Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
gr33n

Cannot avoid chalking

Recommended Posts

Get yourself a tube of zinc white artists acrylic (Liquitex calls theirs "transparent mixing white" but it's the same thing). You can mix tints with that and they won't turn chalky. If uneven sheen is bothering you, then a thin coat of brush-on acrylic varnish should regularize that.

 

(YMMV: your milage may vary; once a common phrase on car commercials when mentioning fuel efficiency numbers. Became part of the vernacular for any potential irregularity.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried mixing highlights for purple with a pinky skin tone? You might experiment with other off-white or not white lighter colours also. I almost never use true white to mix highlights.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chalking occurs from a few different reasons:

1) your paint brush isn't wet enough and the paint is drying on it and leaving behind "pebbles"

 

2) you aren't letting your previous coat dry long enough, then the next coat goes on and reactivates the paint beneath and moves it around

 

3) thinning the paint too much with too much water, causes the pigments in the paint suspension to separate and chalk up. I like to use a tad bit of flow improver and water like 2:1:1 paint:flow improver:water, then I make sure my brush doesn't have too much paint on it, wicking off on a damp sponge or microfiber towel or even a coffee filter.

 

4) bad paint or paint not shook up enough, if exposed to the elements (particularly below freezing). Sometimes paints go bad and there's nothing to do about it. Always make sure to shake the heck outta your paints or purchase a paint shaker such as those used by labs to shake blood samples.

 

If any or all of these are happening, you get chalking. It's hard to know as we don't see how you paint your figures. Hopefully this helps.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i glaze/thin thin thin layer. it seems impossible to avoid

 

also the chalking is mostly in the shading never have issues with bright colors

 

maybe chalking isnt the right word and its just sheen. I literally cannot use the color purple. it just chalks/has an odd sheen sprinkled in. this is so horrible

Edited by gr33n
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is just shiny, you can try spraying it with DullCote when it dries...

Glazes and washes can be shiny for some reason....

I would think that a brush on sealer would work also, but I have no experience with using them, though I do have some...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i glaze/thin thin thin layer. it seems impossible to avoid

 

also the chalking is mostly in the shading never have issues with bright colors

 

maybe chalking isnt the right word and its just sheen. I literally cannot use the color purple. it just chalks/has an odd sheen sprinkled in. this is so horrible

Pictures might help us identify the issue.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is just shiny, you can try spraying it with DullCote when it dries...

Glazes and washes can be shiny for some reason....

I would think that a brush on sealer would work also, but I have no experience with using them, though I do have some...

 

Yeah, I'd give either spray on Dullcote or another brand brush on matte sealer and see if that helps.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, sheen is definitely a different sort of problem. Reaper makes a product called anti-shine additive, and I imagine there may be similar products in other hobby or art paint lines. If you find the shine distracting to be able to tell if you've gotten deep enough shadows and such, you can add it to the paint to matte the paint while you're working with it rather than waiting to use a matte sealer at the end of the process. You need to shake it a ton before use, and add just a tiny bit at first, then a bit more if things are still drying shiny. (If you use too much, you will get a chalky/frosted look for sure!)

I don't see any problem in the figure you linked to, but maybe it's not something you can catch in photographs? (Your paint work looks great, btw!) Most of us have colours we find vexing, and not always the same ones(0. Many people complain about painting red, but it's never bothered me that much. (Photographing things painted red is a different story!) But I've personally had more trouble with blues. Purple may be your vexation, but hopefully you'll keep experimenting and find ways to bend it to your will!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, sheen is definitely a different sort of problem. Reaper makes a product called anti-shine additive, and I imagine there may be similar products in other hobby or art paint lines. If you find the shine distracting to be able to tell if you've gotten deep enough shadows and such, you can add it to the paint to matte the paint while you're working with it rather than waiting to use a matte sealer at the end of the process. You need to shake it a ton before use, and add just a tiny bit at first, then a bit more if things are still drying shiny. (If you use too much, you will get a chalky/frosted look for sure!)

