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Practical Uses of Miniature Painting


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Awesome story!

 

I don't have anything close to that but I have been able to use some of the skills from my miniatures and boardgame hobby to impress the kids.  Making the kids happy counts as practical right?  ::D:

 

In one case, I was able to use the hot water technique, which I learned due to the hobby, to fix some cheap plastic soldiers that were badly bent out of shape.  The wife and kids were highly impressed with this simple trick as they were getting ready to take another trip to the shopping mall to get a refund on the bucket of toy soldiers.

 

In another case, I made some small card boxes to hold collectible football player cards that my kids were collecting.  Previously, they had been using a rubber band to keep the cards together so they loved getting a small box with a picture of their favourite player on the front.

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I had a DJ ask me to paint the indicator marks on some little knobs he had on his music-thingy.  They were black knobs with a black indentation, so he couldn't see them, but needed to know where they were in relation to each other.  They might have been some sort of equalizer-thing. 

 

I had a coworker ask me about how to paint a license plate holder on his wife's car - things like how to keep the paint on, where to find weird colors, etc.  Primer! Always primer . . . .

 

I've pinned a couple of my sons' toys, like a Star Wars figure and the shield on a Captain America motorcycle (Lowes had a Build-and-Grow clinic last summer that had five Avengers vehicles).

 

My wife has asked me to help make several of her Christmas-Craft ideas come to life since I have lots of glue, knives, and patience.

 

I once used my X-acto knife to cut and remove some stiches.  I don't know if that qualifies, but I was sitting at my painting table when I did it.

 

I've used color theory a couple times, the latest being shingles for our roof ("No, there's too much red between the bricks and those shingles, we should go with this nice gray color to give the roof a little contrast").

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I can't think of much:

 

Papercraft My Little Ponies for my daughter.

 

Painting custom beer pong tables back when I was in college. 

 

"Brush control" comes in handy for using tweezers/exacto blades in medical uses like remocing cactus thorns (the few left behind after the white glue trick when my toddler got too curious).

 

Color theory might be helping in my wardrobe choices. My wife doesn't seem to complain about my outfits as much, lol.

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Quick note: Gloss is generally more durable than matt, and probably wouldn't look bad on that ring. On which, btw, an excellent job.

 

So let's see: Christmas ornament repair (both pinning/gluing and repainting), sculpture repair (same; my wife runs art shows). Choosing mat colors for framed art (please keep artists away from this, btw, they* seem to see it as a distasteful chore unworthy of thought, and some of the colors just kill the art). Color theory and graphic design as used in miniatures work synergize pretty well with the same things in my professional photo work.

 

* Broad generalization that is obviously unfair to some artists, but I've hung many art shows and it's really pretty true.

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Years and years and years ago my sister gave me a dragon/castle/fantasy bank as a present.

Usually I had it filled with candy and chocolates.

The lid got open a lot.

Somehow one of the dragons horns became damaged. One broke off and was lost.

I used green stuff to sculpt a replacement horn and to fix up the others. Repainted them with my mini paint to match the rest of the sculpt.

It came out pretty good. I was pleased.

Been thinking maybe filling it with dice instead of candies. ::):

 

FullSizeRender_zpsfni62zvd.jpg

 

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Not painting per se, but I used my Optivisor and a couple of sets of tweezers to untangle my Mother in Laws jewelry chain one time.  Also I used a chunk of sprue and JB Weld to put new perches on a bird feeder that had gotten banged up.  My wife was impressed with that one!  :)

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Painted an old bike badge from England. My BIL wanted me to change the cigar box Indian on his carnival ride, into a pirate. Lots of carving, putty, and paint on that. 

I've also repaired rings, hair barrettes and other piece of jewelry for my wife and daughter. I'm sure there's been other things as well, but can't remember them. 

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Yup most of those things mentioned, lots of toy repairs, some jewelry...

Visor, x acto knife and tweezers for splinter removal...

I would say that pinning is the most used hobby skill used in my house.

But all the little tools get used for things other than hobbying as well.

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