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Hey guys I am just starting out painting the Bones set miniatures.  I want to create a big battle scene with many characters.  I would like to include some that look like they have been KIA.  Anyone have any ideas on how to achieve this?  Are there characters in Bones that are dead (not undead or skeletons)?  Are there characters from any other sets that might go with the Bones that looked like they have been killed?

 

Any tips are appreciated! 

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Unfortunately, casualties of any sort from any company are few and far between. (Non-humanoid (hell, even just non-human) corpses are basically non-existent.)

 

 

However, as noted above, Reaper does have two human casualties...

 

These actually roughly correspond to the Bones figures 77023: Barnabas, Human Warrior and 77008: Garrick the Bold. (These two Bones figures are based on previously released metal Warlord sculpts...)

The Overlord casualty lying on the ground isn't too terribly hard to convert by removing the arrows and then cutting and pasting the limbs into different positions, but there's not much you can do with the Crusader casualty.

 

The plastic Mantic figures are a little bit smaller than the Reaper figures, but not enough to be truly noticeable.

 

There are some other brands that have casualty figures, but like the two Warlord figures they're nearly all metal, which could get a bit spendy if you're doing a serious battle scene.

Edited by Mad Jack
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Another option is to just take Bones models and lay them down... You might need to reposition (or remove!) some limbs, and in some cases you might find it easier to just lay them face down because their faces might be too obviously not dead... ::): One of the advantages of Bones is how easy they are to convert. A little careful cutting with a hobby knife and you can easily cut them apart, and superglue works to put them back together the way you'd like. You might need a little Green Stuff (aka kneadatite) to fill in some gaps, but for small gaps it's generally easy to do. If you're worried about the facial expression, you could also cut parts of the face off and add some gore.

 

(Trust me: if you're worried about converting Bones, don't be. They're easy to convert. The only tricky thing is to be careful about how you're cutting so you don't hurt yourself. Well, that and being careful not to superglue yourself to the table... the way Reaperbryan has done. ::P: )

 

If you'd find it helpful to see an example, I could try digging through some of my extras and try to convert one to a corpse...

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Another option is to just take Bones models and lay them down... You might need to reposition (or remove!) some limbs, and in some cases you might find it easier to just lay them face down because their faces might be too obviously not dead... ::): One of the advantages of Bones is how easy they are to convert. A little careful cutting with a hobby knife and you can easily cut them apart, and superglue works to put them back together the way you'd like. You might need a little Green Stuff (aka kneadatite) to fill in some gaps, but for small gaps it's generally easy to do. If you're worried about the facial expression, you could also cut parts of the face off and add some gore.

 

(Trust me: if you're worried about converting Bones, don't be. They're easy to convert. The only tricky thing is to be careful about how you're cutting so you don't hurt yourself. Well, that and being careful not to superglue yourself to the table... the way Reaperbryan has done. ::P: )

 

If you'd find it helpful to see an example, I could try digging through some of my extras and try to convert one to a corpse...

 

 

Yeah that would be awesome if you could maybe give me an example!  I was thinking that this is exactly what I would have to do, I just wasn't sure if it was feasible or really where to start. 

 

If its too much trouble don't worry about it but I sometimes have a hard time visualizing how things will come out so an example would really help.  

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Yeah that would be awesome if you could maybe give me an example!  I was thinking that this is exactly what I would have to do, I just wasn't sure if it was feasible or really where to start. 

 

If its too much trouble don't worry about it but I sometimes have a hard time visualizing how things will come out so an example would really help.  

 

Shouldn't be a problem. My D&D game got cancelled due to the DM being ill (which is worrying since he's looking after my kids today so they're probably going to get sick again :down: ) and I've got a lot of spare Bones figures hanging around with no particular purpose in mind that I got basically for free. ::): 

 

I should warn you that I'm really very far from being an expert at this. :lol: But that might be useful in this case, because trust me, if I can do a conversion, you can be confident that you can do it too. ::P: 

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 The only really tough part about converting a figure to a casualty, assuming they're in a reasonably decent position to start with, is the cloth on the figure - moreso than anything else on the figure, the shape and position of the cloth will indicate which way things like gravity and the wind are pulling on the figure.

Moving figures will have cloth that billows and flares and rolls back on itself with long curves, but for a figure lying on the ground the cloth is just haphazardly draped over them, hanging towards the ground.

