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mrxak

Introduction - mrxak

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Welcome to our Asylum away from Home!

 

First Tutorial I point everyone to is how to paint eyes, cause everyone hates them!

 

There is a lot of good information on this forum, I'll link a few:

 

Brushes-   http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/61669-lets-talk-about-paint-brushes/

 

The most important tool in your box. Don't skimp on your brushes!

 

Wet Palette-   http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/64455-wet-pallet-painting-will-never-be-the-same/

 

                       http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/64195-help-there-is-something-wrong-with-my-wet-palette/?hl=%2Bwet+%2Bpalette

 

The third most important tool in your box, the second is good paint....

 

The Database-   http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/65355-directory-of-tips-advice-resources/

 

All sorts of tips and tricks there.

 

Some suggestions,

 

Post pics as you work in the 'Works in Progress' section!

People will comment there, and they will be able to see what you are doing, so to better judge what to tell you.

 

Ask questions as you do your work!

People here love to help! If one person doesn't have the answer, someone else will!

 

Most important----> Have FUN!! If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right!

 

George

 

And pay no attention to the Tangerine Goblin in the air duct....

Edited by knarthex
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You managed the most important rule, you had fun!

 

I think you're putting it down easily and where it goes, so the next trick is thinning your paints. It'll be easier once you get them home to paint.

 

Welcome to the lifelong soul crushing habit of mini painting, we all float down here!

 

 

 

Loth

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Welcome to the forum, first and foremost!

 

Secondly, thanks for sharing your work and please enjoy your time here.

 

George (knarthex) pointed you in the right direction where a lot of tutorials are located.  What in particular are you looking to do with faces and hair?

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Welcome to Painters Anonymous the forum.

 

Knarthex has given some great tips.

You are doing it right if you have fun.

 

Might I also point out that if you go to youtube and search for "painting fantasy miniatures" you will find some very useful tutorials?

 

Ask around and browse this forum, there is a lot to learn and enjoy here.

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Thank you knarthex for the eyes tutorial. I look forward to trying it out. I have some great brushes already. I also heard that for the tiniest of details a straight pin can be used to deposit a very small droplet of paint, like for the dot in the middle of an eye.

 

I've also picked up a headband magnifier thingy and some nice new desk lights for when I actually get to work. I'll be getting a work surface soon. I also don't have a palette yet of any sort.

 

Speaking of, I'm a little confused as to what a wet palette actually does for me. I see in those topics people saying in general terms that they're great, but not a lot of specifics as to why. Could somebody explain that a bit?

 

Thanks for the encouragement to post in the WIP forum. I think I'll do just that when the time comes. I don't actually have any paints yet, I'm waiting to pick them up in a couple months from Reaper's booth at PAX East, since I live locally and I'll be busy until then anyway. I do have a bunch of unpainted minis though that I picked up last week and my mind is already churning. Maybe shortly before PAX East I'll start a topic for one or two of them, and start discussing some of my plans and get advice on what paints to buy. There's some cool ones in there: 77049 Arthrand Nightblade, 77020 Bathalian D'khul, 77056 Orc Sniper, 77204 Cassiata, and a few others. They're all ones I've looked at repeatedly but didn't feel confident I could do justice to in just a one hour paint demo at a convention. I also went through the entire Bones collection here on Reaper's website this past week and made a list of every single mini I'd ever need for a level 1-8 D&D campaign. Basically a shopping list, lol. I can see this is likely going to turn into a pretty expensive and time-consuming hobby, but I know I'll enjoy every minute of it. Since I'm doing this for tabletop gaming rather than display, I know I'll have plenty of opportunities to learn from and improve with subsequent duplicate minis in a given encounter group. The WIP forum would be a great place to document and get advice during that process. That's a great suggestion.

 

Loth, do you have any specific advice on paint thinning and how it'd help me in the minis I posted images of? Please don't hesitate to criticize. That goes for everyone else, too, who's hitting the "like this" button on my OP but hasn't posted a reply. I can't learn if I don't get feedback. Tell me what I'm doing right, tell me what I'm doing wrong. I'd really appreciate it, and I've got the thickest skin of anyone I know.

 

ub3r_n3rd, thanks for the welcome. I guess I'm most interested in figuring out how to make hair and skin look realistic since that's definitely not something I'm doing well right now. Looking around at examples and thinking about it some, I think what I should be doing is doing some washing and drybrushing to give it some depth and natural-looking variation in color. That's something I'll have to experiment with when I'm able to really dedicate time to it. Does that sound like I'm on the right track? As for skin, I don't really know. For example, what could I do with the Orc Berserker, or Sarah the Seeress, to give some definition to their anatomies? Some kind of paint blending? A video I just watched gave me the idea to maybe paint some highlights and then glaze over it a bit, but I'm just guessing here.

 

Thanks for the welcome, sirgourls!

