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CoolAliasHere

Bones and the table top..

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I have been gaming for a vast majority of my life.  I've played everything from WarHammer to D&D, and many things in between.  In my younger years, before I had actual bills and living expenses, doling out cash for the latest model for whatever table top I happened to be into was not big deal.  As an adult, I found myself less willing to part with substantial amounts of money for game pieces.  That being said, I have found a love in the Bones sets that Reaper has put out.  They are easily modded, and wonderful to paint, and the price!! Don't get me started.

 

In my current Table top game, D&D, I have purchased and painted all of the characters for my players.  Each of the players are metal models from Reaper.  All of my monsters and NPCs are Bones models, with a couple of exceptions that came from other board games like Zombicide Black Plague or Descent.  My players love having painted models on the table, and I feel like it allows them to be more invested in the game.  I have even found myself, more recently, looking through the Bones models and building encounters in my cart online.  The, I purchase and paint them up, so they are ready for the game.

 

So I was wondering, with all of the talent on these forums, how many of you use the Reaper minis for games (other than the Reaper games like WarLord)?  Do you use them for RPGs?  Do you ever have trouble finding a mini that suits your needs as a character or monster?

 

CAH

 

 

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I use whatever minis are at hand, Reaper doesn't always suit my needs. Their collection of, for instance, goblins with blunderbusses is lacking.

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I have collected many brands of miniatures over the decades, to fit the needs of an evolving variety of games.  Reaper is always an affordable and easy to find choice, though they don't always have what I'm looking for.  The Bones are ok for getting cheap targets on the table (zombies, mooks, etc) but for player characters that will see months of use I prefer to paint metal. 

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I collect and paint for fun and display.

 

Including Bones.

 

Especially the larger monsters are well detailed, and I can afford more to create fun armies.

 

Aside from those I happily buy the more expensive metals or resin minis and busts.

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I use Reaper and Reaper Bones for a whole lot of gaming - with Pathfinder and Kings of War being the main ones.

 

For a children's game that I run on Tuesday nights the Bones are a godsend - making it possible for me to have minis on the table, without fear of... bad things happening to them. (A long ago memory - a kid picking up two of my miniatures, saying 'look, they're fighting!' and crashing them together, as the entire world went into slow motion and I surged forward crying 'Nooooo! Stooop!'....)

 

They are fun to paint, and very, very sturdy.

 

People have put them through stress tests - up to, and including, hitting them repeatedly with a hammer....

 

Victoria Lamb squashed one of her Bones orcs under a trade paperback of Game of Thrones....

 

The Auld Grump

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I use a combination of painted minis in our RPGs.  About half of them are Bones.  But I do have a lot of metal minis.  My Western minis are 95% metal, but that is because all the Bones Western figures make up less than 5%.  I do have multiples of some bones western figures.  But charring them around is very heavy.

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If I was running a D&D game I'd use lots of Bones.  Harder for the greasy-fingered nonpainting heathens to destroy those.  For collecting I much prefer metal.  Recently, some observant people on this board may have noticed I am painting hordes of things - but these hordes are metal.  This would suggest I'm painting for game... but why am I not therefore doing Bones?

 

Well, the answer is that there is presently no game and these are for my collection.  You might wonder why I need 30 or so of a thing just for my collection.  What I'm doing is fulfilling an old dream - to get and paint as many things from 1st Edition Monster Manual, Fiend Folio, and Monster Manual II in a robust # appearing as I can.  I cap the max at 30, since I presently foresee no need for 400 goblins.

 

This gives me organization and a long term goal.  And, if I should find several people I could trust not to mangle them, might someday allow me a 1st Edition AD&D game so lavishly equipped that it would attract the envy of the late Gary Gygax himself. 

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I use whatever minis I happen to have handy. A lot of those (thanks to a number of kickstarters) are Bones, but I have also metal Reaper, some random Ral Partha (no paints. Don't get excited), and some might have been warmahordes something or other intended when they were sold. I needed large wolves.... >..>

 

But I'm liking bones for being lightweight, easy to modify and clean up ... and not fragile the way resin and metal can be.

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I find that for the most part needing a particular mini for a game is great motivation to actually get it painted.  Since a fair amount of our gaming does involve kids and teens, I've been painting more Bones.  I've even started just painting up an assortment of common character types to use as NPCs or for the kids to borrow.  (Bones, of course!) 

 

For PCs in long running campaigns I'll look farther afield for just the right mini.  Reaper has an extensive catalog so they often have what I'm looking for, but not always. 

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I've used the first and second Bones Kickstarters to make up about 65%-75% of my Frostgrave collection;  spellcasters, soldiers and monsters. 

 

For photos of them "in action", see our two Frostgrave threads:

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/67532-frostgrave-campaign-2016/

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/72438-frostgrave-campaign-2017/

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I have collected many brands of miniatures over the decades, to fit the needs of an evolving variety of games.  Reaper is always an affordable and easy to find choice, though they don't always have what I'm looking for. 

 

 

 

Including Bones.,  the larger monsters are well detailed, and I can afford more to create fun armies.

 

Aside from those I happily buy the more expensive metals or resin minis.

Having been playing and painting since 1977, I have a preference for what I am used to, ie metal.

(Back when there was only metal minis for gaming, at least that was the only material I was aware of....)

 

My gaming group has been with me for a loooong time, and they know the time and effort that I put into painting minis, so they are careful with them.

Sure, things happen, but the trade off for figures under 3" in height of crispness of detail puts me firmly in the metal camp for these minis.

 

For the larger figures, Giants, Dragons, terrain, etc, Bones is a wonderful thing!

 

There would not be a Ma'al Drakkar if there were no Bones....

Or it would be of such a rarefied price point that there would be very few of them made, as it would not be viable for a company to produce them in any large numbers.

 

Resin is still something that I am just beginning to try out, with a few figures that are not made in any other medium.

The detail on them is akin to the detail that metal has, but the fragility factor goes way up...

 

But a Metal mini for $10 vs the same in Resin for $20, I'll take the metal, thanks.

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Most resin pieces I have are Busts. These are pure display pieces and well worth the money.

 

Metal is still my no. 1 but I do have a lot of Bones due to Kickstarters.

 

The larger ones are awesome, some of the smaller ones too.

And at least a lot are very useful because you get cheap components.

 

Need a weapon? a body part? Cut up some cheap Bones and adorn a base.

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I have used minis for gaming since the 90s when possible. I have used Bones when I last DMed in 2012-2013.

 

The ones I used most were the Orcpocalypse set and the goblin trios (the non-Pathfinder ones) from Bones 1. They were my stand-ins for many humanoid battles. And since I painted each set in different color schemes, it made tracking their hit points relatively simple.

 

Of course, back then I didn't have everything I wanted painted yet, so sometimes the unpainted ones got easily confused with each others (be it between metals or between Bonesium minis).

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My first minis were from the HeroQuest game, and they still see some table use even today, but yeah, the Bones minis are great when I need to toss an elf ton of monsters onto the table. They've also seen use in my Frostgrave warbands. But I'm always perfectly happy to mix and match whatever to make the game look good.

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I use whatever minis I need when gaming.

 

Be they bones or any other companies minis.

 

Plastic, vinyl, metal, resin, restic, whatever.

 

As long as they are what I need at the time they go on the table.

 

It can be difficult to find the exact mini you need so close is usually good enough.

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