 

I don't see any problem in the figure you linked to, but maybe it's not something you can catch in photographs? (Your paint work looks great, btw!) Most of us have colours we find vexing, and not always the same ones(0. Many people complain about painting red, but it's never bothered me that much. (Photographing things painted red is a different story!) But I've personally had more trouble with blues. Purple may be your vexation, but hopefully you'll keep experimenting and find ways to bend it to your will!

yeh I can't get it in a pic. I don't know of any competition painters who are spraying dullcote so I would hesitate to consider that an option. There must be something going wrong here because there should be no chalky/shiney streaks on the shades. Again its ONLY these purples...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't seal competition pieces anymore, and I know others who have eschewed it, but I don't think Dullcote has been universally rejected? I do mix in the anti-shine additive as very occasionally necessary.

 

Are you having problems just with the pinky type purples, or all purples? I use more blue shade purples all the time for shading, but it's been a while since I painted with a pinky one. (I have used Reaper Witchcraft Purple and don't recall having issues with it, but it just haven't had occasion to use it for a bit.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't seal competition pieces anymore, and I know others who have eschewed it, but I don't think Dullcote has been universally rejected? I do mix in the anti-shine additive as very occasionally necessary.

 

Are you having problems just with the pinky type purples, or all purples? I use more blue shade purples all the time for shading, but it's been a while since I painted with a pinky one. (I have used Reaper Witchcraft Purple and don't recall having issues with it, but it just haven't had occasion to use it for a bit.)

pinky purples. i use purple to shade my reds all the time no issue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Just a sidenote, Roman Lappat regularly uses dullcote in some form or the other to kill shine even between different stages of painting. I know Pepa Saavedra does as well. 

 

In the end, shine or matte is also an artistic choice, some top tier competition painters say it needs to be ultra-matte and so seal it with dullcote (I recall somebody else mentioning this in a videos... Farabi perhaps?), others love the deepness of a more satin blue-black for the shadows. 

So don't be afraid to use dullcote if you like how it looks just from a perceived idea that "if you are good enough you don't need to use sealer". That is foolish and limiting.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't seal competition pieces anymore, and I know others who have eschewed it, but I don't think Dullcote has been universally rejected? I do mix in the anti-shine additive as very occasionally necessary.

 

Are you having problems just with the pinky type purples, or all purples? I use more blue shade purples all the time for shading, but it's been a while since I painted with a pinky one. (I have used Reaper Witchcraft Purple and don't recall having issues with it, but it just haven't had occasion to use it for a bit.)

pinky purples. i use purple to shade my reds all the time no issue

 

 

Possibly this is a property of the pigment those shades are made with. Some pigments are quite shiny. I don't know that I have anything I'll be painting in the near future I could use that colour on, but I'll try to keep it in mind if the occasion arises to refresh myself on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did manage to find an occasion to try some reddish purples. The dress midtone is Witchcraft Purple, shaded with Royal Purple and Monarch Purple, and highlighted with Bubble Gum Pink. I didn't have any particular trouble with shine or chalkiness or anything that I noticed. This is not sealed, and I did not use any anti-shine additive. 

I paint fairly thin, but possibly not as thin as you do. I have occasionally noticed that lots of thin layers can occasionally cause shine. What the paint is thinned with can be a big factor, too. Many additives and mediums (flow improver, glazing medium, all those kinds of things) are at least satin, and some are outright glossy. This isn't always noticeably if paint is only moderated thinned and/or applied in a few layers, but can build up to be very noticeable when glazing over a lot of layers, or be more of an issue with particular colours.

 

I don't know if any of that is relevant to your particular problem, but I think I'm out of useful advice that might be, sorry. :-<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious, since I've seen it mentioned before, a good shade color can be achieved mixing in a complementary color, but does that work for purple, since yellow is its complementary color?

 

(Also, I'm wondering if using a complementary colors to create the shade would possibly help with the chalkiness issue as well?)

 

My 2 yen,

Akiosama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...