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Genghis_Sean

What outdoor temp needed to spray prime?

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I've got some Army Painter spray primer and I need to prime a couple figures, but the temperature has plunged here in Indiana.  It was 41 this morning, though I think it's up to 51 now.  Is that warm enough to prime?

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 That might be a little bit low. However, humidity has a lot more to do with borking up spraying things with primer and/or sealer than temperature (except for extreme temps in either direction)...

 

I'd try a test piece. Spray one of them. If possible, spray it outside and then immediately bring it indoors and set it someplace where the residual smell from the primer won't be an issue, such as a garage, etc.

 

Chances are good it won't be an issue... And if it is, you should be able to tell within half an hour or so.

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That might be a little bit low. However, humidity has a lot more to do with borking up spraying things with primer and/or sealer than temperature (except for extreme temps in either direction)...

 

I'd try a test piece. Spray one of them. If possible, spray it outside and then immediately bring it indoors and set it someplace where the residual smell from the primer won't be an issue, such as a garage, etc.

 

Chances are good it won't be an issue... And if it is, you should be able to tell within half an hour or so.

Spot on.

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Jen Haley once did a demo spraying in the snow.  The message was if the mini is warm, the spray can is warm, and you bring everything back in to where it is warm after, the cold air temperature isn't such a big deal.

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 It's also good to have a bottle of brush-on to touch up any spots the spray might have missed, either when there's not enough bare spots to justify another coat of spray or when the missed spot is somewhere difficult for the spray to hit like up under a cloak or something. Plus, there's always the chance that you might scuff the primer during painting and need to touch it up.

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What do the instructions on the spray can say?  I don't have Army painter, but my can of Tamiya primer says on the first line of the instructions "Not recommended for use below 50° F or during high humidity".

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You ought to be ok at 50F, but test it on something.  I think humidity is more of a factor than temp.  

 

FWIW I spray prime, gloss coat and Dulcote in my garage at 50F during the winter with no issues.  I keep the cans in the warm part of the house.

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   I've sprayed down to temps in the 40's, but like others have said, it's always with a can and minis that came straight from a warm basement, and then brought everything back in immediately afterwards.  Also, don't spray from too far away, so the paint drops don't have a chance to cool down in the air too much.

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Can should have the best instructions.  I know my Duplicolor spray has pretty wide tolerances.  And yes - humidity is probably more important.

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I'll echo that humidity is the more important factor than temp. Higher humidities being more difficult to deal with.

 

I have successfully sprayed in Pittsburgh winter. Typically I will fill a bowl with hot water from the tap, then put my (shaken) spray can in a Ziploc, which then floats in the warm water. I let it stay there until I'm ready to go outside, at which point I shake again until that rattle is as smooth as possible, just before walking out the door.

 

For single figures, though, I almost always brush prime with slightly-thinned Liquitex gesso. Spraying is only for very large jobs, either big dragons or multi-fig units.

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Make sure you watch the Army Painter color primer video. The color primer instructions are *different* than hardware store primer. 

 

Don't forget the Quickshade Inks! Ink after priming will show off the details. Here's Leather primer followed by Strong Tone Quickshade Ink (brown). Obviously, it still needs to be painted, but it's a great head start.

 

pic3234524_md.jpg

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I've sprayed minis in the Norwegian winter, too. It's rarely below -15 degrees (celsius) on my glassed-in porch, but I've never had a problem using black or white spray cans.

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Here's what you do with spray primer in the cold weather:
Take both figure and spray paint and get them to room temperature (my spray cans live in the garage which gets quite cold).
Once everything is room temp, shake the can and take everything outside. Spray immediately. Then return everything back to the house and let it dry.

 

This works fine for me in Colorado as long as it's not actively snowing.

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