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Reaper Paint Safe Around Babies?


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I'm giving some miniatures to a friend who has a 1 yr old child.  While there are no particular plans to have the baby eat any of the minis, you know how they can be at that age.  :)  I'd like to be able to re-assure them as to the safety of the materials used.  Is there anyone who can tell me for sure whether Bones minis, Reaper paint, and Reaper Brush-on Sealer are non-toxic?

 

Thanks!

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there are several threads on why one should not lick a brush with miniatures paint and the associated paint ingredients.  I wouldn't recommend letting a toddler get ahold of a miniature for the choking hazard alone, what is in the paint is also an issue though.  minis and paint should be kept well out of reach.

 

non-toxic and safe for consumption are not the same thing.

 

I'm not a reaper employee and the above is just my opinion.

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Unless they're chugging multiple bottles of paint, I don't see those as being any issue.  Once dry/cured, the paint should be relatively inert biologically anyway in normal quantities (think how little paint is actually on even a large mini).  However, letting toddlers get their hands and mouths on the minis themselves is begging for a Darwin Award.

Edited by BLZeebub
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Unless you routinely keep your paints at a child's level, you won't have a problem.  I've painted through two infants, and there's never been an issue.

 

I'm far more worried about the super glue I have.

 

My oldest liked sitting on my lap when I gamed, and he really wanted to put dice in his mouth.  Never paint.

 

Edited to add:

 

And you really need to define what you mean by "non toxic."  If you try to melt Bones, the fumes will be toxic.  Plus melting plastic is hot, and will cause burns.  If you drink nothing but paint and sealer, you'll not survive long.  But under normal use, there's no reason to suspect that Reaper paints are any more dangerous than the paint you're residence is covered in, and the plastic minis aren't any more risky than the plastic toys imported from China that are ubiquitous in retail stores today.

 

In short, paranoia about hobby supplies should be way low on the list of worries.  I'd be much more concerned about the residual plastic found in pretty much any processed food we eat (including baby foods).

Edited by Doug's Workshop
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non-toxic and safe for consumption are not the same thing.

Quoted for emphasis.

 

I am a professional artist, a parent, and somewhat knowledgeable about the safety hazards of artists' materials.

 

Reaper materials are no more hazardous than standard art materials given to children.  So far as I can tell, they take care to use nothing known to be hazardous.

 

But.

 

No one is really overseeing the safety of such things.  The chemical industry is uninterested in rigorous testing of materials and few governments make it a real priority (I am remembering a news story of a chemical spill into a river some years back where the US government did not know what sort of warning to give residents downstream because nobody had ever tested the spilled substance for its effects on humans).

 

My rule of thumb is to assume that every art supply should be treated with respect.

 

I wouldn't let any sort of paint near a one-year-old anyhow. 

 

ETA:  One consideration my husband just reminded me of: How fast can you clean up / wash things off / get rid of the stabby bits if the one-year-old suddenly needs something?

Edited by Pingo
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Nearly all typical hobby miniatures are choking hazards* with sharp bits that can cause significant damage if swallowed even if choking does not result. If the miniature is handled in such a way that these hazards are obviated, cured paint (which is a thin layer of plastic with a bit of pigment) should not be a problem.

 

IMPORTANT NOTES: I do not represent Reaper or any other miniatures company, so this is not any sort of official statement by anyone. I have not tested miniatures paints for this purpose, nor have I seen the results of any such tests. This is my OPINION ONLY; you are responsible for any action you take.

 

* There's a specific definition that CPSC uses, involving a tube of a specific size, but a toilet paper tube is a pretty good field expedient. Nearly all minis can be shoved through that tube easily, which is why miniatures companies include a disclaimer that miniatures are not toys.

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As BLZeebub said letting a toddler get their hands on a mini is asking for a Darwin Award. I will take that a step forward letting a toddler get his/her hands on a bottle of paint, open or closed, and any other hobby tools is also asking for problems whether it's non-toxic or not, because everything and anything they can get their hands on goes into their mouth. This doesn't mean you have to give up painting per se it just means you have to clean up and lock your stuff away when you are done or get distracted.

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I'm giving some miniatures to a friend who has a 1 yr old child. While there are no particular plans to have the baby eat any of the minis, you know how they can be at that age. :) I'd like to be able to re-assure them as to the safety of the materials used. Is there anyone who can tell me for sure whether Bones minis, Reaper paint, and Reaper Brush-on Sealer are non-toxic?

 

Thanks!

Dry paint? Should not be a problem.

 

However as others have said, these are a choking hazard and should be kept out of their reach. If they are metal, most definitely. You can have minis around small kids (I have two who have been around minis all their life) but just keep them out of reach.

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I am a miniature enthusiast and soon to be mother. I have no issue having miniatures in the house. I also would have identical issues with having my child mouth a preprinted plastic figure, a bones I painted, a pewter I painted, a plastic I painted, or a resin I painted. They are choking hazards and the paint was never meant to be ingested.

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I am a miniature enthusiast and soon to be mother. I have no issue having miniatures in the house. I also would have identical issues with having my child mouth a preprinted plastic figure, a bones I painted, a pewter I painted, a plastic I painted, or a resin I painted. They are choking hazards and the paint was never meant to be ingested.

Congratulations!

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One of our neighbors had an incident with their grand-baby in 2014.  The toddler got a hold of an earring and put it in her mouth.. then inhaled it. Got lodged in the lung, and when the hospital tried to extract it, it tore an artery and the 14 month old baby bled out in the ER. Devastated their family, as it was an entirely preventable accident.

 

We have a toddler about that age and 5 other older children, and I'm beyond paranoid about 'little things' that can end up in the mouth, now. Not a day goes by I don't remind the older kids about choking hazards with the baby.

 

Be careful with little things around babies.

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I believe the post above illustrates exactly my opinion, LOTS of things are dangerous for babies.  I had a child (just one out of 5) try to inhale a small piece of Lego at age 3.  I didn't stop the older children from having Lego, but I sure as heck kept a close eye on whether there were small things lying around and what were the small children up to. 

 

Lots of things are toxic to put in your mouth, including several teething toys over the years.  There is no substitute for adult supervision and other than that reasonable precautions are generally fine. 

 

Unless the child is like this *one* kid I know who has been known to do things like crawl into baking ovens.  That kid gets EXTRA supervision.  :rolleyes: ::P: â€‹

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Unless the child is like this *one* kid I know who has been known to do things like crawl into baking ovens. That kid gets EXTRA supervision. :rolleyes:::P: ​

My cousin's kid is like that, no fear. At 3-5 he got a hold of the car keys and proceeded to start and crash the car. A couple of years later he almost drowned in the river, because he wanted to see what would happen.... his sister saved him, but he was in a coma for a while. Then a few years after that he burned down the house while playing with matches with a friend. His sister had to save them. This actually got to him, I have not heard of any more misfortunes in several years.

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My post is pseudo on topic to the OP's original post, but kind of isn't. From reading it, I gathered that they were asking more about the safety of dried paint already on a miniature. And while I have nothing to contribute to what has already been said regarding that, this might be of some note to anyone who wants to get into painting, but is worried about their small children getting into their paint.

 

While doing my typical drift through Youtube, I came across a video doing a brief review of a newer paint line called Warcolours. I honestly know nothing about them other than what was said in the video (which I will link), but the part of the brand that made me post here is that the dropper bottles come with a child-proof cap. So for anyone who has children, or has friends with children, if you worry they might open your paint and ingest it, this might be of interest to you.

 

Jay Adan's initial thoughts on Warcolours

 

-MvM

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