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OneBoot

Bones Wolf from 77176 Familiars

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Aaaahhh you found one of our Pups!

 

WOOF thanks you for retrieving him, he tends to wanders off

 

BONUS points for painting a WOLF!!!!

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Aw, it's got cute little shiny eyes. Very nice for a speed paint!

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I admire anyone who takes up a daily challenge.  Good luck with it!

 

This is a nice, quick paint job.  I agree with Pingo-- the shiny spots are a nice touch.

 

Q: Do the colors of the wolf and the ground sort of blend together in real life like they do in these pics?

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I admire anyone who takes up a daily challenge.  Good luck with it!

 

This is a nice, quick paint job.  I agree with Pingo-- the shiny spots are a nice touch.

 

Q: Do the colors of the wolf and the ground sort of blend together in real life like they do in these pics?

 

Thank you! ^_^

 

A: It's not quite as bad, but yeah they kind of do. I think a light drybrush of Clear Green will fix that, though. :)

 

Huzzah!        

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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you... did... the eyes...

 

on... tiny.. little... famliar...

 

o.O

 

Good lord! I can't even get the eyes on my son's High Elves lol

 

He looks soooo good! I've been really kinda scared to do these guys, even tho in our RPG my son the Druid changes familiars like you wouldn't believe lol

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He's adorable! Well placed highlights and awesome job with the eyes! He just needs a bone and a big, goofy tongue hanging out of the side of his mouth. ::P:

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I've been really kinda scared to do these guys, even tho in our RPG my son the Druid changes familiars like you wouldn't believe lol

 

Don't be scared! Because they're so small, you can get away with only hinting at details rather than actually painting them in. Like the wolf's eyes for example; literally all I did was fill the eye area with Solid Black, and put shine dots on. Same thing with his nose; I couldn't tell where it was supposed to end, so I just sort of blobbed Solid Black on the end of his muzzle and added a shine dot as an afterthought.

 

The thing you've got to remember is that, if they're intended for tabletop, practically no one will see the figure any closer than about 2 feet away. So as long as it looks okay at arm's length, you're good. ^_^ That's also why strong contrasts between light and dark areas are so effective; it helps the eye read a figure at a distance.

 

I appreciate a good drybrush, since honestly I am so terrible at it.

 

Having done quite a bit of drybrushing by now, I can say that the thing that helped me the most was realizing I almost always had too much paint left in my brush when I went to actually apply it. This meant that the paint was covering everything, rather than just the raised parts I was trying to focus on.

 

To get a feel for what the right amount is, I'd recommend grabbing a white-primed figure, or a scrubbed-off Bones, with lots of texture (fur is great for this!) and a very dark paint to practice with. Get just a tiny bit of paint on the very end of your brush and scrub it off on a white paper towel (do NOT use nice brushes for this!!!). If you can clearly see color coming off the brush still, keep scrubbing. If you can't see any more color, or just baaaaarely see color, you're probably good. You're aiming to remove around 90-95% of the moisture from the brush, leaving just the dry or nearly-dry paint pigments. This is also why drybrushing doesn't work well if your brush is damp; make sure to thoroughly dry your brush after you rinse it out between colors.

 

Now, pick an area of the mini with lots of texture and lightly draw the brush across just the tops of the detail. If you don't see anything, press just a hair more firmly, or do three-four more strokes (it might take a few strokes to build up enough color to be clearly visible). If you still don't see anything, it means you actually scrubbed too much paint out of the brush, so you'll need to repeat the step above. If too much color is applied, or it looks streaky, it likely means you didn't scrub off enough paint, or you're pressing too hard. If you see the color just on the raised parts of the area you're working on, it means you did it correctly! ^_^

 

I like to use flat brushes for this, since it makes it easier to just catch the raised textures, but you can do this with a regular brush as well; either turn it kind of sideways so you get more surface area, or use the tip to do a small, focused drybrush (like on a belt or brooch). Slightly frazzled brushes work great for when you want to cover lots of space.

 

Like any technique, it takes a little practice to get a good "feel" for how it works. Though not everyone likes the look of drybrushing, I've found that some neat effects can be achieved by drybrushing layers of different colors over each other, or by alternating drybrushing and washing/glazing. You can also do fun things by not scrubbing as much paint out and then rubbing the brush on a flat surface.

 

Sorry for the wall of text, I just really like drybrushing as a technique (it was the first one I attempted when I started painting, and was convinced it was basically magic), and wanted to share my thoughts! :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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On 11/3/2016 at 4:12 PM, OneBoot said:

 

Don't be scared! Because they're so small, you can get away with only hinting at details rather than actually painting them in. Like the wolf's eyes for example; literally all I did was fill the eye area with Solid Black, and put shine dots on. Same thing with his nose; I couldn't tell where it was supposed to end, so I just sort of blobbed Solid Black on the end of his muzzle and added a shine dot as an afterthought.

 

The thing you've got to remember is that, if they're intended for tabletop, practically no one will see the figure any closer than about 2 feet away. So as long as it looks okay at arm's length, you're good. ^_^ That's also why strong contrasts between light and dark areas are so effective; it helps the eye read a figure at a distance.

 

 

Having done quite a bit of drybrushing by now, I can say that the thing that helped me the most was realizing I almost always had too much paint left in my brush when I went to actually apply it. This meant that the paint was covering everything, rather than just the raised parts I was trying to focus on.

 

To get a feel for what the right amount is, I'd recommend grabbing a white-primed figure, or a scrubbed-off Bones, with lots of texture (fur is great for this!) and a very dark paint to practice with. Get just a tiny bit of paint on the very end of your brush and scrub it off on a white paper towel (do NOT use nice brushes for this!!!). If you can clearly see color coming off the brush still, keep scrubbing. If you can't see any more color, or just baaaaarely see color, you're probably good. You're aiming to remove around 90-95% of the moisture from the brush, leaving just the dry or nearly-dry paint pigments. This is also why drybrushing doesn't work well if your brush is damp; make sure to thoroughly dry your brush after you rinse it out between colors.

 

Now, pick an area of the mini with lots of texture and lightly draw the brush across just the tops of the detail. If you don't see anything, press just a hair more firmly, or do three-four more strokes (it might take a few strokes to build up enough color to be clearly visible). If you still don't see anything, it means you actually scrubbed too much paint out of the brush, so you'll need to repeat the step above. If too much color is applied, or it looks streaky, it likely means you didn't scrub off enough paint, or you're pressing too hard. If you see the color just on the raised parts of the area you're working on, it means you did it correctly! ^_^

 

I like to use flat brushes for this, since it makes it easier to just catch the raised textures, but you can do this with a regular brush as well; either turn it kind of sideways so you get more surface area, or use the tip to do a small, focused drybrush (like on a belt or brooch). Slightly frazzled brushes work great for when you want to cover lots of space.

 

Like any technique, it takes a little practice to get a good "feel" for how it works. Though not everyone likes the look of drybrushing, I've found that some neat effects can be achieved by drybrushing layers of different colors over each other, or by alternating drybrushing and washing/glazing. You can also do fun things by not scrubbing as much paint out and then rubbing the brush on a flat surface.

 

Sorry for the wall of text, I just really like drybrushing as a technique (it was the first one I attempted when I started painting, and was convinced it was basically magic), and wanted to share my thoughts! :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

Dry brushing is magic and this post ought to be pinned somewhere!

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