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SparrowMarie

Liquitex Inks

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I recently got a set of Liquitex inks as an early Christmas gift. It came with 6 different colors that I plan on making washes out of. However, one of the colors is titanium white, could I make a wash out of white? What could a white wash be used for? Are there other fun things I can do with these that isn't limited to making washes? I know very little about inks in general so any other advice on how to use them would be great.

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Hmmm... I imagine if you thin the white you could glaze it across an otherwise pinkish or blueish or even yellowish skin to give it a paler complexion. Or maybe make somebody look like they are wearing white tights.

 

I wouldn't go heavy or really wash with it. You'll probably end up with white puddles in the lines and cracks.

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If you glaze with them as per the ideas above, I would recommend a glazing medium otherwise I think you could run into some problems thinning it. Mine settles quite a lot, so be sure to shake well. I have only used my bottle to lighten the other colors so far, so I will be interested in what the collective mind thinks up. Here are my ideas:

 

Driftwood and sea rocks often have a whitewashed appearance. Sometimes you can see a similar appearace in desert or windswept areas. Although in this case you will need to redo the shadows after the wash. If you don't mind layering washes and carefully building up several of them, I think this could turn out an amazing piece.

 

With the emergence of frostgrave, I also can see this color becoming important. A light wash or glaze in white, may be useful in indicating a frosted look on items. A slight hint of blue will add to a cold feel, but it may be too easy to enter into pastel areas with the blue which is not useful.

 

Ice or white peaks on water are also uses for white ink. You will need gel or pouring (or water) medium for their properties of translucency and texture. Both of these all already white, but dry clear so experimentation may be needed for the proper color.

 

Best of luck and be sure to post results!

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check the bottles to see which ones are transparent/ opaque. White is definitely opaque.

Use transparent ones with a bit of medium and they are great with translucent bones.

I've posted in the painting tips advice with samples of that.

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Try using them straight as paints. They really are but just using a low-viscosity version of the acrylic binder, similar to airbrush medium, thus making it suitable for techniques where ordinary paints would be too thick. But yes, you can thin them out to make washes, even the titanium white. Though I prefer zinc white for this purpose, you can use a titanium white glaze to lighten darker under-layers gradually to build up to a solid white highlight.

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This set?

 

0v02753000000-st-01-liquitex-ink.jpg

 

Yes, this is the set.

 

This is great feed back. I'll definitely try to use it as a sheer fabric if I ever get something that I think could use it.  ^_^

Edited by SparrowMarie

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Make sure and check out the WIPs (and even their whole guidebook) from Antimatter Games for ideas on how to use the inks. He has some amazing quality in his paint jobs.

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Ghosts. For a really creepy effect, try painting ghosts inside-out: highlights in the recesses and shadows on the raised areas.

 

feralgeist_prod.jpg

 

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You can also mix it into other colors. So, red+white=pink, which might go very well as a wash for any light-colored fabric or hair, or light blue, which might wash over white to make ice.

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I need to use them more, but, for advanced tabletop, I've used them to thin basecoats while keeping the saturation high. 

 

For saturated cartoon red, on top of flesh, I found the coverage of inks MUCH better and thus FASTER than hobby paints. No subtlety here, but when you have *100* red videogame miniatures to paint, subtle goes elsewhere. 

 

pic3255071_md.jpg

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