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Quick paint questions: pearl white, wash medium, blackened steel


Jessie
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Looking at picking up some new paints over the 12 days of reaper and had a few questions. I did some searches but couldn't find the answers.

 

Is pearl white metallic and/or shiny?

 

Does wash medium work like it sounds, I can add it to an existing paint and it will sort of turn that paint into a wash? Anyone have experience with this and do they like it?

 

Blackened steel - I have shadowed steel and use it a lot. Does anyone have both of these colors that could compare them? Do you like one over the other or find both useful?

 

Thanks I appreciate the help!

 

Also as an afterthought I'll take opinions on Reaper primers and sealers. I typically use army spray primer on metal minis, and either don't prime or use liner on the bones. Then I use testor's clear coat to prime everything. Anyone think there is any reason to switch over to Reaper stuff? Would like people's opinions.

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Pearl White is metallic, yes. You can use it straight or to highlight on top of a metallic silver or you can add it to matte paints to give them a sheen, although it does have a lot of white pigment in it so it will lighten any colour that you add it to.

 

I don't use washes a lot, but this thread has some great info from Wren about wash medium: http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/71773-msp-09300-wash-medium-guide/

 

I don't have blackened steel.

 

I use Reaper's brush-on primers because with my high humidity, I don't really have the option to use spray primers so it's good as an alternative to spraying for times that you can't or in instances where you've missed spots while spraying or maybe rubbed spots off and don't want to do a whole lot of re-spraying because you don't want to fill in details. I think the same reasons would apply for using brush-on sealer rather than the spray.

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Pearl white is metallic.  I use it to highlight when I paint true metallic metals, though it ends up thinning strangely for me and I generally glaze back over it with my silver to smooth out the blending.  Blackened steel is fairly dark- it makes a good shadow for metallics. I don't think I have shadowed steel, so not sure which one is darkest. I've loved using the metallics from reaper, though I understand the newer ones are brighter with a different flake than the older colors.  

 

On that note, has anyone played with blade steel, filigree silver or shining mithril?  How nifty are they? :)

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Pearl white- I'm using it right now to shine up a unicorn mane and hooves. It played well with the light pink mix I had going on.

 

Primers -on almost everything not bones I use the reaper white primer, have the other two but haven't really used them much yet, I personally really like it and it seems to work well.

 

Sealers - I know there's a trick where if you want to to add something to what you've painted, like freehand or OSL, to put a coat of brush on sealer down so it's easier to remove what you're adding on top with out taking off what you've done already. Otherwise it generally goes on well and I haven't had any issues with frosting when using it when it's humid. The new gloss sealer also seems to be pretty good, I just used to give a wet feel to a mini, I'd post a pic but my camera and computer are not talking to each other right now.

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Blackened steel - I have shadowed steel and use it a lot. Does anyone have both of these colors that could compare them? Do you like one over the other or find both useful?

The other questions seem to be answered, so I will try and help with this one. They are very similar colors, with Blackened Steel being slightly darker. It could honestly be treated as the next step in the triad and shade the Shadowed Steel further.

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So, let me add my question: Is Pearl White metallic or pearlescent? (If it's metallic, I need to order it, as I don't have a white metallic. I do have a white pearlescent paint, which I have been using in place of a white metallic, though. It seems to be working passably well.)

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So, let me add my question: Is Pearl White metallic or pearlescent? (If it's metallic, I need to order it, as I don't have a white metallic. I do have a white pearlescent paint, which I have been using in place of a white metallic, though. It seems to be working passably well.)

It's a nice pearlescent, not too strong though.

 

If you're looking for a white metallic, Shining Mithril (one of the Bones paints) is very very close, though not as brightly white as the Pearl White. If you manage to get your hands on a bottle of Sophie Silver, which was a Reapercon exclusive in 2015, that is a true white metallic (and super pretty!). Hope that helps! ^_^

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Nearly all metallic, pearlescent, iridescent, and interference colors use titanium dioxide coated mica flakes to provide their reflective luster and hue. There are a few exceptions, notably stainless steel and graphite gray, but actual metal powders are rarely used in waterborne paints because of their reactivity with the water.

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Nearly all metallic, pearlescent, iridescent, and interference colors use titanium dioxide coated mica flakes to provide their reflective luster and hue. There are a few exceptions, notably stainless steel and graphite gray, but actual metal powders are rarely used in waterborne paints because of their reactivity with the water.

 

Another exception is the Vallejo Liquid Gold line of metallics. These use an alcohol base and true metallic flakes. There are a few things different about using them, like not mixing with water, vigorous mixing required, and cleanup and thinning needs to happen with isopropyl alcohol. But wow, do these metallics look beautiful.

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