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The Monday Miniature: 2015


TaleSpinner
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Ah, I remember this guy. Direct inspiration for my own knockoff version, which the forum seems to have eaten. (ETA: Found it!) Mine, of course, was nowhere near as nice as Cash's, but was still one of the best minis I'd painted at the time. That mini has a really great face for contrast; I remember those sharply defined features being really fun to paint.

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I love the use of monochrome on this particular mini. Really gives the sense of darkness and gloom that probably were "just part of the job." The OSL as already stated was done very very well, and this one is actually already saved in my reference file of awesome paint jobs.

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*blush*

 

Actually, it's not black and white, it's blue and blue :) Not a spot of black or white on him, I was in the middle of exploring a few color ideas, and this became my cold dark steel nmm recipe on Luther not long after and then my Twilight Knight (you can find links and WIP links in my project index in my signature, I should list paints and techniques in there for those interested).

 

This, like most of my stuff, is a great example of the rule of cool. My painting is pretty crude, but I try to make it look cooler than it is with subject matter and color palette, etc. I do study a ton, but with my limited painting time it's hard to put it into practice, thus things stay a bit rougher than I'd like.

 

Anyway, as I was saying, the blue was intentional. I was reading a lot of Gurney at the time, Color and Light needs to be on your bookshelf (you do have an art bookshelf, RIGHT!?) if you want to be a better painter. I got all nutty with how the eye processes color in moonlight. Unfortunately I used the (awesome) 'Corporea Black' (Walnut Brn + Sapphire Blue) as a base for him...and he's Bones so he was already chipping by the time I finished. From there it became a study in monochrome, learning how to do such a thing. You won't learn without trying!

 

Then a study in OSL, I think it was my first OSL piece. Again, lots of reading and looking at pics. I wanted it subdued, a candle in a lantern, not casting a ton of light. Spent a lot of time working out the colors on paper and studying how light would actually travel from the lamp. I got some criticism that I should've lit more, and probably could've given a tiny dot on the shovel. But really it's pretty close to what I wanted, a dim warm light that stays as true as I could manage to the shape of the lantern.

 

Also, it's a study in color contrast. The orange light looks so good because of all the blue it's surrounded by.

 

Finally, I picked a base that was thematic but also made a good backdrop for enhancing the OSL effect.

 

Glad folks like it! He was fun to paint and a great learning experience. I suggest trying it out, it's a great mini seemingly made to learn OSL on! Just do your homework first :)

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Of the topics people tend to consider more 'advanced', I think OSL is the easiest technique wise.There are theory and principles that you can learn (or work on figuring out) to know a lot of what to do and how to do it. I've seen pieces that primarily used drybrushing that got a lot of the principles right and worked really well, and pieces with wonderful blending and technique by painting luminaries that didn't follow enough of the theory behind OSL so didn't look as good as they could have by far. (That definitely includes my first go at it, which was much less effective than this wonderfully atmospheric piece.)

 

Cash's piece demonstrates a number of the elements you can use to create this illusion well. (And I don't think his painting technique is nearly so poor as he does. :->) Colour choices are definitely an element of that - using cooler and less saturated colours in the shadow areas, and warm and saturated colours for the light. A larger than standard broccoli base with added scenic elements so there is more room for light reflection and shadow play is also very helpful in helping the viewer read the effect more quickly particularly with scenes that have more ambient light.

 

Elements he didn't mention but the piece also demonstrates - the light source is the lightest tone (closer to white if you look at it in B&W) part of the miniature, and the reflected light is also brighter than surrounding areas. This happens less often than you would think, particularly when people do red OSL. (Red is much darker in tone than most of us think. Light sources that cast red light aren't themselves red generally, and light sources that are red are much darker than other colour light sources.)

One element that could have been pushed a little further would have been to paint in more dramatic cast shadows behind the figure and gravestone. Which Cash may have considered and decided not to do, I'm just mentioning as it is something that can help sell the OSL effect and may prove useful to other people who decide to give this a go. And like Cash, I recommend doing that! 

