Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tutu_beater

vehicle highlighting

Recommended Posts

On 4/14/2016 at 10:56 PM, Jokemeister said:

I have to admit that the idea of a camouflage paint pattern on a giant mech always bugged me.

 

I would expect mechs to rely on sensors rather than the pilot eyeballing targets through his window.  In that sense, I wouldn't expect any type of camouflage to have any impact on the mechs ability to "see" you.

 

From the point of view of a human, I can't help but think that the camouflage is wasted.  I can't really imagine any situation where you wouldn't notice a gigantic steel behemoth - but then, I never saw the gorilla either so <shrug>.

 

Late reply to this, but while camouflage is ostensibly for disguise it should be noted that in the historical record of the 20th Century nearly everybody used quite different camouflage.  WWI allied planes had splotches, germans used lozenge.  WW2 German tanks started out dark grey, then evolved to yellow with assorted patterns of green/brown - much US equipment was just olive drab.  French tanks were colorful.  Not to mention that the disguise benefits of camouflage were frequently undone by the liberal application of garish recognition markings (D-Day stripes would, I think, count here).  

 

So camouflage, to whatever extent it might be effective for its original purpose, also serves as a faction identifier in the real world.  As to the sensor argument, rather a lot of military equipment shows up quite well on FLIR but we still paint tanks to suit the environment.  Even if the M1 Abrams was nicknamed "Whispering Death" by other NATO tankers, we would not expect it to be able to sneak up on infantry without being noticed no matter what colour it was.  It's relatively quiet, as tanks go, but not that stealthy.  

 

So camouflage is part disguise, part identifier, part tradition.  Whatever the evolution of particular Mech Houses, we would expect that they have their own evolution of military tradition and could expect this to appear in certain camouflage patterns and colours.  But, since the sensor argument is still a valid one then we have an excuse for the occasional more garish scheme.  But!  Brave is the commander who sallies forth in a highly-visible mech, for while maybe no mech can hide from sensors there is perhaps something to be said for blending in with the other members of "the herd" and not attracting the attention of every railgun, plasma weapon, proton cannon, and missile battery of the enemy side just because you wanted to look distinguishably cool.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the subject of camouflage, I think it's biggest modern day/future use is most likely going to be to misidentification, particularly in terms of intelligence gathering.

If you're using untrained or civilian sources, or having to do long range and/or quick "drive by" surveillance, some clever camo can make it a lot harder to identify exactly what your enemy has. Sure, you may identify right off the bat they have 50 tanks gathering in a staging area, but it might take longer to determine what kind of tanks those 50 are.  In a fluid and fast paced combat environment, you go for every micro advantage you can get.  

That's why car makers are using it - it doesn't stop the spy photos, but it slows down the reporters talking about their new cars:
camo-audia8.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, buglips*the*goblin said:

...

 

So camouflage is part disguise, part identifier, part tradition.  Whatever the evolution of particular Mech Houses, we would expect that they have their own evolution of military tradition and could expect this to appear in certain camouflage patterns and colours.  But, since the sensor argument is still a valid one then we have an excuse for the occasional more garish scheme.  But!  Brave is the commander who sallies forth in a highly-visible mech, for while maybe no mech can hide from sensors there is perhaps something to be said for blending in with the other members of "the herd" and not attracting the attention of every railgun, plasma weapon, proton cannon, and missile battery of the enemy side just because you wanted to look distinguishably cool.  

 

I'll note that there is historical precedent for painting in highly recognizable colors for a combination of raising you own unit morale and demoralizing the enemy: Jagdgeschwader 1 (the Flying Circus) in WWI made no effort at camouflage, instead preferring that each pilot be individually recognizable. I'll also note that this tradition didn't last. :poke:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If we want to talk about counter-intuitive camouflage, during WW1, they used Dazzle Camouflage on several ships.

 

356px-USS_West_Mahomet_(ID-3681)_croppeddazzle-painting-ship.jpg?w=674&h=449

 

Not unlike what @kristof65 said about car manufacturers. Viewed from the right angle, the actual size, shape, speed, range, etc. of the target would be harder to determine. And any second of hesitation would give you one more precious second to retaliate.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the main uses of camouflage is for blending in at a distance from aircraft, especially fast moving ground attack aircraft.

Those pilots, flying NOE, have quite a lot to do...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're going to be the most obvious thing in the landscape, the best you can probably do is look like something else obvious. I think there might be an interesting painting project in camouflaging your mech as, say, a water tower or grain elevator.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...