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So I have the day off today, which means I was able to stay up nice and late last night painting.  I got one of the little Partha goblins I've been working on around midnight, and then went to bed.  Couldn't get my sorry buttocks up until about nine thirty this morning, went and made coffee, had some toast and then wanted to put finish on my little goblin so later today I could work on his base and finally call him done.

 

So I used the Reaper brush on finish, mixing it with water, and as I was applying the finish, I noticed that I was literally wiping way the paint on the edges of the straps and on the arrow case (he's an archer).  I thought this was kind of odd because I'd waited really about ten hours before I put the finish on.  I normally wait a full day but wanted to take advantage with being on vacation today.  I've put finish on miniatures before in less time than this and nothing has ever remotely happened like this.  Has this ever happened to anybody else, or would this have been a freakishly exceptional case?

 

So ending out the story, I touched up on the little guy which took about an hour, which cut highly into my joyful morning paint time, as I hate doing things over, but oh well....

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I've never heard of anything quite like that, but the recommendation I usually see is to wait a full 24 hours between the last coat of paint and the first coat of sealer. It does sound like the paint wasn't sticking very well though, which may be a different issue entirely. I assume you used primer?

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Yup, used primer, never use any additives but water.  Typically I wait the prescribed 24 hours but I just wanted to get this one done.  I wonder if my water to finish  ratio was too heavy on the water and with that water based paint just stripped some of it.  And then of course I come to find out this morning that I can't find any of the green putty that I'm reasonably sure I still had.  Luckily I've got the day off.  Unluckily I've got to go to the dentist, at four, but on my way back I'll get the putty from the hobby store.

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I think I'm going to have to attribute this to not letting the paint cure fully. Water shouldn't be able to strip paint once it's cured (otherwise we wouldn't need stuff like Simple Green) so I really can't think of what else would cause this. I'd say wait a full day in the future, and if you can still reproduce this effect then, we'll need to go into full-on troubleshooting mode.

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So this happened again, as I was putting sealer on my Stonehaven elves, the elf druid had one of his eyebrows wipe off.  This is really starting to bother me.  I painted it back on, and it's the only thing I can immediately see was affected/changed/modified, but still.  I'm almost wanting to not put sealer on my miniatures any more.

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Someone else started a different thread with a similar problem the other day.  In that case it was partially attributed to some of the Vallejo paints and/or too much flow aid, I think.  What paints are you using?  How old are they and how well did you shake them? 

 

I do remember having a similar problem when I was using half Vallejo and half Reaper paints, but the problem went away when I switched to all Reaper.  My Vallejo paints at the time were getting old and thickening up, plus they were requiring a lot of shaking.  It's a super-frustrating problem to have, and unless there's a bad paint bottle you're using my best suggestion would be to try a spray on sealer. 

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I'm pretty much using all Reaper paints and have even switched over to Reaper brush on sealer. I don't really want to go to a spray sealer, as I don't want the risk of it being shiny. I'm a matte kind of guy.

 

My paints ages differ of course, but I always shake them well before using them.

 

 

And it's now two different colors, at least. On my goblin archer there were a few places it was being affected, and with this one it was walnut brown, which was essentially a line that was his eyebrow over his right eye.

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How long did you wait this time between painting and sealing? How warm/dry is your painting area? I mean, it could just be that the paint needs more drying time. The reason I suggested spray sealer (and it could just be a very light coat) is that it would protect the paint layers from being picked up by the brush.

 

Hopefully someone more knowledgeable than me can help you resolve this problem, it is extremely frustrating.

 

EDIT: Walnut brown was the color observed to have horrible rub-off issues on Bones, maybe it requires more cure time??

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This particular figure I finished January 10th, and today is January 16th, so five to six days drying time.  I live in the Midwest U.S. (Omaha), where it's dry and wintery, not lots of humidity.

 

You are right with that though. If I gave it a light spraying before I applied a brush sealer, maybe that would keep the paint there. It's weird though because this is pretty new for me, I've been painting for years, and this is the first time something like this has happened (or now the second).

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I live in the Midwest U.S. (Omaha), where it's dry and wintery, not lots of humidity.

If it is too cold where your are painting or letting them dry it could be increasing the necessary dry time.

How cold is it there right now?

Is your painting/drying area heated?

What is the average temperature in your painting/drying area?

 

It is also possible you could have had something like brush soap or some other contaminate in the paint layer that is giving you this problem which is causing it to not dry properly.

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