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Did Reaper use lead in these models?


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I don't think Reaper advertises its models as "lead-free", which would probably require regular testing and perhaps buying certified ingots. Instead, they advertise them as a "tin-based alloy" (from the FAQ). But if there's lead in there, there isn't much; you can tell that by the feel and the way they act when you work them.

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No. They discontinued the P-65 line. The budget and large figures are now done in Bones rather than a high-lead alloy.

 

Also, all the P-65 figures had SKUs that began with 65, so you could easily tell just from that.

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 Nobody's really used lead for years - regardless of the company you purchase from, you can be about 99% sure that the figures are white metal (mainly tin)... If they're not completely lead-free, the lead content is extremely small.

 

As far as Reaper's figures, all the figures are a tin alloy except for the Legendary Encounters pre-painted plastics (SKU numbers starting with 200) and the Bones unpainted plastics (SKU numbers starting with 770 and higher)...

 

The defunct P-65 line was only ever a side line of figures that were made of lead in order to be able to produce larger figures such as monsters at a reasonable cost - miniatures from the P-65 line were clearly marked on the packaging and are no longer produced. As mentioned, their SKU numbers started with 65. Whatever's left of them is only available now on the secondary market or perhaps in the old stock of some stores.

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 Nobody's really used lead for years - regardless of the company you purchase from, you can be about 99% sure that the figures are white metal (mainly tin)... If they're not completely lead-free, the lead content is extremely small.

 

Unless I'm much mistaken, that overstates the case.

 

Quite recently, and perhaps still, many military miniatures companies used lead-based alloys. Though most fantasy and SF miniatures (I think) are now cast in alloys with minimal lead.

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Frankly the scare about lead in miniatures was always over-hyped.  You would just about have to grind a miniature to dust and snort it to ingest enough from a figure to matter.

 

That having been said, I'm glad we've switched to harder metal as it holds detail better and doesn't deform as easily.

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Frankly the scare about lead in miniatures was always over-hyped.  You would just about have to grind a miniature to dust and snort it to ingest enough from a figure to matter.

 

It's not clear even that would cause a significant health hazard (though I certainly wouldn't recommend it  ^_^ ).

 

The New York attempt at banning lead miniatures involved using a masticating machine to continuously chew lead miniatures, which was not, by itself, enough to reach the maxima allowed for the most at-risk population (children under 2). The bioavailability of metallic lead is very low. Lead salts, OTOH, such as those used to make flake white (the white pigment in many lead paints), are easily absorbed and quite dangerous. I'm also told that flake white tastes sweet, which increases its danger.

 

The metal and its salt have very different characteristics. This is very common, btw. Metallic sodium is quite dangerous, bursting into flame when it gets wet, but the salt you get when you react it with chlorine (a war poison) sits on nearly every dinner table in the country.

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Frankly the scare about lead in miniatures was always over-hyped.  You would just about have to grind a miniature to dust and snort it to ingest enough from a figure to matter.

 

It's not clear even that would cause a significant health hazard (though I certainly wouldn't recommend it  ^_^ ).

 

The New York attempt at banning lead miniatures involved using a masticating machine to continuously chew lead miniatures, which was not, by itself, enough to reach the maxima allowed for the most at-risk population (children under 2). The bioavailability of metallic lead is very low. Lead salts, OTOH, such as those used to make flake white (the white pigment in many lead paints), are easily absorbed and quite dangerous. I'm also told that flake white tastes sweet, which increases its danger.

 

The metal and its salt have very different characteristics. This is very common, btw. Metallic sodium is quite dangerous, bursting into flame when it gets wet, but the salt you get when you react it with chlorine (a war poison) sits on nearly every dinner table in the country.

 

 

You do know that chlorine is an element and that chlorine gas is not the same as elemental chlorine right? I mean this is off-topic but that's kind of an important distinction. In it's raw form.. yes it's poisonous and caustic.. but it exists outside of military application and was not invented by some military scientists or whatever.

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Just wanted to drop in that the process those in the hobby call "lead rot" is the formation of lead salts from metallic lead.

 

As Doug Sundseth says, lead salts are much more readily absorbed into the body than metallic lead. (But metallic lead can certainly be absorbed by the body. Supporting documentation by the EU Committee for Risk Assessment recommends treating all lead as equally hazardous.)

 

Once lead rot sets in old lead minis become very dangerous.

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Okay, sounds like the metal figures are pretty nasty and can contain 9% lead. If I primed and painted these guys, would they be safe then?

 

Or if I didn't want to do much work, could I just use sealer on them without prime or paint?

First, allow me to be perfectly clear. Our models do not contain 9% lead. (see below)

 

I have removed some posts, which either contained misleading information or had the potential to cause confusion.

 

I'm legally prohibited from sharing our metal mixture, it's one of our proprietary secrets that even If I shared parts of it without permission (like only telling you the precise percentage of Tin and nothing else) I could be divested of my stock and fired within hours. So I cannot give a direct answer to even precisely what metals are in our mixture. I tend to be vague and indicate that it contains Tin and some Antimony and other white metals and leave it at that, because I love my job and don't want to lose it.

 

Now that you know all of that, and understand why I cannot answer this question with the precision of a chemical formula or percentages or a complete list of elements, let me elaborate as much as I can.

 

Our miniatures meet all state and federal regulations for sales within the 50 States and Territories, Canada, and the EU. I am unaware of any stricter regulations that the State of California's regulations, although the Federal limits are very close and very specific. These regulations include lead content, and are very detailed in terms of parts per million and other measurements.

 

Lead is often a sensitive subject, and is treated as a four-letter word by many who only know about children ingesting leaded paint, or leaded gas fumes. Understand that powdered lead and metallic lead are not the same, and even the level of "powder" you are able to make with a file or dremel in your own home are not sufficient to qualify as "powder" the way that it was used in these other products. The level of granularity these products achieved allowed easy absorption by the body, which mistook lead chemically for calcium, and tried to bond it to bones, leading to various health problems. Compound this with both the ready availability of powered lead, in rather large quantities, relative to the children eating it.

 

Now, I discussed this with my boss, and I have permission to share that in compliance with the most recent regulations, our metal mix right now is >96% Tin, and the remaining 3.x% is made of more than 3 other White Metals. I cannot go into more detail than that, but I do hope that this forestalls the fear that we're throwing 9% lead miniatures out into the world. Any lead that might be a part of our mixture is incidental.

 

This next part is significant, and please try not to read between the lines. Federal Guidelines for use of the phrase "lead-free" require lead molecules numbering less than 9 parts per million. That's 0.000009%. So 0.0000091%, or 0.00001% is legally not "lead free". We do not require a level of ore purification on our alloy that routinely meets this standard - so we also cannot legally claim to be lead-free.

 

Having said all of this, I would like you all to understand that what it means when we do not claim to be lead free mix is not the same as "made with 9% lead", or even 3% or whatever. Frankly, Tin is literally the only thing in our mix at greater than 2%!

 

 

 

 

 

I am not a doctor. I am not legally allowed to give medical advice. However, I can urge you if you have health concerns, to get a lead testing kit and test the models, or speak with your doctor about your level of risk. We would love for you and your family to not only feel happy about our company because of our policies, but also to feel safe enjoying our hobby.

 

Thank you all for your time and attention.

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