Figures in plate armor are generally pretty easy, but robes and chainmail can be a bit of a problem if you want them to look really good, and will more than likely require a bit of resculpting or just being cut off completely. A figure completely in robes is going to be a major operation, and should probably be sculpted from scratch.

 

The basic process is simple, though - it'll seem complicated, but one you start thinking about it step by step it'll be simple.

 

It's even easier if you happen to have a game like Skyrim or Oblivion, since you can just take a dead enemy and drag them into the pose you want for your miniature and take some screenshots for reference... ::D:  Or even a puppet, doll or highly-articulated action figure.

If you're not sure of how to position a particular joint or limb, get down on the floor yourself in the same pose as the figure.

 

First decide if the character is laying face up or face down, and then carefully separate the arms and legs from the torso if A) they're going to interfere with the body laying flat or B) they're not close enough to their final position to work as they are. If the position of the arms and legs is dynamic, or lifts parts of the torso off the ground, it'll appear as though the character just fell, and is still trying to move or thrash weakly.

Actual corpses need to be slumped bonelessly.

You'll want to remove the head. No matter which way the body's laying, the position of the head will need to be changed since it'll just be flopping around and no longer actively supported. Head position is important for making them look dead. It'll eventually end up tilted either far forward or far back, and likely rotated to one side.

 

 Clearly, this process is quite often easiest if you have a large number of bits and random figure parts with which to build your corpse from scratch, rather than having to disassemble a solid figure. But it's all just a matter of cutting and pasting, so starting from a single solid figure just takes more time.)

 

You'll want to start by laying the torso down first, since it's the attachment point for all the extremities and the heaviest part of the body, so it's position will necessarily dictate the position of all the extremities in relation to it. If you're not going to put it on a base, make sure you're working on a flat surface so the reassembled figure will sit flat when it's done. Remember that it's not just a piece of plastic but a human body with weight to it. This will help you visualize how the body should be posed.

Then carve off all the details on the side touching the ground until it's mostly flat. How much you take off will depend on what the body is wearing and what it's supposed to be lying on. The softer the material of the armor or clothing the figure is wearing, the more it will flatten out when they hit the ground. What are they going to be lying on? If it's soft like dirt or snow, they'll have sunk in just a tiny bit and you'll want a bigger flat spot on the bottom. Something hard like stone, hard things like armor wouldn't flatten out at all, but clothing or chainmail would flatten out even more, leaving more of the body in contact with the floor or ground.

If you had to cut off any cloth because it didn't sit right, you'll probably end up sculpting it back on with putty at this point (unless it's going to be draped over the limbs as well).

 

Once you have the torso so it sits right on the ground, start putting the limbs back on. At this point, you'll want to decide if you need to separate the limbs at knees, elbows, feet or wrists in order to make them sit right. You may need to either slice off more material to make them fit their desired position, or may need to add greenstuff to fill the gaps in the joints. If you're not placing the corpse on a base, you may need to pin the limbs back on, especially if you're going to be reconstructing parts of them with greenstuff or putty.

Lastly you can reattach the head - it will end up flopped toward the ground and probably leaning to one side or the other, particularly if they're face down. More than likely, the attachment point will need a bit of putty to fill in a gap on one or more sides.

 

The process itself is fairly basic, but depending on the individual figure you're using it can take a fair bit of time to make it look good.

Obviously, a casualty used as a gaming piece doesn't need to be anywhere as good-looking (for a corpse, lol) as something that'll be front and center on a diorama.

Edited by Mad Jack
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Thanks for the help everyone!  Sounds like it might be difficult but I'll give it a shot.  

 

I know that you can put the figures in boiling water to straighten weapons and what not, do you think that I can do the same thing with the whole figure to make the body bend?  Depending on what the original position was I was thinking to make the body look limp and possibly attach it to the had of a dragon to make it appear the dragon is holding a body, does that sound possible?  Think that will look cool?

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With Bones, repositioning a straight limb like say a leg should be as easy as cutting a notch out of the inside back of the knee, bending it with hot water, and then superglueing it together in the bent position.

 

Just heating and bending a limb will have it eventually slowly straighten out again, and might give a bendy noodle look to the repositioned limb in the meantime.

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