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Large Miniatures how to paint their Banners, Shields and Heraldry


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So lately I love to paint busts, and larger miniatures.

 

Now I have been drooling over several large scale miniatures, 54 to 200mm...

 

I looked at sites who sell those, like Pegaso, Andrea, El Greeco etc etc..

And what bothers me a bit but also intrigues me is the extraordinary painting on some of those.

 

I especially mean things like the shields on Greek Hoplites, the Barding and Banners of Medieval Knights.

Some of these look like masterpaintings on a mini.

 

So my question.

 

Are these superb painters? Or is there a trick I could learn?

Are there templates being used and how do you use those?

 

Is this in anyway possible for an avarage painter to achieve something like that?

And with a BRUSH!

I don't own ( never will I touch..) an airbrush..

 

I know there are a few painters on this forum who are able to pull this off.

So care to share some secrets?

 

Some examples of what I'm talking about I got these from the internet, there are many more beautiful examples like this.

 

I'm no Michelangelo, but I really would try to paint a shield like that on a larger mini.

So I'm curious if there are any step by steps, tricks, and such available.

 

F38_16_14_zpslyak6j6y.jpg

 

13de06848ed29d7a4ae4abeece180940_zpszzy0

 

p1161865_zpser4jitwo.jpg

Edited by Xherman1964
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another way to think of those patterns is to break them down into simpler patterns and shapes and paint those, then add all the fancy bits.  Two good people to ask about this at reapercon are Marike R

Lots of good advice already.  And I see someone linked to the tutorial I wrote, so no need to reshare that.   Before you try doing the freehand design on the figure, I recommend drawing it out on pa

Abstraction (breaking it down into simpler shapes) is a great tip. When I did the Patriots logo for Josh's hoodie, I did a bunch of tests on paper, painting each one smaller and smaller, reducing the

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Most freehand depends a lot on the person's artistic ability I've found. Doesn't that mean you can't learn but it takes time. I'm terrible at freehand I don't consider myself an artist. However, to create convincing wood texture is not hard technically and relies on light and shadow. But it's mostly just lines and washes placed correctly. Add in some simple free hand designs, like a Chevron and you will have a great looking shield. Nmm isn't technically hard, brush stroke wise but correct placement of highlights and flawless blending will elevate it. Glazing is simple, thin the paint apply it over where you want and wait. But doing it in the right spot in the right consistency is all experience and practice.

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Shields are a good place for freehand as they tend to be large relatively flat surfaces.  If you haven't already seen it, here is a good starting tutorial.

 

https://powellminipainting.blogspot.com/p/freehand-designs.html

 

Thx! Very helpful!

 

I've done some freehands on 28mm minis, but this is a whole new level.

Basically I'm trying to learn the techniques behind this.

 

I saw some nice things on the internet too.

 

Now to figure out how to transfer a nice drawing onto a smaller scale shield..

Edited by Xherman1964
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another way to think of those patterns is to break them down into simpler patterns and shapes and paint those, then add all the fancy bits.  Two good people to ask about this at reapercon are Marike Reimer and Jessica Rich.  They both teach classes on how to break down patterns and simplify them so it doesn't seem overwhelming.

 

One way to think of the use of a painting as freehand on a shield is to take a printed photo of the painting and draw lines across it in a grid.  That way you can essentially transfer the "pattern" to the new surface by following your grid.  Things are always less intimidating when you think about them stepwise.  If it helps, I have two semi step by steps on patterns I did:

 

skulls  about halfway down the page

shield  towards the bottom

 

I like freehand, so if I can be more helpful, let me know!

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#1 and #3 are not out of most painters' leagues as far as learning, #2 is clearly trained in fine arts, and will be a stretch to replicate for someone looking to rely on tricks or techniques, there's just some damn good painting in there...

Not that 1 and 3 are bad, but the freehand in those is kind of stream of thought for the background, and just about good brush control. The actual art doesn't appear to be anything special on those two IMO.

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another way to think of those patterns is to break them down into simpler patterns and shapes and paint those, then add all the fancy bits.  Two good people to ask about this at reapercon are Marike Reimer and Jessica Rich.  They both teach classes on how to break down patterns and simplify them so it doesn't seem overwhelming.

 

One way to think of the use of a painting as freehand on a shield is to take a printed photo of the painting and draw lines across it in a grid.  That way you can essentially transfer the "pattern" to the new surface by following your grid.  Things are always less intimidating when you think about them stepwise.  If it helps, I have two semi step by steps on patterns I did:

 

skulls  about halfway down the page

shield  towards the bottom

 

I like freehand, so if I can be more helpful, let me know!

 

Thx!!!

 

I like this!!!

 

And I'm Dutch..I won't be coming to reapercon :down:

 

Thing is..I can draw some stuff, but never learned real art...

One of my struggles is recreating a picture in a smaller scale.

 

Your step by step with that shield is really really helpful!!!

Edited by Xherman1964
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sadness!

If there's something specific you want to try, let me know.  I can help you simplify the pattern and help with a step by step.  I'm off this weekend, so happy to throw together some stuff!

 

Thx!!!

 

I will try some stuff on paper. See how that turns out.

 

See? I never thought about breaking down the patterns.

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You could cheat...

Decalpaper and a good colour printer...

It's not easy to cheat at 28mm scale. Especially if you don't have a relatively flat surface. It's particularly frustrating to maintain straight lines in folds of cloth.

 

#1 and #3 are not out of most painters' leagues as far as learning, #2 is clearly trained in fine arts, and will be a stretch to replicate for someone looking to rely on tricks or techniques, there's just some damn good painting in there...

Not that 1 and 3 are bad, but the freehand in those is kind of stream of thought for the background, and just about good brush control. The actual art doesn't appear to be anything special on those two IMO.

I thought the same thing. Given enough time, I can see myself replicate #1 and #3.

 

#2 looks far larger than a 28mm scale model, so it's a different game to paint on that scale.

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As for the decals.

 

If I only wanted an army to play with I would.

 

But I paint for display and the fun of learning to improve.

So I really want to try bigger and more elaborate freehands.

 

I have done some stuff in the past, but I want to improve and paint freehands on larger scale miniatures.

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/67219-bones-dumpster-by-xherman1964/

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/60449-02967-alastriel-elf-sorceress/

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/60490-77052-aina-female-valkyrie-bones/?hl=aina

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another way to think of those patterns is to break them down into simpler patterns and shapes and paint those, then add all the fancy bits.  Two good people to ask about this at reapercon are Marike Reimer and Jessica Rich.  They both teach classes on how to break down patterns and simplify them so it doesn't seem overwhelming.

This, completely. Rather than start with some complex pattern, just start with doodles. I was lucky enough to get some coaching from Jessica on my freehand for Gwen's cloak, WIP starts here: https://cashwiley.com/2015/02/08/gwen-wip-5/

 

Look over that post and the two WIP posts after that (5, 5.5 and 6) to get a feel for my method. I just started with a couple colors on the palette and did little swirly doodles and dots. Some came out great, some are just there for filler detail. Then I went in and added some highlights, which was pretty easy (just adding dots to existing patterns to bring out the tops of the folds of cloth). And Gwen is a really tiny mini, you could do it a lot easier on a big mini!

 

I see you've already looked at some of Powell's work, here's another great lesson from that very talented guy: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/63738-northumbrian/?p=1209903

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