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So! I haven't painted as much as I've wanted to this summer, sadly. I planned to do more, but it just got away from me amid other things. I like how Deenah came out for the most part, but I'm not thrilled with her hair or skin. I'm not sure what to do to make blonde hair look good. Use light browns for a shadow? And then human skin continues to be a hit or miss experience for me. I tried to use the Rosy Skin triad, but I don't know if my skill is just too poor to showcase the difference in tint/shade between the triad colors, or if they need a little help to get them to pop against each other a bit more.

 

Or maybe it's fine. I don't know.

 

Edit: reshot the pics.

 

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Edited by sirgourls
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Looks good.

 

I always start my blonde haired figures out with a light brown color as the base and work up to brighter and brighter colors from there, but still leaving the shadows tinted brown. As for flesh tones, you could always try using glazes to add to the shadows. What I'd probably do with her is a very thin glaze of Reaper's Clear Magenta and lightly (very lightly) tint the areas under cheek bones and under the chin and very top of hairline. It'll add depth and color to the rosy skin triad. I don't personally use all parts of a triad when I do my skin tones, i don't get caught up in the "flesh" colors as all the paints can be used to create flesh colors and then you don't limit yourself to 3 shades and allow yourself to create more contrast.

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I like her..

 

And I agree with the Barbarian about flesh tones.

Glazing and Washes can help a lot.

 

And using different tones like reds , purples or even blues can help a lot.

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Thanks! I may try that. I've never done any glazing before. Gotta learn sometime!

No problem!

 

The key, absolute key, with glazing is to make sure it's very thin, which is why those Reaper Clears work so well. Then you take your damp brush, dip it into the paint and get about 90% of it off on a sponge or microfiber towel or coffee filter (something that doesn't have any fibers). You then tint the areas gently with this now dampened almost water color on your brush, you do NOT want it to pool at all. It may take you 2, 3, or more passes to tint it to where you want it. It's a bit slower, but it creates some very subtle effects. 

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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I don't have any of the clears, but I'll make a note to pick some up. So I dip a damp brush into unthinned paint and then wipe? Or do I thin the paint first? I'm a big ol' glaze newbie.

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thin the paint like crazy.  to the point it is basically colored water or koolaid consistency.    then dip in the brush and touch the paper towel and let most of the water get absorbed.  then touch the mini.

 

 

Spelling mistake fixed!

Edited by robinh
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thin the paint like crazy. to the point it is basically colored water or koolaid consistency. then dip in the brush and touch the paper towel and let most of the water get absorbed. thne touch the mini.

This.

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