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illanthraen

NMM..help a newb to do it

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so I have been painting minis for a few years..obviously under a rock because after joining this forum was the first time I ever heard of NMM. It looks fantastic..much cooler than using metallic paints. I can see from pictures that it seems to be a simple basecoat, highlight, highlight more method..but can you master painter people help me out on what it really takes?

 

I only have so many minis that I can practise on...so I need to find out the best ways.

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Okidoki. The secret is, get really smooth gradients(or blends, as they are also called).

They need to run from darkest to brightest over relatively small distances, to avoid the stone armor look. I like to work with at least 4 colors that serve as the block colors for each luminance level within an area. One of these color series would be, FREX, Black, Dark Blue, Grey Blue, Ice Blue, and White. This color progression should work well for a blueish steel look on a sword or piece of armor.

 

Each distinct surface that comprises a metallic surface on the miniature (like the side of a greave or armguard) needs to be painted as a separate entity, regarding the placement of the shadows and reflection that affect it.

 

The actual placement of said shadows and reflections depends on the source of light you have selected for your mini, and, for it one needs to study other peoples examples and /or pictures of similarly shaped/lighted items.

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Each distinct surface that comprises a metallic surface on the miniature (like the side of a greave or armguard) needs to be painted as a separate entity, regarding the placement of the shadows and reflection that affect it.

Errex, that may be the most succinctly intelligent description of the NMM technique I have ever seen. :wow:

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Each distinct surface that comprises a metallic surface on the miniature (like the side of a greave or armguard)  needs to be painted as a separate entity, regarding the placement of the shadows and reflection that affect it.

Errex, that may be the most succinctly intelligent description of the NMM technique I have ever seen. :wow:

Yeah, I'm definitely going to try and remember that.

 

People might even think I'm clever if I say something like that ^_^

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It's very similar to an explanation given on the Elfwood project. For those of you who haven't used this site for your NMM studies, I would highly recommend it.

 

http://elfwood.lysator.liu.se/farp/art.html?1154

 

The area on "composition, color, action, and perspectives" will do wonders for a good paint job. It took me from remedial to mediocre in no time... ::):

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Are there any particularly good tutorials or examples of this? I've done some searching and most of the time it is "Here are the colors I used and this is what it looks like when done." This is fine for a good overview but I was looking for a step-by-step if there is a good one. THanks!

 

Harliquinn

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The painter sites I've pulled from have all been very helpful, but mostly in the arena of color selections for a particular effect.

The elfwood tutorials actually made it possible for me to create custom NMM colors with at least some degree of success. I've only used someone else's color mixes once on my NMM attempts, and then my adventurous soul led me in the direction of experimenting with color selection.

 

The painter links I've found most useful are listed in this thread...

 

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?...-metallic+metal

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Just a random thought: I think that the effectiveness of NMM relies heavily of how familiar the viewer is to hard, polished surfaces.

 

I mean, you see a curved surface, painted with a very dramatic color gradient, from very dark to very bright, and depending on the object in question, the viewers brain interprets it as a shoulderpad on an armored mini, or as a cap on somebody's head. Might be an interesting excercise, using the very same technique on such dissimilar subjects, just for fun. Heck, it doesn't even have to be similarly shaped surfaces.

 

My theory is that both such objects, painted using the same colors on different miniatures, would be interpreted differently each time. I will have to prove it sometime, though...

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My theory is that both such objects, painted using the same colors on different miniatures, would be interpreted differently each time. I will have to prove it sometime, though...

Absolutely...the perspective would be different. Both from a viewer and view surface perspective. I'm doing some experimenting with this currently...of course I'm butchering a bunch of minis in the process, but it's been a great learning experience for me. Just another bump in the road to greatness.... ::):

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