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Gluing Problems

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Tryin' to glue metal figures together and the glue don't want to cooperate for whatever reason. Enthusiasm killer!

Too much glue? Surfaces not flush fit?

 

Those will do it.

 

Dip the parts in Isopropyl Alcohol to cleanse them to bare metal before re-attempting. (That is the I am in a hurry option; I am sensing impatience.)

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Some super glues don't act the same as others, so you may have a different or bad batch.  Too much is usually the problem for lack of initial tack though.  Too little, and it'll often break later--that's usually not the problem.  A good flush fit (no space for the glue to fill or pool) is ideal, and I often score/sand with the tip of an Xacto blade/file/sandpaper to rough it up too.

 

Are they large-ish pieces, perhaps in need of pinning for support?

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When glueing metal parts, make sure the parts fit, are washed and I always file or scrape a little to roughen them up, gives a better bond.

 

If all of this fails..use a tiny piece of greenstuff and then glue and press into the green stuff.

 

It will be very strong then.

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what they said ^^

 

plus, imo nvm the superglue, use metal glue or two part epoxy (I think it is). I've never had good luck with superglue tbh, although the greenstuff idea works usually too, just requires bit of effort. Also, yes definitely scoring, that can be very important in my experience.

 

oh and if you do use superglue, you may want to try accelerant for it. I haven't used it, but I know people who recommend it for bonding quickly (albeit usualy with plastic tiny parts). I don't know where to get it either sorry, but you could give it a go.

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But accelerant makes the bond brittle.

 

I think you can also use water if your in pinch, but I think it'll do the same thing.

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I use accelerant and while parts can be brittle, it usually isn't a major issue. If pinned or if it has decent surface area live not had parts fall off.

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I think Krazy Glue gel has a new formula.  It doesn't come in an orange tube anymore and all 4 of the new tubes I've tested exhibit unusual anomalies as they cure.  Specifically, they expand almost like foam and form what looks like tiny coral.

 

KG gel was my recommended glue of choice, so I figured I ought to report on this new behaviour.

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JB Weld or other epoxy for metal are the best.  Cyanoacrylate based glues (i.e., super glue, et. al.) by nature have a high pull strength and a low shear resistance.  That means they can hold a man's weight, but if hit from the side will break off (i.e., if you drop the mini the parts will likely break off or loosen).  Epoxy glues have both a high pull and high shear resistance.  Yes they take a long time to set up, but I've found that a few days time is typically worth it to ensure that my minis stay together for life.  

 

One note on clamping epoxy joints for drying (I typically leave them for a number of hours equal to the minute rating, which is the working time, not cure time), is to use a bin of damp sand and use it to immobilize the parts while curing.  don't let the sand touch the joint or it may stick to some exposes glue.

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I ran into this problem while assembling minis from a Kickstarter I had backed recently.  My usual discount store brand wouldn't bond no matter what I tried.  Ended up buying a bottle of Gorilla Glue Gel and in under a minute the parts bonded.  Even dropped a mini from waist high to the floor and it stayed together.

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I use 5-minute epoxy for anything load-bearing, or in cases where superglue just isn't doing the job.  Superglue is nice for little fiddly bits that don't have to put up with much weight or handling, and it's great for resin and especially bones.  5-minute epoxy does wonders for metal though.  Wonders.

 

Edit:  Gorilla is the brand of superglue I use as well.  I can vouch for it's efficacy.  My epoxy used to be LePage, but since they changed formats from the separate tubes to the dual-syringe style, I've been looking around for a different brand.  I hate that dual-syringe.  Maybe it's just me but I always squeeze out too much or too little.  I preferred the little 5mL tubes where you could just squeeze out a little bit.

Edited by Ronald X
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JB Weld or other epoxy for metal are the best.

 

What he said.

 

I use JB Kwik (the fast-set version of JB Weld) for nearly all metal assembly now. I also pin everywhere I can.

 

Suspenders and belt, man!

 

IME, as long as you don't load the joint, once the working time is finished, or even nearly finished and the part isn't moving when you let go, you don't need to hold or clamp it anymore. But waiting 24 hours or so (pin today; work tomorrow -- it's the procrastinator's dream) is a good idea before putting pressure on the join.

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JB Weld or other epoxy for metal are the best.  Cyanoacrylate based glues (i.e., super glue, et. al.) by nature have a high pull strength and a low shear resistance.  That means they can hold a man's weight, but if hit from the side will break off (i.e., if you drop the mini the parts will likely break off or loosen).  Epoxy glues have both a high pull and high shear resistance.  Yes they take a long time to set up, but I've found that a few days time is typically worth it to ensure that my minis stay together for life.  

 

One note on clamping epoxy joints for drying (I typically leave them for a number of hours equal to the minute rating, which is the working time, not cure time), is to use a bin of damp sand and use it to immobilize the parts while curing.  don't let the sand touch the joint or it may stick to some exposes glue.

 

 +1 for JB Weld. I always pin metals too.

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