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It is actually a piece of cheap molding that was a laminate that is cut to 2 1/2 inches.

I sanded the heck out of it, and the stain added that extra depth of a barrel to it.

Getting the wire armature into that base for the tree was a bear.

the hand drill was having one tough time going through all the glue in this.

Next time, a piece of good old pine, or maybe it is time to break out the real drill

for the basing stuff !

Thanks for your comment :)

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Well done!  I like the placement and I sympathize about the base.  I wish DSM and a few others would go to slotta bases, it makes getting the base off much easier.  the DSM bases are hard to hide and hard to remove.  Nice job on getting them at least somewhat disguised. 

 

I have been carving indents into my bases to make the base sub surface.  Still working on the process though...

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 Nice!  :B):

 

For drilling holes for things like armatures, particularly through materials other than metal, a hobby-sized Dremel tool on low power with the appropriately-sized bit gives you both good speed and good control.

 

The tree looks good, but one minor note would be that palm trees generally have fairly straight, even trunks without a lot of variation in their width other than tapering off towards the top, and their bark is generally either a series of horizontal rings around the tree or looks like overlapping scales with the points facing upward...

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Thanks for the wonderful comments.

@Ub3r, Since this is a new area for me, I figured I had to just step off the pier, and get wet.

I had some major issues develop (including the armature for palm pulling out as green stuff dried LOL.

I thought the glue had set already..Surprise !!!

Thanks for your input Jack, will make a note of your comment, and your image.

Arc, cracked me up, never thought of the Rum Barrel, but hey, that does fit !

Thanks for that comment.

Citrine, you are such a master baser, that a comment from you made me smile.

Thanks Inara, and of course Malafactus.  Your praise made me glad that I chose the colors I did.

I put a couple of coconuts in there in your honor !  chuckle.

THanks again for your critiques, and your comments.  They are valuable to me.

Edited by Jasonator
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Thanks Minibart;

I was trying to avoid covering the top with sand, but seeing it through your eyes, well, you're right !

I painted the edges; but they would look better if I brought sand out to the ends of the wood.

I'll wrap the block with tape, and glue down more sand on the outside, and tint it a bit, to make it

look more complete.  Thanks for the tip !

Learning, learning, and more learning !

Jay

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Thanks Minibart;

I was trying to avoid covering the top with sand, but seeing it through your eyes, well, you're right !

I painted the edges; but they would look better if I brought sand out to the ends of the wood.

I'll wrap the block with tape, and glue down more sand on the outside, and tint it a bit, to make it

look more complete.  Thanks for the tip !

Learning, learning, and more learning !

Jay

If you use some painters tape, wrap it all the way around and some realistic water, you could do some ocean water at the edges :;):

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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Nice Job!  Not normally a fan of anthropomorphic figures, but this is well done!

Thanks Minibart;

I was trying to avoid covering the top with sand, but seeing it through your eyes, well, you're right !

I painted the edges; but they would look better if I brought sand out to the ends of the wood.

I'll wrap the block with tape, and glue down more sand on the outside, and tint it a bit, to make it

look more complete.  Thanks for the tip !

Learning, learning, and more learning !

Jay

I think what Minibart meant was to put more  sand around the metal base of the mini. There is a distinct 'hump' where the sand flows down to the mini's base and goes up, across the base, and then down..

You can 'see' the original bases outline, a few layers of glue and sand should take care of that.

 

George

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