 

I'll try to find some more video tutorials at your suggestion, Xherman1964.

 

I also posted some questions on the advice forum as I've run into terms and ideas I'm not totally sure I understand.

Edited by mrxak
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A Wet palette stops the paint from drying out, so it stays the same consistency from you 'drip it' out and mix it, till the last brushstroke. It can keep the paint good for days, as I understand it.

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A Wet palette stops the paint from drying out, so it stays the same consistency from you 'drip it' out and mix it, till the last brushstroke. It can keep the paint good for days, as I understand it.

 

This!

 

If you have mixed some colours, you can keep the mix intact. It not easy to get the exact mix right every time. A wet palette helps.

I use both a wet and a dry palette.

The wet I use for my mixes when painting bigger models, I need to get back to those and I want my paint to last.

 

For small work I use the dry/normal palette, use just a few drops of paint which will be consumed during the session.

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Welcome to the hobby and the forum!

 

Thinning paint-

http://www.reapermini.com/TheCraft/15

 

Hair- this ones on red hair but the technique can be applied to most other colors.

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/63774-painting-red-hair-tutorial/?hl=hair

 

The online store- They have paints in there ya know, then they put em in a package and in a few days...you have paint. ;-)

http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore

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Welcome to the hobby and the forum!

 

Thinning paint-

http://www.reapermini.com/TheCraft/15

 

Hair- this ones on red hair but the technique can be applied to most other colors.

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/63774-painting-red-hair-tutorial/?hl=hair

 

The online store- They have paints in there ya know, then they put em in a package and in a few days...you have paint. ;-)

http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore

 

Ah, thanks a lot for that link to thinning paint and I'll definitely have to dig into that hair topic. That's exactly what I'm looking for.

 

I do know they sell paint online, but as I said I don't really have the time yet to really get into it, and I'd rather pick up paints in person when I can go through and really look at them. I think they run a special at PAX, anyway.

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Welcome to the hobby and the forum!

Thinning paint-http://www.reapermini.com/TheCraft/15

Hair- this ones on red hair but the technique can be applied to most other colors.http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/63774-painting-red-hair-tutorial/?hl=hair

The online store- They have paints in there ya know, then they put em in a package and in a few days...you have paint. ;-)http://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore

 

 

Ah, thanks a lot for that link to thinning paint and I'll definitely have to dig into that hair topic. That's exactly what I'm looking for.

 

I do know they sell paint online, but as I said I don't really have the time yet to really get into it, and I'd rather pick up paints in person when I can go through and really look at them. I think they run a special at PAX, anyway.

Lol, I'm just teasing you.

 

 

Buy some paint.

 

 

;-)

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mrxak,

 

Welcome and great work so far! I love the amount of thought you put into each project and really envisioning the world these characters live in, their motivations, etc.

 

Will you be revisiting the minis you've already completed after you get your own supplies? I understand you were on a time crunch when initially painting them, but some have a lot of details waiting to be fleshed out that would bring them to life even more.

 

I definitely recommend getting a good wash or two. The one I use is the Citadel Earthshade (I'm sure the good folks here can recommend some others). My friendly local game store employee suggested it and called it "liquid talent" and it really is. Once you're done with the mini you just apply it liberally with a large brush, much the same as how you'd apply a base coat to the entire mini. Make sure it pools to some extent in the crevices of the mini and it really adds an amazing amount of depth and character for the absurdly small amount of time it takes to apply.

 

Per Loth's comment about thinning paints (he gave me the same advice, to which I've been meaning to reply and thank him for)... The tutorial tiniest rhombus posted is great and definitely worth reading, but the tl;dr is this (disclaimer: this is from my limited experience, so take it with a grain of salt) unthinned paints can easily obscure detail on the mini because they're so thick. Some small details can be subdued or even lost with just one coat of unthinned paint. Well-thinned paint can be applied in several layers and not cover the topography and detail of the mini. It definitely takes getting used to brush control with thinned paint if you're used to unthinned, but there are also some advantages as brush control goes. Since the paint is more fluid, it's much easier for me to spread thinned paint around inside an area that's nestled between higher areas that I don't want to get that paint on. Unthinned is still easier for applying very fine detail for me (buttons, belt buckles, irises/pupils).

 

I'd definitely recommend getting used to it as soon as possible though, as its a very valuable technique and the sooner you try it out, the less time it will take to relearn brush control from unthinned paints.

 

Another great technique I learned from board member Engineer Jeff in a video tutorial he posted of painting a gnoll. It involves blending highlights with a highly diluted version of the base color. Very handy at adding depth and life to a mini, and quite simple!

 

On a side note are you DMing your DND campaign? I find myself skimping on game prep and world building in favor of painting more minis haha

 

Sorry for the wall of text! Welcome and keep up the great work!

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mrxak,

 

Welcome and great work so far! I love the amount of thought you put into each project and really envisioning the world these characters live in, their motivations, etc.

