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WIP: Halfling riding a gryphon


Pragma
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I play a pathfinder game with my wife, where my character is a halfling druid. Recently he found a magic egg that hatched into a gryphon. So naturally I now need a mini of a halfling riding a gryphon.

 

For the rider, I chose 77218: Woody Stumpwimple, Halfling Ranger. He has a bow and a sword and a cloak, just like my character. He has a nice wide stance that will make it easier to put him on a saddle. And he is in a heroic pose that makes it look like he is about to lead a charge.

post-8559-0-45133300-1487312317.jpg

 

The first step is getting the main shape of the saddle in sculpey on top of the gryphon (77157: Griffon). I pressed the rider into the saddle to make sure he would fit the way I want. It makes the top of the saddle look weird, but it will be covered by the rider.

post-8559-0-33383000-1487312316.jpgpost-8559-0-87411300-1487312316.jpg

 

And here he is on top:

post-8559-0-92207700-1487312317.jpg

 

As a next step, I need to bake the saddle. Then I will start adding straps, stirrups, maybe a bridle and reins. There is a bunch more converting to do before I start painting.

 

So, has anyone attempted this sort of thing before? I searched online but I only found one example. It seems like it should be the kind of thing people have tried before, and I'd love to know what works and what doesn't.

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Love this! Going to follow along. 

 

I'm not that good with sculpting, so I usually  just mess around until I find something I like that works for my projects. I would be tempted to use some thin wire for those stirrups and other parts and then put sculpey over it and bake it all at one time. Or use some sort of putty like green stuff or pro create with tiny wire armatures underneath and allow to harden. 

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Thanks! I think I'm going to use green stuff for the next parts, since sculpey would require baking. I have to remove the sculpey from the model in order to bake it, since I have doubts about putting bones in the oven. So I think it will be easiest to just put green stuff directly onto the gryphon for the straps. For reins and stirrups, you're right, it may be useful to have a thin armature.

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Thanks! I think I'm going to use green stuff for the next parts, since sculpey would require baking. I have to remove the sculpey from the model in order to bake it, since I have doubts about putting bones in the oven. So I think it will be easiest to just put green stuff directly onto the gryphon for the straps. For reins and stirrups, you're right, it may be useful to have a thin armature.

I believe Corporea put her bones in the oven to bake sculpey for her nightmare piece. But for such small details as reins and stirrups, green stuff is probably the way to go anyway.

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You might check out this article for mounting an unmounted figure....

 

not the same figures, but....

 

Just noticed that Herr Oberfroschmeister is the author....

 

Why am I not surprised?

 

Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for! It seems like I am roughly on the right track, but it's good to know that I am following in the webbed footsteps of greatness.

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I believe Corporea put her bones in the oven to bake sculpey for her nightmare piece. But for such small details as reins and stirrups, green stuff is probably the way to go anyway.

 

Thanks, that will be good to know for the future. I wound up removing the sculpey before baking, but this wasn't easy because of the feathery texture underneath. It would have been much easier to bake directly on the model. But I can fix the gaps with greenstuff, which will also help stick it on a little better.

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you could get the air dry sculpy?

 

but honestly I think GS would work better, as you can get cleaner lines imo and be able to handle it to fix it to where you want better

 

Anyway, looks awesome!! It's amazing how many figures get started like that lol We've had a thief turn into a ferret, and a warrior turn into a cute werewolf cub (which then grew up!) necessitating interesting choices for minis!

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Green stuff seems to be the way to go. I first filled the gaps between the saddle and the gryphon. I also made a strap and buckle following an excellent youtube tutorial by Tom Mason on how to sculpt belts and buckles. The rings I made by slicing a little section from a plastic hollow cylinder that wound up in my bits bucket - it might be from the inside of a pen or mechanical pencil.

 

post-8559-0-61746300-1487476610.jpgpost-8559-0-21487300-1487477476.jpg

 

I am thinking that next I will add another strap between the front legs and the wings, then maybe a bit and bridle.

 

I haven't decided yet if I should try to paint the rider before attaching him, or if I should wait until after. I am worried that it will be tough to paint him once he is attached because of all the details on his front side. On the other hand there will be lots of gaps to fill which suggests maybe I should paint him after attaching. Thoughts?

Edited by Pragma
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On 2/18/2017 at 7:45 AM, Guildenstern said:

you could get the air dry sculpy?

 

but honestly I think GS would work better, as you can get cleaner lines imo and be able to handle it to fix it to where you want better

 

Anyway, looks awesome!! It's amazing how many figures get started like that lol We've had a thief turn into a ferret, and a warrior turn into a cute werewolf cub (which then grew up!) necessitating interesting choices for minis!

 

I've never heard of air dry sculpey ... sounds intriguing. I will have to look into that. For now, I have to agree that GS is the way to go.

 

It's nice to play with creative players, it's the best inspiration for crazy mini projects!

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Green stuff seems to be the way to go. I first filled the gaps between the saddle and the gryphon. I also made a strap and buckle following an excellent youtube tutorial by Tom Mason on how to sculpt belts and buckles. The rings I made by slicing a little section from a plastic hollow cylinder that wound up in my bits bucket - it might be from the inside of a pen or mechanical pencil.

 

attachicon.gifstrap1.jpgattachicon.gifstrap2.jpg

 

I am thinking that next I will add another strap between the front legs and the wings, then maybe a bit and bridle.

 

I haven't decided yet if I should try to paint the rider before attaching him, or if I should wait until after. I am worried that it will be tough to paint him once he is attached because of all the details on his front side. On the other hand there will be lots of gaps to fill which suggests maybe I should paint him after attaching. Thoughts?

First thought screamed at me, SEPARATELY! if you are worried overmuch about gaps, decide where you want them filled.

1. On the Saddle

or

2. On the Mini

 

Either way you decide, you can put some vaseline on the part you don't want the filler, and add some putty to the part you do want the filler.

Put them together, likely with a pin in the rider's arse, and a hole in the Gryphon's neck.

Then, sculpt the gap fills the way you want them, and separate the two parts.

You could take a chance and let the putty cure in place, trusting that the vaseline will keep them able to be separated, but, being a Drow, I am not a trusting soul....

whichever way you decide to go, if you use vaseline, make sure to give things a wash with some dish soap or simple green to prevent later paint adhesion issues...

 

As for a bit and bridle, these work with a horse by causing pain in the soft parts of the horse's mouth on the side you want it to turn away from. With something like a gryphon, with no real soft parts, you would likely need to drill holes in the beak to add rings to bake a bit and bridle work....

NOT very druid like....

The saddle would be needed for the rider's safety, kind of hard, for me anyway, to reconcile the bit and bridle thing for a druid...

 

Just my 2PP

 

Also between the 2 straps you have done already:

post-8559-0-94641000-1487488289.jpg

you might want to place another strap from the neck strap to the body strap running between the forelimbs.

this will give the tension on the straps 'balance' for lack of a better word, so that the gryphon doesn't get strangled by the front strap as it flexes it's body in different directions...

If that makes any sense...

Look for reference pics of saddles for different animals to see what I mean....

Edited by knarthex
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