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SDub Tutorial: Basing

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Hey reaper mini forum! Got another beginner video about basing your miniatures! Please give any feedback regarding the content/video :)

 

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I watched the video.  Great vid.  I got to the end and then realized, ..... wait...  where are the cuts? Much improved!  ;D

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I have some constructive criticism, but I will hold it back until it is actually asked-for.

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Please give any feedback regarding the content/video :)

Solid basic basing tutorial. I didn't notice any bad advice and for beginners (your announced audience) it's probably just about the right amount of detail. Good sound, effective video.

 

I might have mentioned Silflor as another basing materials company, but their stuff is more expensive. (Their website is very dangerous to your wallet.)

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CHICKEN!

 

Great job. Very informative for the basics, you made me laugh with that cardboard strapped to your feet (hilarious!) and the cuts were muuuuuch improved.

 

Woo! Encore! Encore!

 

Also... Scenic Express... they hurt the wallet but such sweet sweet basing material :wub: (and they have a wishlist - danger!).

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I have some constructive criticism, but I will hold it back until it is actually asked-for.

 

Hit me with your best shot, fire away.

 

 

Woohoo! No more unecessary J-cuts! Someone noticed they didn't notice! Thanks, Dixon :) I've never heard of  Scenic Express or Silflor, so, there goes my tax return :|

 

Thanks for the positive feedback, guys! :)

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I have some constructive criticism, but I will hold it back until it is actually asked-for.

Hit me with your best shot, fire away.

 

 

Woohoo! No more unecessary J-cuts! Someone noticed they didn't notice! Thanks, Dixon :) I've never heard of Scenic Express or Silflor, so, there goes my tax return :|

 

Thanks for the positive feedback, guys! :)

I blame Knarthax for pointing me at Scenic Express. I now have 4 bags of 48 ounces each of basing ground cover. I'm set for four or five lifetimes. <_<

 

And there's still more I want... like that English Ivy :wub:

Edited by Kheprera
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Also... Scenic Express... they hurt the wallet but such sweet sweet basing material :wub: (and they have a wishlist - danger!).

Hobby crack.

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I have some constructive criticism, but I will hold it back until it is actually asked-for.

 

Hit me with your best shot, fire away.

 

 

Woohoo! No more unecessary J-cuts! Someone noticed they didn't notice! Thanks, Dixon :) I've never heard of  Scenic Express or Silflor, so, there goes my tax return :|

 

Thanks for the positive feedback, guys! :)

 

Make that two who noticed that they didn't notice the cuts.      Much smoother to watch.

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Huh. I didn't notice the invitation for some reason.

 

Well, anyway, I would tighten up the terminology. For instance, you keep calling dirt "terrain." As in, you got some terrain on the side of your base after you dipped the base in the terrain.

 

Most of the hobby industry uses the term "terrain" to mean a scenic element, complete or in a stage of completeness. That hill covered in grass and trees is terrain. The sand you sprinkled onto it before painting is sand.

 

That might sound petty. But standardization can do a lot to help a newbie get acclimated more quickly and it helps the whole hobby generally.

 

I also thought it interesting that you apply straight Elmers before adding the ballast, and then you later coat it with watered Elmers. I was taught long ago, by grognards who knew exactly what they were doing, to use watered down white glue the first time, and long experience has taught me that it works and you don't then have to coat it again. I promise you that if you water your glue down on the first pass, you will not have those little patches of bare base and you likely will not lose any of the dirt. Why? Capillary action. The drier, straight glue sits flat on the base and contacts the particles of dirt on only one side (the underside). Watered glue encircles the lower portions of each particle, grabbing onto them and bonding them to their neighbors. Moreover, if you try to do another pass with wetter glue, you run the risk of reactivating the original glue, and you might lose more ballast. This will force you to add more back when it is wet. Which you could have done in the first place.

 

Finally, I think the word you want when tightening up the color around the edge of the base at the end, is "crisp." "Crispy" is what happens when you burn chicken. "Crisp" is when you tighten something up and make it look neat and presentable. Okay, that last part is petty, but I am a language fascist and that sort of thing drives me nuts.

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Bruunwald, thank you for your feedback. I really appreciate it! 

 

I have never tested putting down watered glue first. Sounds interesting. Another unmentioned reason that I put glue down/primer atop the sand is because it makes the finished product look better for me. For some reason, the detail that is lost via putting a coat of PVA glue over the sand makes it look more like a piece of the sculpt than if I hadn't. 

 

Thanks for the kind words, Blubbernaught :)

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Bruunwald, thank you for your feedback. I really appreciate it! 

 

I have never tested putting down watered glue first. Sounds interesting. Another unmentioned reason that I put glue down/primer atop the sand is because it makes the finished product look better for me. For some reason, the detail that is lost via putting a coat of PVA glue over the sand makes it look more like a piece of the sculpt than if I hadn't. 

 

Thanks for the kind words, Blubbernaught :)

It's not uncommon to add ballast to a base before priming. Many, many modellers do that. For me, it depends on what the mini is, what sort of base, and whether I am feeling lazy at the start of a project.

 

I can understand the masking effect you are getting, but I have a feeling you will see the same thing if you do a wet application of glue on the first pass. Here's why: the same capillary action I mentioned earlier draws the particles together and locks them, and stacks them as well. You get much more ballast per square millimeter into the same space you would have using the "dry glue" method, both vertically and horizontally. Difference is, you're filling those spaces with a combination of increased ballast and glue, rather than just glue.

 

Try it out.

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It looks like you are planning out your video beforehand. Scripting dialogue to some degree? Storyboarding the cuts and scenes? I'm curious. If you were willing to open the process up before you shoot and edit, there may be some tips to glean before going live. It's just a thought.

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It looks like you are planning out your video beforehand. Scripting dialogue to some degree? Storyboarding the cuts and scenes? I'm curious. If you were willing to open the process up before you shoot and edit, there may be some tips to glean before going live. It's just a thought.

 

I will divulge all my secrets, no problem. The very first thing I do in my process is film the demo (the part that acts as b-roll) of what I'm actually talking about. Often times this reminds me of some of the smaller details regarding the process I'm shooting a tutorial for. I then write the entire script shooting for 1.5 - 2 pages worth of content. This usually turns into a 5-7 minute video. I have someone edit it for content missing/grammar, give it a final once-over reading it aloud and then I shoot it. I sit in front of the camera with all my lights and mic set up, and memorize 3-4 sentences at a time reading them off my phone. I prefer memorizing the lines as opposed to a teleprompter because I like bloopers, and I also like the intimacy and naturalness of staring directly into the camera lens. After this, I rough edit all the segments, re-watch the video while reading the script to make sure I didn't put anything out of order or miss something entirely, and then I do more minute edits, add b-roll, add the bumper, the intro sequence, and finally sweeten all the audio. Then I re-watch it like 2 times or so to see if I missed anything. If not, I render it out and publish it to youtube a few days in advance, add all the info cards, annotations, descriptions, etc. 

 

The process takes maybe 20-25 hours. I would love to streamline it, if possible. Recommend anything you'd like! :)

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