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Wet Pallet Issues

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I bought a wet pallet.  Standard Masterson Sta-Wet.  Turns out the tray that the sponge sits in is bowed up so the tray has a convex shape and all the paint runs toward the outside of the pallet.

 

Has anyone else experienced this?  Is there anything I can do to fix it and flatten it out somehow?

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Try heating it.  Use a hair dryer first (I don't think a hair dryer will be hot enough and you will have to use a heat gun, but that is just my opinion).  Heat the back side of the palette until it just becomes pliable and then lay it on a flat surface (counter top, table etc..) and put a heavy book/weight in the tray to keep it flat while the plastic cools.   The key is to heat only the the back side, targeting the trouble area to take the warp out of it.  

 

Alternatively, try returning it to wherever you bought it from and see if they will exchange it for a good one.  You could also try contacting Masterson directly and see if they will replace it.  Masterson contact Info:

 

General Inquires for Consumers, Retailers and Distributors
Telephone: 1-602-263-6017 or 1-800-965-2675
Facsimile: 1-602-263-7402
e-mail: info@mastersonart.com

Mailing address:
Masterson Art Products Inc.
P.O. Box 11301
Phoenix, Arizona, USA 85017

Edited by Bloodhowl
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Looks like I may need to invest in a heat gun.

 

They seem to be all over the board in both wattage and price.  I like the 1500W model from Harbor Freight, but the temperature range looks a bit high.  Any recommendations?

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I have a 1500 watt dual temp gun from Harbor Freight.  The "Low" setting should be plenty of heat for what you need. You can sort of further regulate the temp by holding the gun further away from the piece than you think you need and moving it back and forth over the area (vs. holding it in one spot). Gradually move it closer if it isn't getting the plastic hot enough to reshape. 

 

Sorry I didn't think of this earlier but you might also be able to boil the palette in water (like we do for reshaping warped Bones minis) if you have a pot big enough to hold the palette.  You could also try holding it over the stove burner to soften the plastic. Personally, I wouldn't feel I would have enough control of where the heat was being applied like I do with a heat gun and would be worried of heating too large an area all at once. 

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1.jpg
DISCLAIMER: I have never tried this.
 
Here's how I'd do it:
 
- Get an oven-safe stoneware or Pyrex glass dish, larger and deeper than the palette.
- Place palette in dish and weigh it down so it's perfectly flat (rocks, a brick, metal minis, whatever).
- Fill dish and palette with water. Enough to completely cover palette, but not so much as it spills over dish as it boils.
- Place in oven (uncovered) and bring to a boil. Since the palette is thin material, it doesn't need to boil more than a couple of minutes. If you're worried about melting the plastic, set the oven at no more than 250F (melting point should be about 266F or 130C, but being covered in water gives you a safety margin).
- Turn off oven, let cool overnight.
 
The boil will relax the molecule chains, restoring the shape, and the slow cooling will gently lock them back into place.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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Every time I replace the paper in my wet palette I basically fill it with boiling water from the kettle.   It doesn't seem to hurt it but does seem to expand the paper until it doesn't quite fit.

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1.jpgDISCLAIMER: I have never tried this.

 

Here's how I'd do it:

 

- Get an oven-safe stoneware or Pyrex glass dish, larger and deeper than the palette.

- Place palette in dish and weigh it down so it's perfectly flat (rocks, a brick, metal minis, whatever).

- Fill dish and palette with water. Enough to completely cover palette, but not so much as it spills over dish as it boils.

- Place in oven (uncovered) and bring to a boil. Since the palette is thin material, it doesn't need to boil more than a couple of minutes. If you're worried about melting the plastic, set the oven at no more than 250F (melting point should be about 266F or 130C, but being covered in water gives you a safety margin).

- Turn off oven, let cool overnight.

 

The boil will relax the molecule chains, restoring the shape, and the slow cooling will gently lock them back into place.

I wonder if the same could be achieved by using a pot or baking pan on a stovetop burner?

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Return it and make your own. Tupperware, parchment paper, sponges, water, and a penny!

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Return it and make your own. Tupperware, parchment paper, sponges, water, and a penny!

Eh, with a 40% off coupon, the kit is maybe $6 at Michaels. And that comes with sponge and paper (which I don't care for).

 

Just warped my tray yesterday via microwave, so I might try to fix it the ways people have said as well.

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Return it and make your own. Tupperware, parchment paper, sponges, water, and a penny!

Eh, with a 40% off coupon, the kit is maybe $6 at Michaels. And that comes with sponge and paper (which I don't care for).

 

Just warped my tray yesterday via microwave, so I might try to fix it the ways people have said as well.

 

 

I heat up my paper (as their directions say) the first time by putting it in a pyrex dish of water in the microwave until the water boils.  So never have placed the plastic container in directly.

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Return it and make your own. Tupperware, parchment paper, sponges, water, and a penny!

 

As a side note, modern pennies don't have enough copper in them now to make a difference. In the US you need a Lincoln Wheat Cent (pre 1964 I htink) penny for the copper to works it magic.

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Copper pennies work magic in wet palettes?!?

 

The copper cuts down on mold/fungus/whatever from growing in the sponge and water. I have a loop of copper wire around the bottom outside edges of mine. I have a tupperware type sandwich container that I can seal with the lid and keep paints fresh for weeks at a time. I just need to stir them up because the pigments will settle after a day or two. I left it alone for over a month a few times now, and the paints were fine after stirring them up.

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Return it and make your own. Tupperware, parchment paper, sponges, water, and a penny!

 

As a side note, modern pennies don't have enough copper in them now to make a difference. In the US you need a Lincoln Wheat Cent (pre 1964 I htink) penny for the copper to works it magic.

 

I've also heard that about modern pennies, that their copper is basically non-soluble and would have no effect on wet palette mold growth (though the penny itself may be mold free).

 

I've left my wet palette unused for weeks sometimes (way over a month), and no trace of mold or any kind of growth. And this was in a cool basement apartment that hasn't been heated in months. It was sealed tight, and the only thing special was that I used boiling water to soak it. Aside from that, I always wonder where everyone's mold is coming from? My apartment isn't *that* clean, and I don't believe everyone else lives in a cesspool either.

Edited by Cranky Dog

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