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This IS barbaric splendor!  Great composition and painting - and I love the use of the large parchment on the wall; I have one of that artist's pieces, he does great work. I never would have thought to shrink and print one out like that - brilliant!  Congratulations barbarian brother!

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Thanks Erif and Primeval! 

 

...and I love the use of the large parchment on the wall; I have one of that artist's pieces, he does great work. I never would have thought to shrink and print one out like that - brilliant!  Congratulations barbarian brother!

I did that for the book in his hand and the book on the table as well, they are much harder to see tho.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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I love everything about this piece!!!
 

Excellent work, great atmosphere!

 

Congrats on the gold pin!

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Thanks Erif and Primeval! 

 

...and I love the use of the large parchment on the wall; I have one of that artist's pieces, he does great work. I never would have thought to shrink and print one out like that - brilliant!  Congratulations barbarian brother!

I did that for the book in his hand and the book on the table as well, they are much harder to see tho.

 

I am absolutely stealing that idea at some point!

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very well done Ub3r!    This is definitely Conan like and I am sure in a few seconds he will be slicing the wizard in half while holding the princess tight against his chest!

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Thanks for all the compliments and congrats everyone! I'm so happy with how this turned out.

 

I may try to clean it up a bit more with some of the finer details and then bring it along to enter into the ReaperCon competition this year. ::D:

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