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SirDibblet

Base Coating with Brown Liner

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I have seen a lot of forum members state that they use the brown liner as a base coat for all their Bones minis.  I was just curious how many actually do this?  Do those who do this also use any of the other liner colors for their base coat? If so...why brown liner specifically? 

 

Also, when using the brown liner are you fully base coating as if you were priming or do you do a lighter coating?

 

I like the idea of using the brown liner to sort of "prime" my bones mini's but I just was curious as to how most people go about this.  Thanks for your input!

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I actually use 09214: Black Primer.  However having perused this forum as long as I have, I know a lot of people do prime using brown liner as well.  I believe I have also heard some use gray liner. 

 

FYI the black primer works really well, unless watered down. 

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yup.  actually used up my first bottle of brown liner. (only paint color used up so far) 

I sometimes prime with gray liner instead, esp armored figures. or if nearly monochrome. 

 I did one dragon with violet liner, which was a mistake. 

watered paint does not stick well to bones directly, but works just fine on top of the liner. 

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Brown liner was the color that Buglips first discovered worked especially well as a Bones primer. We have since discovered that all the liners work well for this.

 

I have more blue liner than brown liner, so if I don't care which color I'm using, I'll use blue. But I've used blue, brown, and violet so far, to good effect.

 

You can't thin it too much if you're using a brush, or it will bead and not adhere as well, so I typically lay it down at nearly full strength. But it airbrushes pretty well and you can get a nice thin coat that way.

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I use Brown Liner on Bones because I have long primed metal with white, then a wash of dark brown.  It's the color closest to my other practice.

 

Also, as Doug Sundseth pointed out, Brown Liner was the first color buglips discovered to work so well.  SInce then I've tried Blue and Grey Liners and they work just as well.

 

Brown or sepia is a traditional color for underpaintings, so it seem logical to me.

 

I tried priming Bones with my usual materials, but really -- whatever is in them -- Reaper's liners adhere better than any other paint or primer I've tried.

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I use the liners, but I also use Army Painter spray primers (black/white/zenithal).

 

As Pingo points out, brown gives a nice warm underpainting to work from.

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I use brown liner on bones, and I mix white and black primer together for my metal minis. The white I have is really chalky, but black is too dark. Gray is nice because I can see all the details too. Though I don't thin any of those for metal.... Are we supposed to? o.o

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I use Brown Liner for 'living' creatures & organic material, and Blue Liner for 'undead' and inorganic material.  I also thin it down with acrylic medium so that it has more 'contrast' than the undiluted liners tend to have.

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I don't. I seem to be one of the few people who gets good results with traditional spray primer on Bones.  

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I tried it for a bit, but I personally prefer Badger's airbrush primer that I can never figure out how to say, type, or spell.

 

Coating everything a flat, opaque gray helps me see the detail that I can barely make out on the white, semi-translucent Bones.

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I use brown liner on bones, and I mix white and black primer together for my metal minis. The white I have is really chalky, but black is too dark. Gray is nice because I can see all the details too. Though I don't thin any of those for metal.... Are we supposed to? o.o

 

cough cough

 

09299_g_thumb_1.jpg

 

::):

 

I actually prefer grey primer thou I tend to spray primer mine as I hate brush priming. Of course this is metal minis. Bones I'll do the Brown Liner way (what little Bones I have painted on). Thou I've heard you get pretty good results with Army Painter colored primers.

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I have used Brown, Blue, and Grey liner on Bones minis.

 

I might start using it thinned for the same purpose on metal minis.

 

It is such a hassle to find, create, and setup an area where spraying can safely be done...and also catch the right weather/temperature conditions... OR ...just stay seated at your paint area, grab a big brush, pour some paint out, slarp it on.

 

@ReaperPeeps

HINT=> If Reaper sold liners in big 'buckets' (8, 10, or 12oz. Bottles) I would be done with spray priming forever. <=HINT

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You are, in fact, the only person in the galaxy who doesn't prime his Bones minis.

 

^_^

 

No. Lots of people have painted Bones straight without a base coat of liner. But that tends to work best when you lay down an unthinned base coat. So people who like to mostly work with thinned paints often find it easier to paint over a "primer" coat on Bones.

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