Jump to content

Liquitex ratios


Rich711
 Share

Recommended Posts

I started painting with GW paints and have switched to all reaper. I love the triads but feel my fine highlighting suffers because of how thick reaper paint is and how I can't just add water like I did in the past with GW paints.  I bought some Liquitex and wanted to know if anyone with experience with it could recommend a good water to liquitex ratio and then a Reaper paint to liquitex mix ratio.  I only use brushes, no sprayers and I am not really interested in buying additional products to add to the mix.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 16
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

In my experience, the MSP triads flow well out of the bottle and can be thinned with water without much hassle (to what extent may depend on the individual shade).  How much water are you using?  If I want to thin the pigment, I just add as much Liquitex Matte Medium as I need to reach the desired effect, but at this point, I'm probably mixing a wash or glaze, rather than highlighting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All reaper paints can be thinned with water...

(Use distilled water if you can get it. PH neutral, no funny minerals or additives)

 

The exception is generally the metallics, but even they can take a little water without getting uneven. 

 

I use the Reaper 09300 Wash Medium or Vallejo Thinner when water alone doesn't work right.

 

Mixing in Liquitex paints...

Yeah, right. Large pigments, a different base formulated for it. 

Not that there's anything inherently wrong with Liquitex paints. They're just not created with miniature painting in mind. 

(Yeah, I have a big box of Liquitex and other brands of 'tube paints'. They have their uses. )

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reaper paints should be able to be diluted with water just fine.  For new bottles, I usually do a 3:1 paint:water ratio.  This changes as the bottle ages and the liquid evaporates.

 

I keep a 1:10 mix of flow aid:water around for general diluting, but Reaper's paints already have some flow aid added. 

 

I have some airbrush thinner for the metallics (someone suggested this, and it seems to work well).

 

Hard and fast ratios are tough to come by, because my old paints have a different consistency from the paints I bought last week.  It's more about knowing what consistency you should have rather than a mathematical formula (i.e. it is more art than science). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry thought Liquitex was the name, It's called Liquitex Professional Flow-Aid.  I have found reaper paints are very hard to work with when I add water, they get way too runny and the color seems to become uneven.  I will try 3-1 paint-water and 10-1 Flow-aid.  I saw someone else say 5-1.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reaper msp is very fluid to begin with. Add water little by little and test the consistency on your thumbnail. It's easy to gauge opacity this way. Flow aid is one part per 10 - 25 parts water and unnecessary for normal base coat and layering. YMMV.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want thinner paint and don't want the consistancy to change, use some acrylic glazing medium. It is basically paint without pigment. I used it most recently to thin metallic paint that I wanted a very thin, transparent layer of. I end up using water as well, but just a bit of the glazing medium will help the paint stay suspended and not act like a wash.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a stupid question but are you using a wet palette?  A long time ago I would use a porcelain palette to mix and thin paint but when I switched to a wet palette thinning the paint became much more consistent.  

I used to use a wet palette but found reaper paints behaved weird even with as little water as sits on a wet palette, so I went back to one of those plastic wheel palettes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich711, thus far all the things you've described don't seem to make sense given my experience with Reaper's paints.  It would be great if you could post pictures, or a link to pictures, to show some of the effects you've talked about.

 

I've been using Reaper's paints for a long time, starting with the Master Series.  There may be times the paint separates after it has sat for a long time, and it may dry out a bit (making it hard to get out of the bottle), but the things you've described have, quite literally, never happened to me (and, I would be willing to bet, others on this forum).  The worst offenders seem to be the metallics, but again there's nothing approaching what you've described.  In the worst case, where the paint has dried some, I can pop the lid off, scoop out a small amount of gummy paint, and dilute it with water/medium and it's fine.

 

I didn't use many from the Pro Paints line; those were in a short squat bottle with a screw-off lid.  Although they were decent paints, they didn't work well with the way I paint.  It seems to me (although I could be mistaken) that because of the different formulation, those didn't do well with extreme dilution. I could be wrong; it's been a long time since I've used them.

 

As I write this, I realize there could be one other thing that causes your paints to act wonky.  If they've been frozen, that is a paint-killer.  So, if you got them mail-ordered during January and they sat on your doorstep for a while, or something similar.  Freezing the paint causes all sorts of interactions of the chemicals that will pretty much make the paint worthless.  Could that have happened?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...