Jump to content

Open Letter to the Painting Community


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 132
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I agree with you completely, if the choice is between painting now and not painting now. 

 

However, I see nothing wrong with putting the sculpt you want to do the best paint job on at the end of your project queue, with the ones you don't care quite as much about coming first.

 

This comes with a caveat: Sculpts you don't want to paint should not be in your project queue in the first place.  They will simply discourage you and prevent you from reaching the one you want to do a good job on.

  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you completely, if the choice is between painting now and not painting now. 

 

However, I see nothing wrong with putting the sculpt you want to do the best paint job on at the end of your project queue, with the ones you don't care quite as much about coming first.

 

This comes with a caveat: Sculpts you don't want to paint should not be in your project queue in the first place.  They will simply discourage you and prevent you from reaching the one you want to do a good job on.

I put things at the end of my queue all the time, but they move up in the queue as I finish other projects, soon they are sitting in front of me to actually paint.

 

Exactly, if you like it enough that you went out and bought it, give it a shot. If you don't like it anymore, perhaps it's time to pass it along to someone who does (such as in a box of goodwill).

 

 

You're good enough,

You're smart enough,

And doggone it, people like it?

Yep! ::D:

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I see nothing wrong with putting the sculpt you want to do the best paint job on at the end of your project queue, with the ones you don't care quite as much about coming first.

The problem with that is it feeds into the negative feedback loop. While sure it's better to be painting /something/, I recommend painting stuff you really enjoy. Not only will the painting process by much more enjoyable, you will probably get better results due to your interest in the subject and increased enjoyment.

 

Do as I say, not as I do :p As a firm member of the 'I'm not good enough' club. Although I'm getting much better about that and now my primary hesitation is painting stuff that is limited edition or super expensive.

  • Like 14
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I see nothing wrong with putting the sculpt you want to do the best paint job on at the end of your project queue, with the ones you don't care quite as much about coming first.

The problem with that is it feeds into the negative feedback loop. While sure it's better to be painting /something/, I recommend painting stuff you really enjoy. Not only will the painting process by much more enjoyable, you will probably get better results due to your interest in the subject and increased enjoyment.

 

Do as I say, not as I do :p As a firm member of the 'I'm not good enough' club. Although I'm getting much better about that and now my primary hesitation is painting stuff that is limited edition or super expensive.

 

Dear Cash,

 

You are one of the best painters around these here parts, go paint those awesome figs you have been "waiting" to do. Just ask anyone around here, even the pros who come in and visit, they'll tell you the same thing.

 

Your friend,

ub3r

  • Like 14
Link to post
Share on other sites

...

 

Sculpts you don't want to paint should not be in your project queue in the first place.  They will simply discourage you and prevent you from reaching the one you want to do a good job on.

Life is too short to paint miniatures you don't like.

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

But to be less silly, you'll never think you're 'good enough'. It's just the way it is. It can be a healthy thing if channeled properly, by trying out the things your want to do to be 'good enough'.

 

For me, though I can do a lot of basic stuff relatively ok, my blending isn't where I want it, I don't have the interesting use of color I'd like to have as part of my style, etc (we won't even talk about basing). But the way out is through, so I try to keep in mind where I'd like to end up and then chip away at it little by little. There's usually a little experiment in everything I paint, sometimes it's obvious, sometimes not.

 

Anyway. Just keep in mind 'good enough' is a moving target you will never reach. You know when you'll be good enough? Tomorrow. Since it's always 'today', just paint stuff you enjoy!

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

But to be less silly, you'll never think you're 'good enough'. It's just the way it is. It can be a healthy thing if channeled properly, by trying out the things your want to do to be 'good enough'.

 

For me, though I can do a lot of basic stuff relatively ok, my blending isn't where I want it, I don't have the interesting use of color I'd like to have as part of my style, etc (we won't even talk about basing). But the way out is through, so I try to keep in mind where I'd like to end up and then chip away at it little by little. There's usually a little experiment in everything I paint, sometimes it's obvious, sometimes not.

 

Anyway. Just keep in mind 'good enough' is a moving target you will never reach. You know when you'll be good enough? Tomorrow. Since it's always 'today', just paint stuff you enjoy!

To me, you are one of the painters I absolutely look up to here. I'm not just blowing smoke up your elf. Troo story, your works inspire me to get better and when I see your stuff, I'm always going, "I need to up my game and do something that awesome!" So when I hear you say you don't think your blendings are good enough or something isn't where you want it, it honestly makes me kinda sad. I think you don't give yourself nearly the credit you deserve in our hobby. There are reasons why people admire your work and even professionals like Jess tell you that you are good enough, YOU ARE good enough to do anything you set your mind to, there is no "perfect" in our hobby, there's only that 99% and moving on to the next fun project. As you said, just have fun, if this means you try your hand at "easier" sculpts before moving on, then do so, but really, give a gift to the community and try out some of those other sculpts you've been afraid of. Don't let fear be the mind killer ::P:

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

But to be less silly, you'll never think you're 'good enough'. It's just the way it is. It can be a healthy thing if channeled properly, by trying out the things your want to do to be 'good enough'.

 

For me, though I can do a lot of basic stuff relatively ok, my blending isn't where I want it, I don't have the interesting use of color I'd like to have as part of my style, etc (we won't even talk about basing). But the way out is through, so I try to keep in mind where I'd like to end up and then chip away at it little by little. There's usually a little experiment in everything I paint, sometimes it's obvious, sometimes not.

 

Anyway. Just keep in mind 'good enough' is a moving target you will never reach. You know when you'll be good enough? Tomorrow. Since it's always 'today', just paint stuff you enjoy!

To me, you are one of the painters I absolutely look up to here. I'm not just blowing smoke up your elf. Troo story, your works inspire me to get better and when I see your stuff, I'm always going, "I need to up my game and do something that awesome!" So when I hear you say you don't think your blendings are good enough or something isn't where you want it, it honestly makes me kinda sad. I think you don't give yourself nearly the credit you deserve in our hobby. There are reasons why people admire your work and even professionals like Jess tell you that you are good enough, YOU ARE good enough to do anything you set your mind to, there is no "perfect" in our hobby, there's only that 99% and moving on to the next fun project. As you said, just have fun, if this means you try your hand at "easier" sculpts before moving on, then do so, but really, give a gift to the community and try out some of those other sculpts you've been afraid of. Don't let fear be the mind killer ::P:

 

Dunning-Kruger Effect.

 

When you're incompetent, you can't tell the difference between what you're doing and what competence looks like. As you get more competent, you are able to see more flaws in your work, so you can feel like you're moving backwards.

 

But it's nearly impossible to actually move forward without being able to see your flaws.

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...