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The Monday Miniature: 30011 Finari, Female Crusader-Through the Looking Glass

 
IG_4983_2.jpgIG_4983_1.jpg
 
 
Painted by Erin (Corporea)
Sculpted by Werner Klocke

 

It seems I am developing a bit of a fan-attitude towards Erin's work; I'll try to stop before I hit the creepy stalking phase.  To expand further on last week's monochrome mini, this mini shows an amazing depth of the usage of light.  I love monochrome models like this because you get to see how the artist depicts light on the subject without all the colors getting in the way.  I just love the emotion in this piece. There is a story behind this, just waiting to come out.  I imagine that she is trapped in the world without color and can't return, only getting a glimpse through the mirrored pool.

 

Oh, and look at the NMM on that sword, fantastic work.

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Hadn't seen this one before and it's very striking.

 

If Corporea (or anyone else that knows) could explain how the tree and what appear to be very delicate leaves were created (or are they part of another model) could you fill us in?

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Hadn't seen this one before and it's very striking.

 

If Corporea (or anyone else that knows) could explain how the tree and what appear to be very delicate leaves were created (or are they part of another model) could you fill us in?

I believe she stated in her WIP that they were Brass Etch leaves that she got from the Hasslefree Miniatures webstore.

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You aren't stalking the painter, just the painted!

 

Loved this piece when I saw it earlier this year, surprised it was only posted in the Inspiration Gallery the other day!

 

Not sure JCG, but willing to bet the leaves are photo-etched brass...

 

G

 

:ph34r:  there is a new response to this. show?

 

Ub3r, stop with the Barbarians and put up your true avatar! :ph34r:

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Loved this piece when I saw it earlier this year, surprised it was only posted in the Inspiration Gallery the other day!

 

I'm not surprised at all. They don't seem to add vignettes or dioramas to the Store as they are too specialized. They add nicely painted single figures.

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The reason we all dabble in monochrome is that it forces you to focus on 1/3 of the tools available (removing hue and saturation).

 

One of the challenges of painting is to convey the feeling of different materials with paint. By only using values, you have to really pay close attention to reflectivity and any texture a surface may have. Lots of folks focus on the difficulty of blending nmm, but really it's about understanding how metal reflects light.

 

Another is the reduction in tools for contrast, since you can't use color contrast. I spend so much time trying to figure out what colors to use, in a way it's nice to limit that but it also means you have to be clever with how you assign values to different areas so you preserve definition without losing the overall value structure of a piece.

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nah- I just forget to add my stuff to the gallery, so I literally added it last night! :lol:

This is one of my favorite pieces as well, because I pushed myself to paint harder than I ever had to pull off the effect.  I'll say that is one reason I like picking a concept or a hard technique, because it helps me grow as a painter.  It's nice to relax and just paint for fun sometimes, but the only way I improve is to make myself do something I'm bad at.  In this case, NMM is something I'm still learning and struggling with.  Especially gold NMM.  I can see the silver a bit better in my head and it is easier to paint for some reason.  So I know I'll work on a few pieces with gold NMM to make myself 'get it'

 

The tree is sculpted with wire and greenstuff/milliput.  I tend to use the milliput underneath or at least for the base of the tree because it's a little stiffer.  I get more detail with the greenstuff.  The leaves are etched brass.  Since I can't post commerce, go to the scalelink website and search foliage or leaves and you can find sheets of the etched brass in different scales.  Hasselfree sells it as well, and I've bought from both sites without trouble- and hasselfree gives me candy!  It helps to pick the scale size using the hasselfree site, but if I want a full sheet I buy it from scalelink because it's a bit cheaper.  You get basically a quarter sheet from hasselfree and a full sheet from scalelink.  So, if you want to try out the foliage, buy a 'sample' from hasselfree.  these leaves are chestnut.  I've used the willow, ferns and tropical plants as well.  I have a whole bunch of them since I didn't want to pay multiple shipping, so if you want pics of any particular type with a scale figure, let me know.

 

I'll also use birch seeds for leaves.

 

The reflection was a pain, let me tell you!  I go over it in my WIP, but the take-home is that the figures we paint are altered from typical human proportions with a larger head to body ratio.  Rather than a 1/6 they're a 1/5-4 or so.  So when I took a photo of the mini in a mirror and copied it, the head was too big to look right.  So I had to re-draw it.  keep that in mind if you're going to try something similar!

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