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Strange Problem With Painting My First Pewters


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When washing minis I use Dawn dish soap as it specifically targets oils. Since I wash my dishes with it, I always have it in the house (and Dawn with Bleach is excellent if you get tangled up with poison ivy as it's normally the oils in the plant that causes the rash). It also rinses clean, so I don't worry about residue. Bath soap will leave a residue.

 

If you notice paint peeling off as you're painting this could be several factors. If you use a drying retarder (Liquitex Slow Dri for instance), your layers may not be dry enough yet. This is one of my problems. I want to keep moving on the mini, but forget the paint needs to dry. Since you're in Seattle, which is very humid (I lived in Edmonds a short time; loved it there), you may want to hit the mini with a low heat blast from a hair dryer to speed the drying time.

 

I use a handle on all my minis while painting them before they've been sealed. I found if I didn't, I could rub all layers down to the metal (even the primer) during the course of handling. Also, you're adding more oils to the mini as you handle it, which can affect how the paint will stick.

 

Good luck! Let us know how it goes!

 

+1 for Dawn... for minis and dishes!

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haven't seen it mentioned, so excuse me if I just missed it, but I find it's easiest to simply wear a glove on my non-painting hand, to hold the mini with. I mean like a cheap latex or what have you throw away kind (assuming you are not allergic etc) I will also tend to use a matte varnish like the liquitex one between layers if I'm going to leave it for a while, to help seal it. May not be necessary, just how I like to do it. It probably just depends how much you handle it too - you still need to be careful obviously of the drying paint.

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I wear thin nitrile exam gloves for most of my work, painting or gluing. Heck, I use them in the kitchen in the dry winter. They save so many headaches.

 

(I learned to paint in thick dishwashing gloves after being deeply affected as a new student by the skin condition of an older student who had developed sensitivity to art materials. After those gloves nitrile was *easy*.)

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I wear thin nitrile exam gloves for most of my work, painting or gluing. 

I use them during assembly. I find it's easier to wash minis while they're still in pieces. For painting, I only handle minis by the rim of the base, so it doesn't matter much.

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If nitrile are the blue gloves, putty sticks to them, at least when mixing. I reuse them a few times and then throw them out if they're too caked up with dried putty to work. There isn't a lot I can imagine putty wouldn't stick to. Possibly this substance, but it's only available as a mat and not as gloves so far as I can tell.

 

http://www.slipgripmat.com/

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Oils might be the problem, but it might also be the primer.  Does the primer say it is made for metal.  Try switching to a different primer like Krylon, and spray it during warm dry conditions.  Personally I like to polish my minis with a brass wire brush attached to a dremel before priming, to take off any of the grittiness that some pewter models get, as well as remove mold release and whatever other chemicals are on the surface.

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Don't forget to shake your primer like a madman for 2+ minutes for best results as well (this also applies to brush-on primers).  Some people also put the spray can in a sink basin full of warm water for a couple minutes before shaking.  This goes for anything in a rattle can, though of course you should give brush-on paints and primers a good shake before using as well.

 

I prefer using a piece of bubble wrap over using a glove to hold a mini that is awkwardly shaped for attaching a painting handle to.  The bubbles insulate the mini from much of the paint-rubbing friction of being grabbed and block the finger oils from getting on your mini, while allowing you to manipulate the mini as needed while holding it steady.  This is particularly useful for larger or awkwardly balanced pieces.  Gluing those to large enough handles for the piece to balance on between sittings can end up blocking wide areas that need painting.

 

Good luck!

 

Kang

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