Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Kendal

Putty and Tools For A Newbie

Recommended Posts

I am going to try my hand at sculpting soon, but don't know anything. I don't know what tools I need, what putty I need, or anything! Could someone direct me as to what is a good putty to use, and what tools are crucial?

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of us start with Greenstuff, a two part epoxy putty.  if you get some try not to use the central strip where the two colors meet--it's very often too hard to cure properly (unless you're using if for filler of course).  Do mix it more thoroughly than you think necessary--it should be perfectly uniform in color.

As for tools...I use a bamboo skewer with a sewing needle shoved into the end (be careful), then wrapped with string and superglued.  My other favorite tools are bamboo chop sticks carved into a spatulate shape and one more of a rounded tip--double ended.  You'll pick up things like rocks and fabric and whatnot to press into the greenstuff for texture, but a lot of it is found materials.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One word: Sculpey! Or Fimo, or other heat-hardened material.

Greenstuff, Milliput and the other epoxies require you to finish 'quickly' and yeah, time isn't on your side as a beginner. (I'm barely beginning myself.)

 

There's a site Green Stuff World that has a lot of sculpting tools.

Especially, check their 'roll maker'.

(Yes, shipping cost is an issue, some of their stuff is worth it anyways)

 

They also have 'sample sizes' of the more common sculpting materials so that you can try out more materials relatively cheaply.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody familiar with bees putty?

 

Yes, it is a polymer based clay that is mixed with a sticky wax.  Unlike other polymer clays, it will stick directly to a wire armature without first needing a coat of uncured GS put down. Pattrick Kieth of Bombshell minis uses it.

 

I have some, but have only played with it sparingly as I have another 15 tubes of GS waiting for me in the freezer.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also someone here has mentioned before to not try and start sculpting people right off, but go with something more ambiguous, like TS's BMPC or rocks or something.

 

I started with a tree.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My issue with green stuff is I feel like when I roll it and use it, I have to make my tools wet so it doesn't stick. Then I can't pay attention to detail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Light coating of Vaseline and well polished tools.

Polish the tools with fine sandpaper?

I forgot what you said in class...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody familiar with bees putty?

 

Yes, I've tried it and it is pretty darned excellent. Buuuut.. I can't use it yet. The only medium I am any good with is Greenstuff (aka Kneadatite - very cheap on eBay) but if you want to try using polymer clay I'd say it's easier to use for a beginner than Fimo and other similar polymer clays because BeesPutty is firmer and has a curious wax-like quality to it. That's not to say it is better than Fimo, it's just different. Fimo is cheaper too.

 

Everyone sculpts a little bit differently so what works for me may not work for you. For Greenstuff, I mainly use an orange nail stick, a wooden stylus (made from a paintbrush handle and the same shape as an orange stick, a size 0 half-round clay shaper, a size 2 clay shaper, a fine needle mounted in a pen casing, an extra-fine needle in a pen casing (good for sculpting eyes and mouths - make sure it is absolutely sharp and clean) and a size 0 flat clay shaper.

 

You will also need a craft knife and spare blades to remove unwanted bulk... expect to do this A LOT.

 

If you can afford it and you can find one, I can thoroughly recommend buying an uncompleted Greenstuff armature made by a professional sculptor. I currently own four (and I've just bought some more) by Kev White which cost about £20 each - one is probably enough but it helps to have both a male and a female. I cannot express how much simpler it is to be able to hold the armature in my hand and see up-close how it all fits together. It's proven to be a huge time-saver.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My issue with green stuff is I feel like when I roll it and use it, I have to make my tools wet so it doesn't stick. Then I can't pay attention to detail.

 

Greenstuff goes-off eventually especially when exposed to the air. Make sure it's still sticky and hasn't gone weird and waxy. Except for needles and maybe embossing tools, I don't use metal tools very much with Greenstuff because they're heavy and they do tend to stick unless you are very light with them. I mainly use wood and silicone. Keep the tool moving, Greenstuff is sticky and things will stick to it. I don't use Vaseline anymore, I just use oil from my skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Light coating of Vaseline and well polished tools.

Polish the tools with fine sandpaper?

I forgot what you said in class...

 

 

I work through fine sand paper and eventually to rubber polishing points on my Dremel.  Gene goes a step further and uses polishing compound on a buffing wheel for his final stage. His tools are shiny.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...