Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Limey72

A quick priming question

Recommended Posts

The last 2 cans of spray on primer I have used have given me lumpy results then refused to spray at all. Will I get the required "tooth" priming with spray on sealer. Thanks in advance for any help.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What brand of primer are you using?  What are the environmental conditions (humidity and temperature) like?  Did you shake the can for 2-5 minutes?

 

Ron

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Las Vegas so high heat low humidity krylons matte sealer always used it but only the last 2 cans were a problem and yes to shaking. Thanks for replying

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Krylon primer, I find that i have to be very careful or I'll get too much primer on the mini.  It could be that you ended up with a bad batch or a batch that was stored at conditions which caused the contents to start to solidify?

 

If I'm using rattle cans, I use Duplicolor Sandable Primer: good spray pattern, pretty tolerant of a range of environmental conditions, doesn't go on too quickly, doesn't cover up detail, and runs about $5 locally at auto parts stores.

 

I suggest trying Duplicolor before going to a varnish.  

 

Ron

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like old (previously used) or weather-pendulated cans as far as lumps go.  As long as your spray-on sealer is matte/flat, or satin it should give a good tooth for paint adherence.  Seconding what vutpakdi said, Krylon primer can absolutely soak a single mini, obfuscating detail and running, if you're not careful--I imagine the sealer would pose a similar risk.  Might be searching out Duplicolor to try too.

Edited by BLZeebub
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh. ANY spray primer has the potential for obscuring detail under the wrong conditions. I've been using Krylon for years and have had better control, and better results overall with it, than any other single brand, with the single exception of Testor's gray, which is too expensive for how small the can is.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meh. ANY spray primer has the potential for obscuring detail under the wrong conditions. I've been using Krylon for years and have had better control, and better results overall with it, than any other single brand, with the single exception of Testor's gray, which is too expensive for how small the can is.

Good point.  I do still use Krylon normally (it's what I can get most affordably in general), but I keep it moving.  And if I miss a tiny spot, I use a brush-on primer instead of another blast of spray.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find that Krylon comes out much faster and harder than Duplicolor. Once you get used to the Krylon, it's fine, but I find the Duplicolor to be more forgiving and preserves the detail better.

 

Ron

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Krylon. I spray at about 12" distance and I don't spray directly on the mini. I start spraying before it while moving past it.

 

I've never once had a problem with Krylon and I spray outside in Florida. Hot and humid.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Krylon primer, I find that i have to be very careful or I'll get too much primer on the mini.  It could be that you ended up with a bad batch or a batch that was stored at conditions which caused the contents to start to solidify?

 

If I'm using rattle cans, I use Duplicolor Sandable Primer: good spray pattern, pretty tolerant of a range of environmental conditions, doesn't go on too quickly, doesn't cover up detail, and runs about $5 locally at auto parts stores.

 

I suggest trying Duplicolor before going to a varnish.  

 

Ron

 

 

Duplicolor Sandable White Primer is IMO THE BEST primer in a can that I have ever used (I like it much better than the more expensive Tamiya and Floquil primers).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making sure the can is at room temperature is key IMO, as well as making sure you do several light coats.  Build it up in layers.  I have used Krylon with no issues.  I mostly spray Tamiya when i feel like spending a stupid crazy amount of $$ on a tiny can, or airbrushable paint like Badger's Stynylrez or MIG Ammo's primer.

Edited by EngineerJeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use P3 White and Black sprays, at about $10 per (12oz / 340g) can, it's more expensive than krylon et al, but I feel the results are worth it. Have not tried the Tamiya or other 'model' brands except for GW. 

Don't Go There!

 

Oh and Testor's way back in the day....

 

George

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use P3 White and Black sprays, at about $10 per (12oz / 340g) can, it's more expensive than krylon et al, but I feel the results are worth it. Have not tried the Tamiya or other 'model' brands except for GW. 

Don't Go There!

 

Oh and Testor's way back in the day....

 

George

 

 

Look at the nozzle of your P3 primer, then go to your nearest full service auto parts store and look at the Patented Nozzle on the cans of Duplicolor.

 

P3 is Duplicolor primer at a 2.5X markup.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...