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How fast do you paint?


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No matter what, I always feel like I am painting at a glacially slow pace.

 

It's why I find it helpful to have detailed WIP threads. Then I can see a record what I've done and the changes it's gone through, rather than just feeling "Not done yet ... Not done yet ... Not done yet ... Oh, now it's done."

 

I think I work faster and more efficiently overall when I am painting several minis at once. Unfortunately, this means I am often painting a large number of figures at different stages. I may be finishing a couple a week, on average, but most of them will have been started months before.

 

Last January I finished over forty minis in a fortnight and a bit, but most of them had been languishing in half-finished states for ages.

 

The WIP threads really help all of us  :;):

 

I have a hard time deciding when to call it done.  There comes a point when I think I could do this, or this, but then the impact of doing that seems small (like painting a belt buckle or something) and so that belt buckle never happens and I move on to the next model.  

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My friend calls the stage where you're doing fiddlier and fiddlier bits with smaller and smaller effect "polishing dirt".

 

Many times I have to rely on close friends to tell me I am done with an artwork. ::P:

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My friend calls the stage where you're doing fiddlier and fiddlier bits with smaller and smaller effect "polishing dirt".

 

 

This reminds me of Dr. Faust's Painting Clinic on YouTube. I love his videos. He's an excellent painter in general, and can get really high quality done pretty quickly. But when it comes to skin, he just keep highlighting and highlighting, mixing up, highlighting in a smaller spot, mixing up, highlighting smaller, mixing up, highlighting smaller, mixing up, highlighting smaller,  until finally the last two or three highlights are so faint and insignificant that your computer or TV screen can't even show them to you, and you find yourself wondering if his camera even picked them up at all.

 

There is a limit, after all. A point where it's okay to stop, but sometimes we as painters can't see though it might be slapping us in the face.

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My tabletop is about an hour or two. But I usually don't do a very good job cleaning the flash (because that takes me the most time to do nicely) and that is without shading, weathering, primer coat or transitions. I typically only do a little bit of a wash and call it a day.

 

My display is about six per reasonably un-articulated standard sized humanoid model or 1 inch monster. 8 if I decided to do a filter, weathering or pin wash (never happens).

 

That being said. I have a lot of models painted. But I also have about 50 that are half done.

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After painting while on the Google Hangouts, I may have to re-evaluate my painting speed, from average to abysmally slow.

 

In my defense, I was painting a KS1 Bones Werner Klocke model (Elquin Bones, Elquin metal). So as I painted, new ill-defined details kept appearing.

 

What was that comment about polishing dirt?

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Agreed, Elquin is a fantastic model and I can see why Reaperbryan insisted he be available as Bones. Unfortunately, the transition just didn't work out very well... I'm hoping that he might get the "new plastic" treatment (into the off-gray, slightly harder variation) and his details may become clearer.

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Elquin is thus far my least favorite Bones1 model. I literally threw him across the room. Only time I've done that.

And being made of Bonesium, he survived!

 

How dastardly of him. Especially when you consider he's an anthropomorphized inanimate object.

 

If it weren't for the metal model, there's a lot small details that would've left me confused to this day.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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Elquin is thus far my least favorite Bones1 model. I literally threw him across the room. Only time I've done that.

And being made of Bonesium, he survived!

 

How dastardly of him. Especially when you consider he's an anthropomorphized inanimate object.

 

If it weren't for the metal model, there's a lot small details that would've left me confused to this day.

 

What I was most confused about the bones version was why does he have a fish at his belt?

I guess it was the style of the times. #simpsons

I dutifully painted it as a fish, including eyes.  

 

I think I also painted his bandoleer of eggs. 

Edited by Evilhalfling
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Elquin is thus far my least favorite Bones1 model. I literally threw him across the room. Only time I've done that.

And being made of Bonesium, he survived!

 

How dastardly of him. Especially when you consider he's an anthropomorphized inanimate object.

 

If it weren't for the metal model, there's a lot small details that would've left me confused to this day.

 

What I was most confused about the bones version was why does he have a fish at his belt?

I guess it was the style of the times. #simpsons

I dutifully painted it as a fish, including eyes.  

 

I think I also painted his bandoleer of eggs. 

 

well you don't want to get hungry while adventuring. He also has a rasher of bacon secreted away somewhere.

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