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knarthex

FOR SCIENCE! Wood Grain From FSM Magazine

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So whilst searching for something completely different, I ran across an article in Fine Scale Modler Magazine by a guy painting WW1 aircraft...

 

Why is this important?

The article is on how to do a quick woodgrain on smooth surfaces...

 

He painted the floor with Tamiya Buff, then Gloss cote. after it dried, he ran streaks of W&N Burnt Umber, then did things to them....

018.jpg

Total time, less drying, he claims 10 minutes....

 

So I am going to try it out, and as my test I took a tounge depressor and primed white, steel wooled, primed again, (to minimize any actual wood grain)

 

Painted VMC Tan Earth onn part, Birch on another part, then GlossCoted...

017.jpg

 

Tommorrow will be the Burnt Umber....

(After I re read the article a time or 3....)

 

George

Edited by knarthex
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Just beware the dreaded oil paints...

Dreaded why? I love oils.

 

Always remember fat over lean. You can put oils (fat) over acrylics (lean), but you can't put acrylics over oils.

 

Interested to see this technique. I've made many attempts at a wood grain with acrylics, 't'ain't easy!

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You can paint acrylic over oil, but the oil layer has to be really dry.  I was mixing oil and acrylic on figures 15 years ago when I was transitioning to acrylic hobby paints.  You can't actually mix the paints, but you can put a layer of oil down -- and on minis it is pretty thin so the dry time is quick-- and paint acrylic over it an hour or two later.  Glazing and washes might not stick, but straight paint is fine. 

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I wonder how the W&N water mixable oil paints would work for this? I just got a small set of those a couple of weeks ago. They wash and dilute with water, no oil or solvents needed. I saw a tutorial from Secret Weapon where he painted outstanding rock bases with them and had to get some.

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Blame Buglips. ...

 

I LURVE the fact that after I typed "blame"

The only word autocorrupt put up was "Buglips"...

 

Sciencing around 9pm ish

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Just beware the dreaded oil paints...

Dreaded why? I love oils.

 

Always remember fat over lean. You can put oils (fat) over acrylics (lean), but you can't put acrylics over oils.

 

Interested to see this technique. I've made many attempts at a wood grain with acrylics, 't'ain't easy!

I used to use oils exclusively--Testor's (so...solvent-based, technically, but same principle)--as I began with model cars and planes.  I used Testor's on miniatures until I learned how to wash...  Turns out if you put thinner on top of dried oil paint you have thinned, ruined paint.  So that cringe is ingrained (pun half-intended) in me.

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Was to tired to post last night, but I did do the experiment whilst the Hangout Crew looked on and commented....

So I started out with some streaks of the W&N Burnt Umber on my testing stick

001.jpg

 

After about 45 minutes, I 'scrubbed' the semi dry paint with an old brush, and got the following look

I then dipped the brush in some Turpentine, (The SMELL! :blink: ) and scrubbed it around some more

002.jpg

I tried to keep a bit of the non turpentined area as well

 

003.jpg

 

That is pretty much what things ended up looking like.

And I discovered that the glossCote was to keep the turpentine from lifting the primer, as can be seen happening in the bottom of that pic....

Now I don't think that the experiment worked out for this set, for things are not 'even' in any sense of the word.

But, I think that if I had been trying to do this with whole sections instead of trying to do small bits of old and new, things might have worked better.

The lower right section of this pic above the lifted primer shows promise at least to my eyes....

Also, doing it for the first time, and this being maybe the third time I try to use artist oil paint, some additional practice might be in order....

 

The original article appears in Fine Scale Modeler Magazine, Sept 14, starting on p36, for those that wish to read the original work, and see what I did wrong...

 

George

 

PS

Also, whilst doing this, our Haminister of Truth asked what the glass glitter I recently purchased might look like mixed with snow flock. (he was working on his Frostgrave terrain) so I had some out, and mixed it up, but the hangouts camera wasn't something he could see, so I snapped a pic for him after I dumped it into a lipped round base....

004.jpg

Unfortunatly, it looks like stuff dumped int snow flock to me....

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I've used a similar technique for doing wood grain which also works with acrylics (though with acrylics you have a much shorter working time).

 

I made a quite loose glaze of colour (i.e. a lot of oil to the paint) and then spread it using a very coarse, raggedy, old hog-bristle brush. It works quite well, especially on open areas of wood like floorboards or panelling. Details like knots and whorls can be added with a toothpick or similar.

 

With acrylics, of course, you use acrylic medium rather than oil, but the principle is exactly the same. I haven't tried using a retarder with it, which should help with the compressed working time.

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I then dipped the brush in some Turpentine, (The SMELL! :blink: )

Use odorless mineral spirits like Gamsol. I had some odorless mineral spirits from the hardware store in the basement and the Gamsol is much nicer to work with than even those relatively mild spirits.

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So if at first you don't succeed....

 

So I am trying again!

 

This time, I am trying it along a broader scale, and with only a single base color, SC75 Thar Brown....

001_1.jpg

Which was given multiple coats, then sealed with glosscote.

 

Then I applied the Burnt Umber in a few different patterns....

009.jpg

 

Then I got busy with other things and yakking on the hangouts....

About 2 hours or so latter, I remembered that I started and grabbed the stick, sticking my thumb right into the paint at the end....

So after colorful euphemisms were explicitly stated, I decided that since smearing inks with finger tips whilst doing stone work had been a happy accident, I decided to go with it....(Far right side in the pic)

The other areas I did with an old flat brush, that kinda looks like a dust mop now....

010.jpg

This time, I also did not use any thinner on the semi dry paint.

It looks better to me, but still seems to need more, so I am going to try to add some more streaks of Burnt Umber and see what happens with a second coat....

 

Thanks for looking!

 

George

 

Science!

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