  When I first met Kevin 3 years ago, the first thing he said to me was, "Oh you're Andy Pieper; I hate you."  He was referring to my sculpt, Coraline Thaddington and the fact that she was too good to be my first human.  Well, with this sculpt, Kevin, right back at you.  Most sculptor's struggle to find poses and such that really stir emotion, life, action, interest, and passion.  This one does it all in spades.
 
Just look at the way the robes form a full s, first with themselves, and then also with the body and spell effect.  The counter swaying sleeves are just genius. Add to it a base that rocks in it's own accord, and it just floors me.
 
One other thing that is really hard to do is to make flying/hovering characters believable.  Again this sculpt knocks it out of the park.  One hardly even notices that the figure is even attached to a base.  
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One thing I always have a hard time managing is weight and balance in sculpture- this is one where I have to wonder how the heck he got the thing to stand up! It's so delicate, but perfectly designed to balance itself without too much extra stuff on the base.  Yep.  He's brilliant.

 

Sigh.

 

Is it easier to balance in greenstuff than metal?  Meaning do you have to take into account the weight of something when sculpting more so that with the lighter material to the point you'd change the design?  I can see doing light, airy forms in putty no problem- thin wire, minimal material- it wouldn't take much of a base to counterbalance that.  But it doesn't work in metal.not just because of the casting process, but because of the sheer weight of the stuff?

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Also, the fragility of lighter materials like resin. How far do you push aesthetics vs having a model that will just break over and over?

 

I'm a huge fan of flowing, dynamic minis like this and Kevin knocked it completely out of the park on this one.

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Is it easier to balance in greenstuff than metal?  Meaning do you have to take into account the weight of something when sculpting more so that with the lighter material to the point you'd change the design?  I can see doing light, airy forms in putty no problem- thin wire, minimal material- it wouldn't take much of a base to counterbalance that.  But it doesn't work in metal.not just because of the casting process, but because of the sheer weight of the stuff?

 

Not really, the balance point should be the same for either material, mass and gravity being constant and all. Metal minis are more likely to be damaged when they do tip and a weighted base will be more effective on a non-metal mini. However, it is very hard to judge the tipping point when sculpting because the green is typically pinned down to the cork/working base.  When I did the wyvern, I had to do an adjustment to the base after ward to make it stand on it's own, because I'd misjudged the center point on it.

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Although I absolutely give mad props for the composition and craftsmanship of the sculpt, it's never quite done it for me. Objectively, I agree it is a phenomenal piece, and appreciate the artistic risk involved in sculpting it.

 

The paint on this one does hit me in the feels. It matches the sculpt in terms of sheer audacity, and succeeds wildly.

 

And that's really what I take from this piece as a whole. Take risks, or die mired. Let your reach exceed your grasp...the attempt is often more important than the result, and it isn't without a history of that kind of artistic risk that Adrift could achieve this work.

 

It's why I can't stop watching these forums even when I haven't had much chance to paint in nearly a year. Adrift, Cash, Corporea...Andy, Jabberwocky...several who most of this board haven't known: Jester, Flynn...and all the painters and sculptors that post here, no matter the skill.

 

I hope everyone here realizes the risk inherent in simply posting to Showoff: welcome to the path to making art like this piece.

 

...and I'm being maudlin and rambly, so I'll stop there.

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That paint job makes me shiver all over. The OSL is pretty dang amazing, and those smooth blends along the robes are something I aspire to (on the minis I that want to be more "realistic" than my normal "cartoony" style minis).

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I'll echo that this is a masterful sculpt that Kevin was able to produce. I can hardly detect the limitations of the mold making process. It still has that 2D flatness of a metal mini produced in a rubber mold though. My gut felling about this mini is that the elements should corkscrew swirl around instead of the s curve. But that is just me.

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The Monday Miniature: 77143 Townsfolk: Undertaker

 

IG_3118_1.jpgIG_3118_2.jpg

 

Painted by Cash Wiley
Sculpted by Bobby Jackson

 

First, I apologize for missing last Monday.  My boss retired and everything went pretty crazy in the wake of it last week.

 

Today we have an excellent monochrome rendition of the undertaker.  I love the stark black and white highlighting with the only color beint the orange from the glow of the lantern. This is OSL done very very well.

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