 

Will you be revisiting the minis you've already completed after you get your own supplies? I understand you were on a time crunch when initially painting them, but some have a lot of details waiting to be fleshed out that would bring them to life even more.

 

I definitely recommend getting a good wash or two. The one I use is the Citadel Earthshade (I'm sure the good folks here can recommend some others). My friendly local game store employee suggested it and called it "liquid talent" and it really is. Once you're done with the mini you just apply it liberally with a large brush, much the same as how you'd apply a base coat to the entire mini. Make sure it pools to some extent in the crevices of the mini and it really adds an amazing amount of depth and character for the absurdly small amount of time it takes to apply.

 

Per Loth's comment about thinning paints (he gave me the same advice, to which I've been meaning to reply and thank him for)... The tutorial tiniest rhombus posted is great and definitely worth reading, but the tl;dr is this (disclaimer: this is from my limited experience, so take it with a grain of salt) unthinned paints can easily obscure detail on the mini because they're so thick. Some small details can be subdued or even lost with just one coat of unthinned paint. Well-thinned paint can be applied in several layers and not cover the topography and detail of the mini. It definitely takes getting used to brush control with thinned paint if you're used to unthinned, but there are also some advantages as brush control goes. Since the paint is more fluid, it's much easier for me to spread thinned paint around inside an area that's nestled between higher areas that I don't want to get that paint on. Unthinned is still easier for applying very fine detail for me (buttons, belt buckles, irises/pupils).

 

I'd definitely recommend getting used to it as soon as possible though, as its a very valuable technique and the sooner you try it out, the less time it will take to relearn brush control from unthinned paints.

 

Another great technique I learned from board member Engineer Jeff in a video tutorial he posted of painting a gnoll. It involves blending highlights with a highly diluted version of the base color. Very handy at adding depth and life to a mini, and quite simple!

 

On a side note are you DMing your DND campaign? I find myself skimping on game prep and world building in favor of painting more minis haha

 

Sorry for the wall of text! Welcome and keep up the great work!

 

Thanks for your kind words. Yeah I definitely like to think of each one as a story, not just a game piece. Getting into their world helps me figure out what they ought to look like. When I have time to really put the finishing touches on a mini without any distractions and have proper brushes, lighting, magnification, I feel that'll really come out. Stuff like putting dings in armor, rips in clothes, or even war paint. Is this goblin the runt of the tribe or does he bully his way into the best loot and has a shinier sword? What's the story behind that fighter's pendant? Is that dagger used for ceremonies or does she use it to eat with when she's not fighting?

 

I think what I'll probably do is just get new minis for the ones I already did, and redo them with these early ones as reference for color and stuff. There's a couple I think are good enough that I'd just do some touch-up work and add some detail to, but I sort of like the idea of starting fresh with what I've already learned, do it right from the start with a solid plan. Some of them, as I said, were really a mess and even if I got them to a decent point at the time, any more work on them would just lose even more detail. Garrick is particularly bad with his helmet and plate armor, it's just layer and layer of thick paint. A lot of these I'd like to have multiples of anyway, for game encounters. It'll be nice to compare minis and see how far I've come.

 

I'm definitely looking forward to doing more washes, and trying out thinned paints at home. Those are the sorts of things you don't really have time for in a 1 hour demo paint unless you really know what you're doing. It's a lot of fun, but I've only seen very few people actually use advanced techniques and finish before their time's up. Those are the people everyone else at the tables are in awe with. One thing I've noticed about this hobby, though, is how friendly and helpful everyone is. Those amazing painters having a bit of fun among the first-timers share a lot of their knowledge with anyone who asks. I'm glad that's true so far online as well.

 

These days I don't really seem to play D&D at all, unless Wizards of the Coast is doing 1, 2, or 4 hour dungeon delves at a convention. If they're not around, Pathfinder Society usually is. When it comes to D&D I'm almost always the DM running some sort of homebrew campaign. Mostly though I've been doing games with virtual tables online and hosting games over Skype or some other voice chat software, with friends scattered about the country. So, no real need for miniatures, and my prep work is pretty much just world building and encounter planning. I've been wanting to get back to doing in-person games though, and I know for that I'll need some proper miniatures. That I can combine the fun of DMing with the fun of painting minis is a pretty sweet deal. I'm also interested in using table props. I got some great fantasy coins from a Kickstarter a while back that I've been itching to use. I've also been interested in various other arts and crafts. Mapmaking, aging paper, that sort of thing. At this point I've run the same several homebrew campaigns over and over again for a few different groups, so I don't have to spend too much time anymore on world building or encounter planning, really. I've had to update the system a couple times since they date back to 3.5, but I can really start to dedicate more time to the table experience with great minis, great props, etc. I'm sure I'll be building my own sets before long!

 

I definitely don't mind reading (or writing  :;):) long posts.

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