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althai

60022: Karzoug, Runelord - speedpainted, with dramatic lighting effect

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In the words of the great CashWiley, "I hate you."

 

Translation "Holy ELF!!! I wish I could paint that we'll period let alone 75 min!"

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Very very cool!

 

If it wasn't a speed paint, I'd offer a critique on the OSL, but it's still awesome.

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In the words of the great CashWiley, "I hate you."

 

Translation "Holy ELF!!! I wish I could paint that we'll period let alone 75 min!"

 

Totally seconded. Excellent work, it is stunningly beautiful.

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Thanks for the kind words, all!

 

Very very cool!

 

If it wasn't a speed paint, I'd offer a critique on the OSL, but it's still awesome.

Please share anyways, I'd like to know what it is. I'm not likely to adjust this particular mini (as it was a speedpaint), but it may be helpful for the next time I do OSL.

Edited by althai

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Thanks for the kind words, all!

 

 

Very very cool!

 

If it wasn't a speed paint, I'd offer a critique on the OSL, but it's still awesome.

Please share anyways, I'd like to know what it is. I'm not likely to adjust this particular mini (as it was a speedpaint), but it may be helpful for the next time I do OSL.

K, the OSL looks too "bright" along his side and almost the same brightness as closer to the light source. You've got light on his boots which are further away from the source than the clothing to the left, yet the clothing to the left doesn't seem to have any light on it. His bottom right boot is what grabbed my attention the most here as it looks like it should (from pic angles) be shrouded in shadow and have no chance of that much light hitting it.

 

All this aside, it's really a great piece!

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K, the OSL looks too "bright" along his side and almost the same brightness as closer to the light source. You've got light on his boots which are further away from the source than the clothing to the left, yet the clothing to the left doesn't seem to have any light on it. His bottom right boot is what grabbed my attention the most here as it looks like it should (from pic angles) be shrouded in shadow and have no chance of that much light hitting it.

Thanks, I took another look at the miniature you're definitely right about about whether the light could reach his shoes. When painting OSL (or any lighting effect actually), I like to actually look at the miniature from the direction of the light source, figure out what I can see, and use that as a guide for where to paint lights and shadows. Holding a miniature up under a light is also really useful for this. A good example is the study I did when I painted abalam [links to articles on my blog]. I didn't quite have time for that during a speedpaint. But the reminder is good because ideally I'd be better at getting things right without needing to find lights to create a reference photo. ;) 

 

How do you do that in 75 minutes??? Give me your secrets! GIVE THEM TO ME!

No secrets. But here are some tips.

1) You can't get smooth blends or fine detail when speedpainting anyways, so just don't worry about it. Go for overall impact instead. This means thinking about large contrast and overall lighting situation. It's a lot like tabletop painting - your goal is to gave good impact from a couple feet away, not to stand up to close examination.

2) Highlight placement. If you put your highlights in the right places, they will look right even if the blending is not very smooth. A good example of this is the green color transitions on the arms, which are actually quite abrupt, but look "right" that way. The highlights on the red bits are like this as well. Not that my placement is perfect, as Nerd's critique shows!

3) Lining edges, both bright lines where they catch light and darklining between objects. This is where you fix mistakes you make while speedpainting and make everything look clean and neat, and have details that are visible from a distance. Since this is a speedpaint, I didn't worry about lining everything, just the most important areas, like the face, chest, and weapon.

4) I've been painting long enough to have developed good brush control and knowledge of how paint moves, so I make fewer mistakes that I need to go back and fix, which helps speed things up. I still make them though; that's what tip 3 is for!

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