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Bad bones


ogryn
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Ok

Everywhere and any where are vidoes and blogs about how to fix your bones miniatures if they are bent. Have not found any that talk about what happens wtihin a week of fixing your bones.

Every bones figure i have bought has warped back to how it started before fixing. I boiled and iced my large mini three and it just bends back after a few days.

I also had a stone giant, great metal model. Mine was bent so bad it could not stand. After boiling several times it can stand but just barely .Ended up giving it to the six year to play and paint as a cheap crappy toy that it is.

How do i fix this not gamer or painter friendly rubber.

This happens to Dust figures also. Spent over an hour fixing a five man squad only to have it all bend back after sitting.

 

I do not know how anyone is happy with this cheap garbage material.

Any help?

As is never buying another bone. Waste of money and time .Metal version are less problematic and less time to prep and less frustration.

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 You might want to post pictures, so we can see just what the issue is - most of the time, you just need to boil them for a longer time and then hold them in the ice water longer... For a large mini, you could easily boil it for four or five minutes to get it soft enough to re-pose, and then hold it in the ice water for as long as you can stand it, then leave it in there until the water hits room temperature...

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What Jack said. Pics would be helpful. The only issues I've had with bones not holding shape after boiling, icing were the flippy floppy weapons. Which for the price of the bones, I'm okay with. I think the key is getting them heated all the way through, then cooling them all the way through. Sometimes I've had to hold them in the ice water for quite sometime.

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Sadly, easily bending and warping is a property that Bones shares with many kinds of plastics. And because of this, heat is both your best and worse solution.

 

Though a quick boiling and cooling works for some figures. Others require a far longer heating and cooling period. The larger and thicker a part is, the longer the boil needs to be for the molecule chains to relax back into position. And I'm talking about minutes of boiling, not seconds.

 

The dunk in ice water is a time saver, but in ideal conditions, you would want your miniature to cool down naturally. And even then it should be as slowly as possible.

 

Something to try it so leave the recently boiled mini on a car's dashboard on a sunny day. It'll stay hot and relax for hours. Of course, you need a way to make sure it stays in the right position.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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Also in the case of the stone giant, he leans so far back in is pose that he may be too top heavy to stand well with out a proper base. The original metal version came with a slotted base so the pose never presented a problem there, but it broccoli base of the bones version may not have enough weight on it's own. So basing him is probably the best solution.

Edited by EvilJames
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So far, after 2 KS of Bones and now having 20* Bones minis the only one I have not been able to get into an acceptable pose has been the Jabberwocky.  I even managed to get Deathsleet to stand on her own after about 5-6 minis of a rolling boil and half an hour in the ice water (held for 5 minutes at a time in position then switched hands).  That was a year ago and she still stands today on her little tiny feet!

 

Like others I think it is boil time that is the culprit.  Also - do you live in a high humidity locale?  I avoid trying to reposition Bones during the summer here.

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If you absolutely, positively cannot get a limb to stay in an acceptable pose, what I do is slice it off, drill a pin hole as deep as I can get, add in pinning wire, and reattach the limb. Bend the limb into shape, and the pinning wire should be stiff enough to persuade the limb to stay that way.

 

A little drastic, and it turns the normally flexible Bonesium into something quite rigid, but... it works.

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Pinning is a viable option for Bones, and one that has more options than you might expect. You might not even have to drill.

 

I had a shadow dragon that stubbornly refused to stand up straight, even after repeated boiling. Its front legs kept collapsing, and it would lean heavily to its right.

 

So I warmed it up in water, held each one of its legs straight, and pushed a sewing pin through the integral base, up the leg and into its body. I even did this on the one leg that was supposed to have a crook in the elbow. It took a few false starts, where if the pin got too close to the surface (showing a bulge without breaking the surface), I backed it up partway and pushed it in the direction I wanted.

 

I made sure each pin extended well into the torso, then clipped the head off flush with the surface, and used needle nose pliers to push the remainder further in so it was completely hidden. I was then able to bend the straightened legs back to the positions I wanted them, and the mini has had no leaning problems since.

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Pinning is a viable option for Bones, and one that has more options than you might expect. You might not even have to drill.

 

I had a shadow dragon that stubbornly refused to stand up straight, even after repeated boiling. Its front legs kept collapsing, and it would lean heavily to its right.

 

So I warmed it up in water, held each one of its legs straight, and pushed a sewing pin through the integral base, up the leg and into its body. I even did this on the one leg that was supposed to have a crook in the elbow. It took a few false starts, where if the pin got too close to the surface (showing a bulge without breaking the surface), I backed it up partway and pushed it in the direction I wanted.

 

I made sure each pin extended well into the torso, then clipped the head off flush with the surface, and used needle nose pliers to push the remainder further in so it was completely hidden. I was then able to bend the straightened legs back to the positions I wanted them, and the mini has had no leaning problems since.

 

Even easier if you heat the pins before pushing them into the plastic.  They melt their way in and then cool with the plastic sticking to them like glue.

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So far, after 2 KS of Bones and now having 20* Bones minis the only one I have not been able to get into an acceptable pose has been the Jabberwocky.  I even managed to get Deathsleet to stand on her own after about 5-6 minis of a rolling boil and half an hour in the ice water (held for 5 minutes at a time in position then switched hands).  That was a year ago and she still stands today on her little tiny feet!

 

Like others I think it is boil time that is the culprit.  Also - do you live in a high humidity locale?  I avoid trying to reposition Bones during the summer here.

 

I made the Jabberwock stand by cutting a groove in the left leg and embedding a steel wire under some sculpting putty. Hasn't sagged since. I documented it in the WIP section somewhere.

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