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TheAuldGrump

Best Place To Buy MDF Bases?

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Been a few years since this has come up - but I finally ran out of the quart of MDF bases that I got from GF9, back in the day.

 

GF9 no longer sells econobases, so who is the current best carrier of such?

 

The Auld Grump

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Probably LITKO.

I tried Litko - they were quite possible the worst bases that I have ever used. ::(:

 

Gluing the flock on them caused the danged things to warp unto an upside down U, popping the figure right off - I will never, ever make the mistake of buying from them again.

 

They were not MDF - they were plywood, and untreated plywood at that.

 

Litko is decent with plastic, but those bases were just plain unuseable.

 

The Auld Grump

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Six Squared Studios sells bases. Not sure if hardboard = MDF, though.

 

 

Hardboard "should" be MDF.  I've never encountered anyone who used that name and meant something else.

 

Hardboard does = MDF.

We changed the wording from MDF to hardboard because some versions of MDF are weak and not well-liked, especially in the US.

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I go to Warsenal, they are awesome and I've never had any issues with them. Mounted all my Mechs on them and they work great.

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Six Squared Studios sells bases. Not sure if hardboard = MDF, though.

 

 

Hardboard "should" be MDF.  I've never encountered anyone who used that name and meant something else.

 

Hardboard does = MDF.

We changed the wording from MDF to hardboard because some versions of MDF are weak and not well-liked, especially in the US.

 

 

 

 

I'm not fond of MDF myself and prefer Litko's plywood bases but it does make a huge difference on how big your bases are. If you are using plywood for a base, especially with larger sizes it must be finished on both sides to avoid warping.

 

And yes MDF is a hardboard, but hardboard is not necessarily MDF. If I walk into a lumber yard or home depot and ask for Hardboard I would expect to be shown Hardboard, not MDF.

 

Hardboard is a composite material created by compressing small particles with glue in a hydraulic press. A typical piece of 3/4-inch hardboard will begin the process as a 4-inch-thick pile of small wood particles or sawdust. When the sawdust is compressed with heat under intense pressure it forms hardboard. The density of the finished product depends on the size of particles.

 

 

Tempered Hardboard

Tempered hardboard is the hardest of all the hardboard products. It's made by cooking small wood particles in steam until they break down. It's then pressed into sheets with hydraulic presses while being heated. The heat and pressure bind the fibers of the wood together again, forming the traditional hardboard surface that is hard, flat and very slick. Tempered hardboard will bend slightly, making it even stronger. It is the perfect choice for cabinet drawer bottoms, templates or anywhere a durable, hard surface is required.

MDF

Medium-density fiberboard, or MDF, is the standard hardboard material. It is harder than chipboard, but not as hard as tempered hardboard. MDF is widely used in 3/4-inch thicknesses for cabinets and shelving. It is strong, slick and finishes to a glassy slick finish that's perfect for cabinet interiors. MDF is a light brown color with no other distinguishing characteristics. It is perfectly dimensioned, will not warp and is almost completely free of any deviations or defects.

 
High-Density Fiberboard

High-density fiberboard is the premium version of hardboard used by builders, cabinetmakers and furniture makers. Builders use 1-inch, high-density fiberboard for stair treads, among other things. It is extremely strong, dense and will not squeak, no matter how many people walk on it or how much weight is placed on it. You can add bullnose edges to high-density fiberboard stair treads with a rotary tool and a router table attachment or a handheld multipurpose tool with a routing bit, and then sand and finish the treads. High-density fiberboard will retain any shape that is cut or routed into it.

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Six Squared Studios sells bases. Not sure if hardboard = MDF, though.

 

 

Hardboard "should" be MDF.  I've never encountered anyone who used that name and meant something else.

 

Hardboard does = MDF.

We changed the wording from MDF to hardboard because some versions of MDF are weak and not well-liked, especially in the US.

 

 

 

 

I'm not fond of MDF myself and prefer Litko's plywood bases but it does make a huge difference on how big your bases are. If you are using plywood for a base, especially with larger sizes it must be finished on both sides to avoid warping.

 

And yes MDF is a hardboard, but hardboard is not necessarily MDF. If I walk into a lumber yard or home depot and ask for Hardboard I would expect to be shown Hardboard, not MDF.

 

Hardboard is a composite material created by compressing small particles with glue in a hydraulic press. A typical piece of 3/4-inch hardboard will begin the process as a 4-inch-thick pile of small wood particles or sawdust. When the sawdust is compressed with heat under intense pressure it forms hardboard. The density of the finished product depends on the size of particles.

 

Having tried both, I will stick with MDF - the plywood was just plain awful, even on a 2 inch base.

 

MDF has a better finish, and did not warp into an unuseable shape. And I have used it on a 2 inch by 6 inch base - which would have given the plywood back problems.

 

The plywood was a piece of crap.

 

Thanks, Litko.

 

The Auld Grump

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Well, now I'm just straight up confuzzled all...

 

To me, hardboard is the dark brown, 1/8" to 1/4" style stuff I use for things like plugging holes under kitchen cabinets to keep the cats out and provide a non-carpet surface for a computer to sit on. This is reasonably strong-ish stuff, but can break. Also stuff used for pegboard.

 

MDF is teh evil in being obnoxiously heavy, used in cheap furniture, and can warp over time (I have shelves made of the stuff bowing from my game books).

 

Particle board plywood is flakes of wood pressed by glue in alternating layers. A pita to work with and prone to causing splinters.

 

Plywood is sheets of wood in alternating layers also a pita to work with because the edges can splinter when trying to do non-straight cuts (tried to tell my mom this but she wouldn't listen and guess what happened)...

 

Am I wrong? Learn me some stuff because I have extra hardboard sitting around and if I can use it I'll pull out my jigsaw...

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"Particle board plywood is flakes of wood pressed by glue in alternating layers. A pita to work with and prone to causing splinters."

 

The stuff with relatively large pieces of wood is (IME) referred to as "chipboard". The stuff with smaller bits I've only heard of as "particle board", not "particle board plywood".

 

But names for these things change quite a bit with location, especially if you go to a different country.

 

MDF isn't very good as a structural material, but for non-load-bearing objects, my experience has been good. This specifically includes miniatures bases. However, I live in a low-humidity area; your results might be different in, say, the Mississippi Delta.

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"Particle board plywood is flakes of wood pressed by glue in alternating layers. A pita to work with and prone to causing splinters."

 

The stuff with relatively large pieces of wood is (IME) referred to as "chipboard". The stuff with smaller bits I've only heard of as "particle board", not "particle board plywood".

 

But names for these things change quite a bit with location, especially if you go to a different country.

 

MDF isn't very good as a structural material, but for non-load-bearing objects, my experience has been good. This specifically includes miniatures bases. However, I live in a low-humidity area; your results might be different in, say, the Mississippi Delta.

Let's add additional confusion... ::P: Some types of plywood use alternating sheets of wood all the way through, some things that get referred to as "plywood" have a particle core with a single sheet of wood on either side. Occasionally you'll even run into MDF-core plywood. Plus other variations, of course (e.g. baltic birch plywood & appleply, which are basically normal plywood but with much thinner layers). All of them have their uses.

 

And non-wood-obsessed folks tend to lump almost any kind of sheet good into the category of "plywood", which doesn't help.

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