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Running the Game


sirgourls
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Hi all! I've been a fan of Matt Colville for awhile and his Running the Game series for awhile now and thought I'd spread the goodness here.

 

For the uninitiated, this series of YouTube videos is aimed at newer DMs who are looking to start running D&D for the first time (especially at the beginning of the series), but there's plenty of good stuff for DMs of any experience level to mine. I've found them incredibly instructive for how I run and think about my game to be sure.

 

And, while there's a focus on D&D, there's certainly material that is transferable to any game you're running. Anyway, have a gander (note: this isn't the first of the series, but rather the first of his I saw, which is about railroad campaigns vs the sandbox)!

 

https://youtu.be/EkXMxiAGUWg

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I just came across my favorite thing I've heard him say so far:

 

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But D&D is not the story you [the DM] want to tell.  It's the thing that happens at the table.  If you already know all the good bits, then you don't need players.

 

:winkthumbs:

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Thanks for the link.  Watched the first few videos and definitely looks worth watching the rest.  I agree about the fast pace (though I'm a bit of a fast talker myself) but his voice makes up for it.  

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On 3/6/2017 at 3:07 PM, David Brawley said:

Absolutely! That's why I'm such a strong proponent of letting the dice fall where they may. If I knew what was going to happen, it wouldn't be any fun!

And one of the things I loved about the FFG Star Wars roleplaying line.  The dice were no longer a pass/fail mechanic, but had additional modifiers that forced you to come up with why a good or bad or other thing happened in addition to passing or failing.  Not every time, but often enough that you learned to be creative about describing events involving the dice.  All too often with D&D we lost the creative aspect and hacked and slashed our way through to get back to the story bits.

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