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Kendal
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A recap of the last game I played at the café. Instead of the regular hack and slash, the DM went with a side quest story inspired from fairy tales that barely involved any combat.

 

After some debate about what to do about those books of atrocious evil we found last time (formerly belonging to a lich), the tiefling warlock kept feeling a call that drew her north. P.S. The players know she's been infected with lycanthropy by the wererats, but no PC does.

 

So while walking north, we stumble on an inn (with no roads leading to it) with only an elderly woman holding shop, and a mule tied outside. She offers off lodging, food, baths, somehow everything we wanted. Those who ate the homemade cookies turned into mules during the night (kept their minds), and the old lady had magical figurines that turned into a a farmer and mule to plow the fields. For years she was maintaining this enchanted inn, turning people into mules and selling them off. One mule kick to the head later, she was dead. The transformed PCs remained mules. Moments later, the fey that gave her this "gift" showed up and we were trapped with it until we entertained it sufficiently. Eventually he let us go and changed us back, but six months went by.

 

So we continue north until until we find the hill in tiefling's vision. It has standing stones on top, and a magical ward that forced some of the PCs to suddenly reappear at the bottom of the hill several times. By the evening, the tiefling convinced us to do a ritual to summon a... eyeless beast of many eyes, with the evil books. The creature (a blind variant beholder) appears and turns out to be the warlock's patron. It took the pair of evil books and returned another book to the tiefling (it became her expanded spellbook). The creature asked us if we wanted something else. The group's brawler threw in a bone and folding chair (don't ask) and got a club size fang in exchange. I threw in an empty bag of stale muffins and got a mutated version of my childhood pet back (essentially got a free familiar out of it).

 

I'm skipping over a lot of the silliness that accompanies our games. Using muffins from the 12yr old cleric as barter. How we kept stealing the books of evil from each other. How the brawler and my halfling sorcerer didn't really mind becoming mules. I became a teacup mule, so I was adorable and raided the kitchen. The fey turned the cleric into a footstool when he attacked him. Some gratuitous murder (elderly woman was not evil; the original mule was a transformed blacksmith that got killed; one of the figurines got thrown in the fireplace and technically was alive and died).

 

All in all, the DM adapted a Chinese fairy tale with Irish fey (known to be broccolis). It was a nice change of not risking dying in combat all the time and perfect for drop in adventures.

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Well, that doesn't exactly answer my question, but it does make me want to change the Forgemother's name to Fire Mother. It fits the image I had envisioned of her more. She's going to be their war god and protector, while the Forge Father will be who is revered for life, death, and raising children.

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Odd request but does anyone know where I can find pictures of the two-sided poster map from the 3.5e Dungeon Master's Guide?

 

One of the guys who'll play in my workplace one-shot will bring it for us to use for combat encounters. I'd like to have its dimensions handy (and the room layout of the dungeon-ed side) to prep the encounters accordingly.

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On 1/18/2018 at 12:09 PM, BlazingTornado said:

Odd request but does anyone know where I can find pictures of the two-sided poster map from the 3.5e Dungeon Master's Guide?

 

 It's 28 x 19 squares, colored dungeon on one side,  same size black and white grid of the same floor tiles minus the walls on the other... Overall size about 30 x 21 inches or so.  It's just a quick picture I snapped of it (at a bit of an angle)...

 

Spoiler

3.5DMGmap.thumb.JPG.c02613dcdfc615d0cf37c791d747a71c.JPG

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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You know, I've always found it funny that in D&D you always find a pantheon that's worshipped by everybody. You know, the kind of pantheon where everyone of every race knows who Moradin is, and even though it's mostly dwarves that worship him everyone, even the orcs, revere him as a god. You never really get the more realistic stuff where different cultures have entirely different pantheons. In trying to do it that way for my own homebrewing setting, I think I'm figuring out why. It's just so much easier to create a handful of gods and say "these are who are available, everyone knows who they are, pick one."

 

But I can't really do that, because in my world the gods are "dead." And they have been for a couple millenia. So you don't have actual divine beings interfering in the world, letting everyone know who they are, so different religions with different pantheons have sprung up to full the void.

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Ever been kind of isappointed because the DRAGON broke off the battle?

 

And apologized, kind of?

 

Running battle, the dragon would fight, breathe a twisting miasma of shadows, then fly off, only to engage again when he could BREATHE again.

 

Then we destroyed the thing that was keeping him bound.

 

He flew off, did a barrel roll, landed, and then Thanked us.

 

Told us he was leaving, wasn't coming back, and if we wanted to get his treasure, we could KEEP it!

 

He wanted to leave so badly that even his HOARD wasn't worth sticking around to get.

 

Lots of undead, and he hit us three or four times while we were already engaged.

 

One more repetition of that would have left a bunch of us dead.

 

Jon was the one with the LEAST damage for a change.

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2 hours ago, Unruly said:

You know, I've always found it funny that in D&D you always find a pantheon that's worshipped by everybody. You know, the kind of pantheon where everyone of every race knows who Moradin is, and even though it's mostly dwarves that worship him everyone, even the orcs, revere him as a god. You never really get the more realistic stuff where different cultures have entirely different pantheons. In trying to do it that way for my own homebrewing setting, I think I'm figuring out why. It's just so much easier to create a handful of gods and say "these are who are available, everyone knows who they are, pick one."

 

Probably has to do with that whole "the gods demonstratably prove they exist" thing that's a thing in D&D, unlike here where it *rest of post expunged for discussing real-world religious topics*

3 hours ago, Mad Jack said:

 

 It's 28 x 19 squares, colored dungeon on one side,  same size black and white grid of the same floor tiles minus the walls on the other... Overall size about 30 x 21 inches or so.  It's just a quick picture I snapped of it (at a bit of an angle)...

 

  Reveal hidden contents

3.5DMGmap.thumb.JPG.c02613dcdfc615d0cf37c791d747a71c.JPG

 

You, sir, are awesome.
I don't need a perfect flat thing so I can copy it and use it in VTT or print it out myself, I just needed to have a good visual of the room layout.

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5 minutes ago, BlazingTornado said:

 

You, sir, are awesome.
 

 

 Well, yeah.

 

 

(Oh, and I'm also a guy who happens to use the same chair for both his puter desk and hobby table, and so only needed to turn around, grab the book and camera, and take a picture.)

 

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2 hours ago, BlazingTornado said:

Probably has to do with that whole "the gods demonstratably prove they exist" thing that's a thing in D&D, unlike here where it *rest of post expunged for discussing real-world religious topics*

 

Oh, I guarantee it has to do with that. But it still kind of sucks that they've never really done it in a published setting that I know of. Of all my religions, I think I'm going to have the dwarves be the ones who managed to keep their faith closest to what it was originally after the gods went silent. After all, I've only given them 4 gods, and 2 of them are both worshipped singularly and are dwarves who were raised to godhood by one of the others.

 

I'm running into a few issues with adapting Thelema to my game for the humans. I think it's because I'm basing it solely on what I can read about it on Wikipedia, since I don't really feel like buying Crowley's books and reading them myself. I may just revert it to the Egyptian gods, which were the root of most of the Thelemic gods anyway, because they have more readily available info. That, and it's much easier to work off of the Greeks/Romans, the Norse, and the Egyptian gods to build pantheons that are similar, so they can show a common root, but different enough that it may cause conflict between cultures. Then, if the gods of my campaign do come back, the religions will be more along the lines of different denominations that just use different names for the varying gods. Sort of like what happened with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. There's enough in common that it's obvious they share the same root, but so many changes have been made over the years between them that followers of one have varying degrees of distaste for the others.

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