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Ok, how do I do this?


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So I have some green stuff. I have a conversion ready for green stuff.

 

I rip open the bag of green stuff and then.... what?

 

Do I roll up little balls of puddy, sculpt scale plates individually, and then stick it on the mini, or do I attach the ball of goo straight to the mini and start carving and shaping?

 

Do I need to worry about shrinkage? The cheap "green modeler puddy in a tube" I used to fill out the gaps and holes seems to have "fallen" (Like a cake would) after it dried, and also cracked like old concrete. THe plan is to use "real" green stuff over top, so I'm not too worried about the poor way the first tubed puddy came out. Just want to make sure it doesn't happen with the final product.

 

Also, how durable is green stuff once it dries? I game with my figures, so this spider guy will be touched, moved, bumped and likely (but hopefully not) dropped. Can I seal and varnish the green stuff in order to give it a layer of "laquere like" protection, then prime and paint? Do I need to worry about it even?

 

I've never used green stuff, and I have no desire to toss 15 bucks out hte window, or destroy the conversion I have been (slowly) working on for over a year.

 

Maybe if I sneak up on it from the side, it'll be allright. :ph34r:

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OK, I'm going to take a stab at this.

 

First of all, when applying the kneadatite, you can work with it on the mini or off the mini, it is a preference thing. I prefer to apply the putty to the mini and work with it that way using tools and water. Don't forget the water to keep your tools from sticking to the putty. You can also apply the small balls for scales etc. I once took an old OOP Warzone mini and converted it into a Half-Orc Fighter/Wizard for my DM. I sculpted the chainmail and also a bag of scrolls on him using the putty. I even gave him hair as the original mini was bald.

 

The kneadatite should adhere alright to the cheaper putty and it won't shrink the way the cheap stuff did. Also kneadatite is essentially epoxy, therefore it is highly durable and will not come away from the metal after it is fully cured. There is no need to seal the kneadatite before priming. Just prime the mini and paint as normal.

 

If you are doing any parts that are going to be long and thin or sticking out, make sure to have an armature of wire that you build the putty over and have that wired anchored into the mini using your pin drill and Zap-A-Gap.

 

that is my two cents. Someone else may have a different take on things. YMMV.

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Thanks Enchantra! Some good points in there that I would never have considered. One more question that popped up though - should I 'glue" the green stuff armour plate onto the mini, or will the "epoxy-like" behaviouur of the putty meld it to the model?

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Thanks Enchantra! Some good points in there that I would never have considered. One more question that popped up though - should I 'glue" the green stuff armour plate onto the mini, or will the "epoxy-like" behaviouur of the putty meld it to the model?

The putty should adhere itself to the model as long as it isn't cured or hasn't begun to cure. Personally I prefer to sculpt onto the model to avoid the issue of attaching the putty after it has been sculpted.

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While we are on the subject of kneadatite, once mixed, how long is it workable? 5 minutes, 10 minutes, hours?

 

I bought a 6" strip at the local game store, and inside the package there is absolutely no info for working with the stuff.

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You have about 2 hours working time, and if you are doing stuff like chainmail or carving runes into things you need to let it set a bit (20 minutes or so) to make sure it doesn't move around too much on you. Also, the most important thing to remember (kind of like "thin your paints") is KEEP YOUR TOOLS LUBRICATED!

(insert your own joke here)

Seriously, nothing is worse than trying to sculpt something only to have the greenstuff stick to the tool and ruin all your work!

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Keep your tools lubricated.

 

One way is to wipe them on the side of your nose to pick up nose-oil ( Jewelers use this to lube mechanical watches ). This actually works quite well, and you have a portable, readily available supply of it.

 

Breathing hard on a figure also works. The water vapor from your breathe keeps the putty non-tacky.

 

Tool wise, I heard somewhere that some GW sculpters use sharpended toothpicks as tools. Well, it does work. A knife, and some whittling, and you can make a fine edged sculpting tool of any shape out of a toothpick. To make them more durable, you could saturate them with thin superglue, or use linseed oil which will harden.

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Green stuff does have a very long sculpt time (about 1-2 hours) but depending on the humidity and temperature of your room, it can undergo rapid changes in sculpting characteristics.

 

I's up in Edmonton, Canada...a landlocked winterbound heck (sorry, I'm bitter, there's STILL a half foot of snow on the ground here), and it's remarkably dry.

 

I find that as greenstuff dries, it becomes more rubbery and less sticky. This is good for most things, as it will stick less to your tools and cause you less problems, but sometimes it's a pain to get it to stick to the metal. For that reason, if you are working in any kind of dry enviroment, I suggest that you apply the epoxy to the model as soon as possible, and then shape it while it's on.

 

I find (especially if you're a SLOW sculpter like me) that if you put a thin skin of putty on the fig quickly, you can then take your time and sculpt all the detail into it (working with progressively finer and finer detail). As the putty dries, it becomes more rubbery and so you are less likely to destroy it as you add detail.

 

Very important is finding something to base your mini on so you can hold it firmly while you work... no matter WHAT the stage of cure, greenstuff always seems to manage to pick up a stray fingerprint or two if you're not careful.

 

I've had no real troubles with greenstuff durablity on the table. As long as you have a good armature holding up any thin or delicate pieces, you shouldn't have any trouble. Cured greenstuff is still pretty flexible, not brittle, so it should bend rather than chip or break.

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